5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 1, 2014 5:06 PM by MW Design

    What's Adobe's rationale?

    Manikandan Baluchamy

      We've crossed the era where PDFs were considered to be the best formats for printing. The world is now interacting with PDFs on the go where they are used to do things more than what hard copies of paper could do. With such rich interactivity happening around why wouldn't Adobe support animated gifs?

        • 1. Re: What's Adobe's rationale?
          BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          Adobe does not own or control the PDF specification.

          • 2. Re: What's Adobe's rationale?
            Steve Werner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            First, you're not talking to Adobe here. We are InDesign users, just like you.

             

            Second, as far as I know animated gifs are primarily used in web output. InDesign is not a good choice for web output. It is a good choice for print, interactive PDF, EPUB and tablet apps, but none of those use animated gifs, as far as I know.

             

            If you think you can make a case for why it should be included submit a feature request here:

             

            Adobe - Feature Request/Bug Report Form

            • 3. Re: What's Adobe's rationale?
              Sandee Cohen Adobe Community Professional

              In addition to Steve's comments, here is my 2¢ worth.


              We've crossed the era where PDFs were considered to be the best formats for printing.

              We have? What format are print shops now asking for? I believe almost 98% of print shops ask for PDF files for books, magazines, brochures, posters, packaging, newspapers, point-of-sale displays, and much more. But I really would love to know what format you think they're using.


              The world is now interacting with PDFs on the go where they are used to do things more than what hard copies of paper could do.

              Totally agree. Our book on Digital Publishing with InDesign CC with Diane Burns (to be published this fall) outlines all the formats that can come out from InDesign in non-paper formats: interactive PDF, ePub (reflowable), ePub (fixed layout), DPS apps for tablets, and SWF. But that doesn't mean print PDf is dead.


              With such rich interactivity happening around why wouldn't Adobe support animated gifs?

              Why waste time/energy/resources/etc. on animated gifs which are rudimentary versions of videos? The animated gifs I've seen on websites are simply there to make funny statements using jerky, repetitive, small images that look horrible.

              Of course Adobe does support animated gifs from Photoshop. But what benefit would you get from InDesign exporting such a format? Or did you have something else in mind?


              But to repeat Steve, if you really want more support for animated gifs, fill out a feature request. And try to follow the advice given by the InDesign Group Product Manager, Chris Kitchener. Don't just tell Adobe what feature you want. And don't tell Adobe what interest there is in such a feature. Tell Adobe what workflow would be made easier with that feature. Would it save you time, image quality, money, or something else?

              • 4. Re: What's Adobe's rationale?
                Manikandan Baluchamy Level 1

                I meant to say: We've crossed the era where PDFs were considered to be the best formats for printing ONLY. Apologize for the miss. I'm with you there.

                I do agree that gifs are rudimentary. Me being an IXD who shares screen flows to the outside world using PDFs built on InDesign, I rely heavily on Photoshop for building transition effects esp. for mobile based mockups. While InDesign does offer some animation features it becomes quite complicated to export it to SWF and placing it back. Also, most of the time the quality of the playback becomes compromised. Not sure if its just me.


                While there are many alternative tools that perhaps can do the job, I'm just another guy who is quite attached to Adobe for my own reasons.


                I'm certainly thankful for your advise.


                • 5. Re: What's Adobe's rationale?
                  MW Design Level 4

                  If the PDF spec ever did allow for an animated file format, APNG would be better simply because of the resolution and color. Really, it would likely be more likely (non are really likely), HTML5 animation would be the ticket.

                   

                  But, it won't happen. It really isn't within the purview of PDFs. Interactivity really is going the way of (currently) ePubs. Looking forward to seeing the book, Sandee.

                   

                  Mike