7 Replies Latest reply on Sep 3, 2014 1:49 PM by sinious

    Best Image Quality?

    mrm5102 Level 1

      Hello All,

       

      Just had a quick question...

      For Images/Bitmaps in my library, what would be the best quality, JPEG at 100% Quality or Lossless?

       

      I am assuming Lossless will give you the best result, but I just wanted to be sure.

       

      *EDIT: After just reading something on Bitmap Properties, it says to use Photo Compression if the image contains gradients, complex colors and tonal variations... My Images, which are the backgrounds to each frame, use Gradients in each one... So does that mean I should use "Photo (JPEG)" compression and set it to 100%..?

       

      Thanks in Advance,

      Matt

        • 1. Re: Best Image Quality?
          sinious Most Valuable Participant

          PNG is compression, just lossless. The format still compresses the file size down. JPEG at 100% also compresses the image down, but will be essentially the same, lossless. JPEG being spatial may adjust a pixel or two due to the block compression nature but you shouldn't be able to tell the difference with the naked eye unless you're zooming in beyond 100% (say, stretching to 200% size).

           

          In either case I'd always choose PNG. Toggle the transparency off for a small savings on the alpha channel and you'll know the picture is identical. It's universal utility (like being able to use transparency if you choose) is worth the marginal image size savings.

           

          That said, be sure you use the right tool to manage the image before even importing. I can make a PNG of the same exact size that's 6MB or use the Save for Web, PNG 24bit no transparency option and bring it down to ~1MB, lossless.

           

          Either one you choose, If you resize those images at all in Flash, be sure to tick off smoothing in the images properties.

          • 2. Re: Best Image Quality?
            mrm5102 Level 1

            Hey sinious, thanks for the quick reply!

             

            Ok, that all makes sense... Thanks.

             

            Yea I used Gimp to create my backgrounds, which are saved as .xcf and then I export them from Gimp as .bmp images before I import them into Flash...

             

            Thanks Again for the reply, much appreciated!

            -Matt

            • 3. Re: Best Image Quality?
              sinious Most Valuable Participant

              BMP is not just a lossless format, it's also entirely uncompressed (meaning huge files). You should export them from GiMP as PNG first, then import them. You'll save yourself a ton of file space.

              • 4. Re: Best Image Quality?
                mrm5102 Level 1

                Ok, thanks for the tip! I'll try re-exporting them from Gimp as PNG's and see how that goes!

                 

                Thanks Again!

                 

                -Matt

                • 5. Re: Best Image Quality?
                  sinious Most Valuable Participant

                  You're welcome and good luck!

                  • 6. Re: Best Image Quality?
                    mrm5102 Level 1

                    Wow, were you right about the png or what lol....

                    I exported each Frame Background from the original xcf (*Gimp's native format) to png, and there is a huge difference between the bmp and png sizes.

                     

                    Each image file went from about 7.5<--->8.0 MB range down to 1.0<--->1.8 MB range. And from simply just viewing the images side-by-side I can't really tell a difference... So I'm going to use the png's as you suggested...

                     

                    Thanks again for the advice, much appreciated!

                     

                    Thanks,

                    Matt

                    • 7. Re: Best Image Quality?
                      sinious Most Valuable Participant

                      PNG is lossless, just like BMP. Colorspaces are about the only difference you could see. If you tell your export tool of choice to abide by a certain color space (sRGB, your monitor, etc) then the colors might differ slightly. Between BMP and PNG however, you will see no block compression. So no pixel density difference.

                       

                      You're welcome and good luck!