2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 21, 2014 1:09 PM by 99jon

    Why use Lightroom 5 for CC?

    carehand

      I have just subscribed to the Photography package of CC. I've never used Lightroom before and I have my own developed system of computer photo storage so I don't need Lightroom for that. What else does it does and how does it compare to Camera Raw? I don't even know if the Photography package comes with ACR! I haven't even started using it yet!

       

      Looking for advice as to why I would use Lightroom. Can anyone share their opinion?

        • 1. Re: Why use Lightroom 5 for CC?
          dj_paige Level 9

          The photo editing algorithms in Lightroom are identical to ACR. Essentially, Lightroom and ACR are the same set of tools and algorithms.

           

          Lightroom is a workflow enhancement tool. It allows you to speed up operations regarding managing, developing and distribution operations by providing integrated tools to allow you to organize, edits, and publish/share your work. Naturally, you don't have to use ALL of those tools (I don't use Book or Web modules). Many people do most of their editing in Lightroom, and then send the photos to Photoshop for more advanced editing, the two softwares are integrated nicely.

           

          I have my own developed system of computer photo storage so I don't need Lightroom for that

          It might still be worth your time to investigate the tools in Lightroom, which provide more powerful organizational tools that what you can do with your operating system.

          • 2. Re: Why use Lightroom 5 for CC?
            99jon Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Hi Carey, LR was designed by photographers for photographers. If you are a graphic artist generating assets between In-Design and Photoshop the benefits of LR will be less apparent. As DJP says LR has the same raw engine as ACR ( except last update to graduated filter); so it’s like Bridge and Camera Raw combined into a single package enabling wedding photographers and other volume photographers to sort, edit and categorize images quickly and where necessary make bulk adjustments in a more intuitive interface than ACR.