8 Replies Latest reply on Sep 6, 2014 8:30 AM by Butch_M

    Looking for DAM case studies/best practices

    jmcg2222

      I just began working at school and we have a TON of old photos. My advice is just to permanently archive older photographs and begin fresh with Lightroom and a good digital asset management policy.

       

      I know there are resources and tutorials on DAM with Lightroom, but I'm looking for examples of how other institutions, schools, organizations and non-profits are using Lightroom and Bridge. Anyone know if any place where I can find something like this?

        • 1. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
          Butch_M Level 4

          Get the most recent version (Third Edition) of The DAM Book by Peter Krogh. (Available at the usual sources) Study it and season to taste. You don't have to follow it verbatim ... but it offers exceptional advice for building an image archive that is scalable and can stand the test of time.

          • 2. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
            thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

            I agree, get Peter's book. And yes, season to taste as everyone has to come up with a system that makes sense to them.

            • 3. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
              john beardsworth Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Butch_M wrote:

               

              Get the most recent version (Third Edition) of The DAM Book by Peter Krogh. (Available at the usual sources) Study it and season to taste. You don't have to follow it verbatim ... but it offers exceptional advice for building an image archive that is scalable and can stand the test of time.

               

              The Third Edition hasn't been published yet, but the second edition is still available (also see Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5 ) and should help you distinguish good from bad practices.

              • 4. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
                jmcg2222 Level 1

                So let me throw this out there and see what you all think. I work at a small college and they continually amass tons of photos mostly jpegs from a an old Canon Rebel.

                 

                Do other folks house all photos and export them as necessary? I assume most people these days are shooting raw and that's what I'll likely have us switch to.

                 

                But say you have 200 photos from an event. I understand how to import, tag and all that. But what happens when the graphic designer needs a 5 x7 300dpi PSD/Tiff of photo-123 and the web master needs a 350px wide jpeg of photo-98 in black and white.

                 

                When web and print projects pop up, do you still manage those assets in Lightroom? Or is that where you manage project assets based on the project?

                • 5. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
                  dj_paige Level 9

                  Do other folks house all photos and export them as necessary? I assume most people these days are shooting raw and that's what I'll likely have us switch to.

                  Yes, you would want the DAM to manage all of your photos, and export them as necessary. The issue of RAW vs JPG is completely independent of any DAM decisions.

                  But say you have 200 photos from an event. I understand how to import, tag and all that. But what happens when the graphic designer needs a 5 x7 300dpi PSD/Tiff of photo-123 and the web master needs a 350px wide jpeg of photo-98 in black and white.

                  You create a virtual copy in Lightroom for each different size, do the proper crop of the virtual copies, convert the appropriate one to black and white, and then export and deliver to the recipient. (And by the way, it's 300 PPI, not 300 DPI)

                   

                  When web and print projects pop up, do you still manage those assets in Lightroom? Or is that where you manage project assets based on the project?

                  Yes, of course you do. What is the point of the DAM if you choose to manage some assets outside of Lightroom and some assets inside of Lightroom?

                  • 6. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
                    Butch_M Level 4

                    Yes, your Library/Archive would serve as a repository for all the images you wish to retain access to.

                     

                    The file type or the resulting exported images, regardless of end use, is really inconsequential. Lightroom does not care what file types you add to your DAM workflow or end use you desire. (As long as they are supported file types of course) While Lr has very capable RAW processor, jpegs can feel quite at home in Lr as well.

                     

                    As long as you properly rate, label, flag and keyword your images so you and others using the Library can easily access the desired images upon request, you''ll be fine.

                     

                    I concur with dj that Virtual copies are the recommended path for sharing/exporting images for various uses. It allows you the luxury of additional "copies" of images without the related storage concerns.

                    • 7. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
                      dj_paige Level 9

                      I would like to state that I am uncomfortable with jmcg2222's phrase "Do other folks house all photo", specifically the word "house"; and I am uncomfortable with Butch_M's phrase "your Library/Archive would serve as a repository". Lightroom does not "house" photos, nor does Lightroom "serve as a respository". Lightroom is a database, plus thumbnails/previews, but it never contains your photos themselves. The photos are "housed" on your hard disk(s) somewhere, wherever you put them or wherever you instructed Lightroom to put them. The repository for your photos is your hard disk(s), it is not the DAM, it is not Lightroom.

                      • 8. Re: Looking for DAM case studies/best practices
                        Butch_M Level 4

                        Yes, semantically speaking, Lr does not physically house nor is it an actual physical repository for image files. For those uncomfortable with certain terms ... they should request that Adobe address all other troubling terminology in their software so we all can feel a bit more comfortable ... since we don't actually import images into Lr (other than graphic identity plates and graphic watermarks) ... we merely reference those files in Lr. Perhaps Adobe could label that button/action more accurately as a start.

                         

                        If we do not physically import photos into Lr, then what use is there to have a button for the function of Export? If we didn't actually import any images into Lr ... how is it possible to export an image out of Lr? Or, how about the fact that the Camera Calibration panel does not actually calibrate cameras for another? ... but I digress ...

                         

                        Indeed, from a physical standpoint, the files we manage using Lr are not actually stored inside the  Lr catalog ... however, all the extremely valuable camera generated EXIF and IPTC along with user generated metadata is stored in a repository that is known as the .lrcat file. Of course, one should not confuse that this repository has any actual images stored within.

                         

                        While it may be preferred, and more comfortable, to be perfectly accurate in discussing such terms, we can also drown in a sea of semantic minutiae if we all insist on picking nits with such phrases used in the discussion as well.