8 Replies Latest reply on Sep 8, 2014 5:50 AM by jasonvp

    Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro

    Felipe Barreto

      Hey guys,  I have a terrible doubt abt my hardware..

      I have

      -i5 4th generation

      -8gb ram

      -GPU GTX570 CUDA 480

      Standard Memory Config 1280 MB GDDR5

      Memory Interface Width 320-bit

       

      I'm aware that this is not the best of pc of the world.. but I need to edit videos  as Mov, MTS, natives formats of cameras.. I want to improve my PC. Which is better to invest Processor or GPU? I wanna improve my workflow,

      preview better with effects etc.

      Some Help please.

      Thank you!

        • 1. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
          cc_merchant Level 4

          Step 1: Get an i7 CPU with 4 cores + hyper threading.

          Step 2: Increase memory to 16 or 32 GB.

          Step 3: Improve your disk setup.

          Step 4: Tune your system (free).

          Step 5: Overclock the system (free).

           

          Keep the 570. It is perfectly OK, even after these 5 steps..

          • 2. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            cc_merchant has it correct!

             

            For a great CPU checkout the i7-4790K or if you are near a Microcenter store and you or a friend can get into the "in store only pricing" is only $280!  Check to see if your motherboard supports this quite new CPU and  see if you need a BIOS upgrade to use it.

            • 3. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
              GlueFactoryBJJ

              Bill/cc_merchant,

               

              So you are saying that there is a limit to the number of Cuda cores that Pr will use?  That going from 480 cores to 1536 (or more) will not show any appreciable improvement in rendering speed?  Especially without knowing whether or not his CPU is maxed while rendering or what kinds of effects he is using?

               

              I ask this because (1) I really want to understand where the best bang for my buck rendering is going to go and (2) I'm in a similar position to Felipe.  I need to upgrade because my render times are out of control.  I try to stick to effects that benefit from GPU rendering and believe that is the direction Adobe is going and that, eventually, in so far as they can be adapted, all effects will eventually benefit from GPU rendering.  Am I way off base here?

               

              I have a similar GPU (560ti, 1GB, Pr GPU .txt hack), but other parts of my system are significantly different (i7-3770, 16GB, RAID 0 SSD OS and Rendering drives).  I need to do something because my render times are way longer than I think they should be these days (up to 4:1 render time to display time (or MUCH more with Neat denoise, which is supposed to be Cuda core capable)).

               

              I cannot find any definitive information regarding what Pr benefits from and what its limitations are.  For example, is there a limit to the number of Cuda cores that Pr will use (effectively) and are more cores more important than more VRAM?  Especially in light of the relatively huge VRAM available on Quadro cards.  What is the recommended minimum VRAM that any Cuda card should have these days, especially in light of future capabilities, such as 4K and/or built-in effects.

               

              Thanks for any light you can shed on this subject because I haven't been able to find any!  I'm on a limited budget and can't afford to spend $2-5K on an "ultimate" system.

               

              Scott

               

              PS. I don't believe in overclocking because it (1) can cause hard to track instability problems and (2) increases temperatures and every 10-15% increase in temp, results in about 1/2 the life expectancy of the components.

              • 5. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
                GlueFactoryBJJ Level 1

                Thanks so much!  This is exactly what I've been looking for!

                 

                Scott

                 

                PS. And now I know why Bill's name looked so familiar...

                • 6. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
                  Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  You keep saying rendering when I think you mean exporting.  If you want to find out how your system is really performing run the Premiere Pro BenchMark (CS6, CC and CC 2014).  You do not tell us what your media is currently but for 4K and higher you will need lots of video RAM.  Many of the plugin's like your denoiser are not well multithreaded and most are not GPU assisted.  Take a look at GPU-Z and see how much load it is using.  You only have 1 GB of video RAM, if the media you are using needs more video RAM it will default back to CPU only processing.

                   

                  My main editing rig is an old X58 motherboard well overclocked and still running strong after 4 1/2 years.

                  • 7. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
                    JFPhoton Level 3

                    ....regarding your i5 system....it is time to place it on an ice flow, and wave a tearful goodbye to it as it drifts off into the distance and joins the endless flow of deceased electronics that is overwhelming our planet.  The proper system has just been released, and is being thoroughly tested right here on this forum by Eric Bowen.... the Haswell E , X99 chipset destop system....THAT is what you want !!!  Check it out.....even the cheaper 6 core version does well. If budget is a concern, the 4930K CPU is now a bargain with good performance.

                    • 8. Re: Hardware and GPU editing in Premiere Pro
                      jasonvp Level 3

                      GlueFactoryBJJ wrote:

                      PS. I don't believe in overclocking because it (1) can cause hard to track instability problems and (2) increases temperatures and every 10-15% increase in temp, results in about 1/2 the life expectancy of the components.

                      The others pretty much have your questions taken care of, but I wanted to address this fallacy:  overclocking properly does nothing of the sort.  If you feed the chip enough voltage AND you keep it cool enough, it won't know any difference between running at its OEM speed or an overclocked one.  It'll be perfectly stable and run just as long as it would at stock speeds.