10 Replies Latest reply: Aug 29, 2014 5:04 PM by alexdejesus RSS

    How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?

    alexdejesus Community Member

      A multi-track sequence brought over from Premiere, I have over a dozen clips from a funeral service video that need noise reduction.

      But, because it's a process effect, I can only work on one clip at a time. Furthermore, I may need to apply several passes of the NR effect to eliminate the noise without sounding weird.

      How then do I apply that effect (and its parameters) to the rest of the clips in the sequence?

       

      In Premiere, you can copy and paste effects (and their parameters) from one clip to another. There is no such thing in Audition that I can see.

        • 1. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
          ryclark Community Member

          When you have Captured a Noise Print you can save it within the Noise Reduction effect. Then having found your correct settings for the noise reduction you can save them as a Preset. You can also make your Noise Reduction settings a Favorite by clicking on the star icon at the top of the Noise Reduction effects window and reuse this on all the other clips..

           

          Another way to deal with the problem is to do a Mixdown in the Multitrack view to a single .wav file which you can then process all in one go.

          • 2. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
            alexdejesus Community Member

            Thanks for the tip! Then, if I have to do more than one pass at the NR Effect to get it right, I can save each pass as a preset? Sounds complicated, but I suppose it would work, huh?

             

            Since I have a dozen or so clips from the same camera on one track, I can select it and bounce to a new track, creating one continuous clip. Then apply the effect to it. Then do the same for the remaining tracks.

            • 3. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
              ryclark Community Member

              Depending on how you recorded your video on multiple cameras if it was a continuous shot on each then why not process the whole original file renaming the processed file the same as the original (but keep a copy of original with a different name for safety). It will then replace all the clips with the processed version.

               

              Alternatively if all the clips are separate files then you could use the Batch Process feature of Audition to process them all.

              • 4. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                Bob Howes MVP

                Even though this has been marked as solved I feel the need to comment.

                 

                Unless your situation is VERY unusual, it's pretty unlikely that a noise print captured from one clip and the settings you use based on that will give optimum results when applied to a different clip.

                 

                Batch process?  Maybe but finding the best place to capture a typical noise print sometimes involves judgement.

                 

                There are certain things where the best results can be gained by simply "doing it" rather than spending time looking for shortcuts.  I could probably have done 3 or 4 levels of noise reduction on one of your dozen clips in the time it took to type this.

                • 5. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                  alexdejesus Community Member

                  You are right. But my point was how to apply an effect (or layers of effects) across multiple similar clips on a timeline. You mentioned doing 3 or 4 levels of noise reduction on a clip. if you have one or two dozen clips shot in the same location with the same camera, what do you do?

                   

                  if there is a batch process, I don't see it.

                  • 6. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                    SteveG(AudioMasters) Community Member

                    You probably won't like this much...

                    Alex DeJesus wrote:

                     

                    You are right. But my point was how to apply an effect (or layers of effects) across multiple similar clips on a timeline. You mentioned doing 3 or 4 levels of noise reduction on a clip. if you have one or two dozen clips shot in the same location with the same camera, what do you do?

                     

                    if there is a batch process, I don't see it.

                    Batch processing is a waveform view function, but I don't think that this is the answer at all, I'm afraid. Your problem is more fundamental than that, and really requires a processing rethink. Editing happens at a relatively late stage in the programme assembly, and you shouldn't be attempting to do basic processing like NR at this stage at all. It's been the norm for a very long time now that you do basic processing like NR, etc first, and assemble material that is at least basically usable. This actually makes the editing process much easier, and invariably leaves you with far less tweaking and difficult processing. Even performing NR and basic cleanup on all of your rushes will take you less time and effort than playing around with the final result ever will, and often you don't have to go that far at all...

                    • 7. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                      Bob Howes MVP

                      Alex DeJesus wrote:

                       

                      You are right. But my point was how to apply an effect (or layers of effects) across multiple similar clips on a timeline. You mentioned doing 3 or 4 levels of noise reduction on a clip. if you have one or two dozen clips shot in the same location with the same camera, what do you do?

                       

                      if there is a batch process, I don't see it.

                      Unless the audio is at exactly the same level and the camera pointed the same direction for every clip, I grab a series of new noise samples and run the NR process multiple times.  Unless the clips are incredibly long, doing 2 dozen clips (though it was a dozen in your original post) 4 times each would probably take me about 2 hours and two mugs of tea.  Two hours is a small amount in the time it takes to edit something properly and the improved results would, to me, make it worthwhile.

                       

                      Don't get me wrong, the idea of copying settings to use a process on multiple clips is a good one which on most effects I accomplish by storing the settings as a named preset and calling them up as often as needed.  However, if you are doing multiple passes with new noise prints each time (for the best result), this would save very little time indeed.

                       

                      At the risk of sound condescending, the real way to solve this is to record the sound properly (and close up) on location to avoid the need for Noise Reduction at all.  NR should be a last resort, not a standard part of the production work flow.

                      • 8. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                        C.Salmassy Community Member

                        Hi, Alex.

                         

                        It seems you want to do some broadband de-noise processing. While one can do a noisefloor sampling from one clip and apply it to others (great for when you have multiple takes from the same setup), it may be best to noise sample each individually if the mic has moved position enough to cause the tonal characteristics to change.

                         

                        An example would be if on-screen talent is walking in an outdoor location. In one part of the location, a particular section of the clip has a lot of BG traffic noise. Another recording has a fountain in the BG - while it still may have some of the traffic in it, the predominant BG noisefloor is "strong fountain/weak traffic", so like others have mentioned, it makes more sense to make a new BG sampling to match the characteristics of this clip.

                         

                        All that being said, here is how you BATCH PROCESS / broadband de-noise a bunch of clips, it's a 4-tiered / 21-step process when starting from scratch.

                                                      NOTE: there is a manual cheat after the Batch Processing lesson - skip to that if you wish

                         

                        (WARNING - this type of processing is most successful if the file has been EQ'd or gain boosted (if needed) before processing. This is also true for the noisefloor sample. It should be taken from the pre-adjusted clip so that it all matches level)

                         

                        1) find / open a source clip that best represents the BG noisefloor you wish to sample as your broadband source for processing,

                        then in the WAVEFORM editor window press alt-shift-C to save this selection as a new file - give it a unique name that represents its function

                             a. ideally, this selection will be more than 5000 samples

                             b. should be free of non-BG noise sounds (Dx, footsteps, mouth sounds, it should sound like a very short ambiance loop)

                         

                        2) with your new sample saved and your source clip still open in the UI:

                             a. load your noise print file

                             b. adjust the Noise Reduction and Reduce by  sliders (I suggest you start with a noise reduction value of 100% with a reduce value of 3 to 6 dB)

                             c. under Advanced Settings, set Spectral to 0%, Smoothing to 20, Precision to 7, and Transition width to 2dB - these settings

                                 are like painting not with a wide brush but with a thinner brush, which means less cancellation of frequencies you want to keep and less artifacting

                             d. toggle on/off the Output Noise Only function to see just what you are subtracting in your process - a great way to make adjustments until your

                                 noisefloor-only sound is free of Dx and other Production sounds

                             e. optional advanced step - in the process UI Frequency window, you can draw a curve to select the frequency ranges that will be processed - this is another

                                 way of "thinning the brush" so that you are NOT processing where it's not needed in the broadband range - i.e. hiss from a low-quality mic,

                                 open the FA window [alt-Z] to see realtime Freq. Analysis on playback of your clip with the processing;

                                 adjust your settings and the curve in the window to counter the frequency range of the noisefloor - this process is like alchemy, wicked awesome

                             f. once you're happy with your settings,  click the Save Effects Preset button (down-arrow on hard-drive) next to the Presets pulldown button.

                                       do NOT apply your process yet - that's the next step

                         

                        3) now, you're going to create the Favorite that the Batch Process will use to process your clips

                             a. select Favorites / Start Recording Favorite (every user function of the software is now being recorded into a macro)

                             b. in the Noise Reduction UI, click the Load Noise Print button and select your saved file

                             c. now, select your preset from the pulldown menu

                             d. click the Select Entire File button below the UI Freq. window

                             e. click Apply

                             f. click Favorites / Stop Recording Favorite


                        4) now, under EDIT, select Batch Process

                             a. select your new Favorite from the pulldown tab

                             b. drag and drop the files into the Batch window or load them from the Load button in the upper left of the Batch window

                             c. click the Export Settings button in the bottom left

                             d. set any pre/postfix labeling additions (this works a lot like Adobe Bridge's Batch Rename tool - amending the original filename to differentiate

                             e. set a NEW save location to isolate the files

                             f. set the format / type / bitrate  (best to keep the original format or a higher quality); when finished, click OK

                             g. in the lower right corner, click the RUN button and watch the magic right before your eyes

                         

                        [HERE IS THE CHEAT]

                        Now that you're learned the magic of batch processing (FYI a new favorite can contain / execute multiple existing effect processes), here is what I recently did in a doc with interview footage - guys in front of a green screen with a less than perfect sound environment.

                         

                        1) in Multitrack mode, double-click your clip to process

                        2) in Waveform mode, select the noisefloor area to sample and type shift-P

                        3) type ctrl-shift-P to open the UI - adjust your De-noise settings for ALL of your processing

                        4) type ctrl-A to select the entire file

                        5) click Apply; type ctrl-shift-S to save this processed file (I add "_PROC") as an alternate to the original which still exists should you want to go back to it easily - the ALT file will be in the multitrack timeline

                        6) type G (de-select I/O area) then type F12 key - returns to Multitrack mode

                        7) double-click your next clip to process and repeat steps 3-7 until finished (you won't need to tweak the settings in 3 after the initial step 3)

                        In 3-5 minutes, you're Done!

                         

                         

                        I discovered another layer of coolness within Audition regarding CLIP Effects Racks where one can setup a stack of effects, save as a User Preset, and apply them to either an individual clip, a set of clips, or to a track.  This is great when you want to apply, for example, a Parametric EQ for filtering an outdoor location or boosting a lav mic's High Freq. Shelf for addition sibilance PLUS a Tube-modeled Compressor to handle dynamics...you spend a lot of time tweaking the settings "just right", and now you want to apply to more than one clip on a track.

                         

                        In a short film I'm working on, I use this technique to apply EQ and Room Ambiance (reverb) to camera perspective changes on a single track of ADR for off-camera Dx.  I place the Dx in a track. Splice on the camera edits to make unique clips, select the Audio Perspective preset I made for each camera angle, and Voila!

                         

                        Have fun!

                         

                        -CS

                        • 9. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                          alexdejesus Community Member

                          Wow! Thanks all for the tips. Plenty to chew on here.

                          • 10. Re: How Do You Apply Process Effects To Multiple Clips In A Multi-Track?
                            alexdejesus Community Member

                            Bob, a little condescension is good for the soul. I botched the recording from the start by not having the adapter I needed to plug into the house sound board. It was a memorial service in a large church. Although I always mix in ambient sound to make the video realistic, this one is totally ambient. The noise is mostly fixable, but someone got up to speak and was barely audible. I thought that it would be best to remove some noise BEFORE boosting volume - especially for this one speaker. Otherwise, all I'd be doing is boosting the noise. But some of the more seasoned people here seem to think it best to get the volume up first.