7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 14, 2015 12:36 PM by Peter DL

    What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?

    MarkJoseph

      Hi! I'm trying to figure out how to make the most of the various color calibration profiles Adobe offers for my cameras with Lightroom 5. I do understand the purpose of the camera-specific options--they're designed to help approach camera JPEG processing mode colors. And they work wonderfully--they're very helpful!

       

      But I don't really understand the purpose of the "Adobe Standard" calibration option. What is it for? Why does it look the way it looks? Has it been designed to ease certain processing goals? To enhance certain colors or tonal combinations? Is it designed to be more accurate than the manufacturer profiles in some way? What can I do with "Adobe Standard" that I can't do with one of the camera-specific calibration options?

       

      I would find it *extremely* helpful if someone who's involved with the engineering behind Lightroom's color (or anyone else who's especially knowledgeable about Lightroom's design) might talk a little bit about why "Adobe Standard" looks the way it looks. What's it for? To what purposes can I leverage it?


      Thanks so much!


       

        • 2. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
          Jeff Schewe Level 5

          MarkJoseph wrote:

          I would find it *extremely* helpful if someone who's involved with the engineering behind Lightroom's color (or anyone else who's especially knowledgeable about Lightroom's design) might talk a little bit about why "Adobe Standard" looks the way it looks. What's it for? To what purposes can I leverage it?

           

          Well, I doubt you'll get somebody from Adobe to answer, but I'll take a shot. "Adobe Standard" is Adobe's attempt at rendering an "accurate" rendering from the camera sensor without the typical camera based adjustments...Adobe uses some pretty exotic hardware to read the sensor's actual response to spectral distribution data...meaning they read the way a sensor responds to light and how that impacts the way the sensor renders the colors at D65 & Spectral Illuminate A (approximately 2856 K).

           

          Does it match what the camera makers do? Nope...is it "accurate" generally speaking (depending on the camera model) yes...while the camera makers tend to enforce their own "looks" on raw captures, Adobe chooses to try to "normalize" images which impact color and tonality. The various renderings in certain cameras are meant to replicate various camera maker's rendering–in general less "accurate" than Adobe Standard...YMMV (meaning raw captures tend to be all over the map and none are really "correct").

           

          My advice? don't sweat it...try to get the best rendering for your images based on the various ACR/LR adjustments.

          • 3. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
            areohbee Level 5

            Adobe Standard looks pretty-much the same whether you shoot with a Canon, a Nikon, or any other brand.

            • 4. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
              BKKDon Level 4

              Hi,

               

              I guess it is a 'warmer' standard conversion, unfortunately under the same conditions and WB (50 difference) it doesn't quite match over different cameras.

               

              First picture is SONY and the next Canon, it seems as though the color rendition is different more vibrant, richer and natural on the Canon image and a little yellow color cast in the Sony image. Of course they have different sensors.

               

              Both are actually pleasing BUT the Canon image is a proper representation of the colors. (For the Sony image the Camera Deep profile gets closer to a natural rendition)

               

              AdobeStandard.jpg

              • 5. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
                MarkJoseph Level 1

                Thanks for this comparison, BKKDon.  And Rob and Jeff, thanks for helpful perspective!

                 

                The pair of frames BKKDon shows, above, illustrate the reason I'm curious about the thinking behind "Adobe Standard": it seems like a moving target of sorts. It's similar from camera-to-camera, but noteworthy differences can be pretty apparent (as BKKDon shows us). It's a little flat and desaturated, but it's not "linear" or completely "uncooked"--so it's neither an attempt at a "finished" look (like the camera-specific calibration options are) nor an attempt at showing you untouched RAW. It's somewhere in between.

                 

                I'm fine with "use Adobe Standard if you like it, don't if you don't" as the camera calibration rule of thumb; and I really appreciate Adobe offering an independent perspective on color and tone perspective that's wholly theirs--that's not related to the camera manufacturers' ideas. If that's what Adobe Standard really is--a non-manufacturer, Adobe perspective on what your camera can do--then great! But if there's some other more specific rationale that helps Adobe arrive at that perspective, I'd love to hear more about it!

                 

                Thanks again, guys.

                • 6. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
                  thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                  MarkJoseph wrote:

                  I would find it *extremely* helpful if someone who's involved with the engineering behind Lightroom's color (or anyone else who's especially knowledgeable about Lightroom's design) might talk a little bit about why "Adobe Standard" looks the way it looks. What's it for? To what purposes can I leverage it?         

                  Adobe Stadnard is the name for the individual profiles Adobe builds for each camera it receives. A new camera ships, Adobe gets their hands on one and builds a profile with that sample. It isn't suppose to mimic the in-camera JPEG settings, I don't believe it's supposed to mimic anything but instead produce what is (and quotes are super important in this context) the most 'accurate' color response from the target they use to create the profile. But here's the rub. Not all cameras from the same make and model behave identically. Adobe simply can't get piles of the same body and build then average that response. So they provide a means for you to build your own custom DNG camera profile and for differing illuminates. So if you want to leverage it, you'd get a target (MacBeth 24 patch, X-rite Passport) and build your own custom profile. It can really help depending on how your sensor deviates from the sensor Adobe got to build their profiles.

                   

                  For more info on DNG profiles and rolling your own:

                  In this 30 minute video, we’ll look into the creation and use of DNG camera profiles in three raw converters. The video covers:

                   

                  What are DNG camera profiles, how do they differ from ICC camera profiles.

                  Misconceptions about DNG camera profiles.

                  Just when, and why do you need to build custom DNG camera profiles?

                  How to build custom DNG camera profiles using the X-rite Passport software.

                  The role of various illuminants on camera sensors and DNG camera profiles.

                  Dual Illuminant DNG camera profiles.

                  Examples of usage of DNG camera profiles in Lightroom, ACR, and Iridient Developer.

                   

                  Low Rez (YouTube):

                  http://youtu.be/_fikTm8XIt4

                   

                  High Rez (download):

                  http://www.digitaldog.net/files/DNG%20Camera%20profile%20video.mov

                  • 7. Re: What is the rationale behind the "Adobe Standard" color calibration profile?
                    Peter DL Level 1

                    I found this thread by searching for an answer exactly for the same question which the OP had asked.

                     

                    The accepted answer here was that the Adobe Standard profiles are made for "accurate" color response.

                     

                    Not sure - actually I don't think that this is correct.

                     

                    The Abobe Standard profiles include a LookTable

                    (just like the camera matching profiles). I think the name "LookTable" says it all, it is about a specific look deviating from "accuracy".

                     

                    When using the Adobe Standard profile as the Base Profile to create a custom profile with the Chart Wizard of the DNG Profile Editor, said LookTable gets automatically deleted. Unlike the HueSatDelta table which either gets added or is recalculated by the Chart Wizard.

                    My interpretation is that the Adobe Standard profile has an "accuracy part" which consists of the matrices and with newer Adobe Standard Profiles there is also a HueSatDelta table (actually 2 of it, just like with the two matrices for the 2 illuminants). And on the top comes the LookTable which is not about accuracy anymore.

                     

                    Hence, the question about the rationale behind the Adobe Standard profile

                    comes down to the question: what precisely the LookTable is meant to do (?).

                     

                    Comments and insights are appreciated.

                     

                    Peter

                     

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