3 Replies Latest reply on Sep 11, 2014 10:16 AM by dj_paige

    Is adjusting permissions for LightRoom based archive management worthwhile?

    nonovsco

      I'm trying to set up an archive that is managed through a LightRoom Catalog. I was wondering if anyone has done this before and adjusted the permissions of their files to read only to ensure that LightRoom Catalog metadata changes do not alter or get saved to files.

       

      I plan to have the archive set up in 3 locations with copies of the LightRoom Catalog. I will need to be able to add keywords and collections to a catalog at 2 of the locations. I am interested in using permissions to ensure that the catalog is the only file that needs to travel between the locations. I don't want to get into a situation in which altering the LightRoom Catalog might alter files and necessitate that I either save new metadata to files with each keyword/collection addition or that I regularly synchronize the entire archive to ensure all 3 copies of the archive are mirrors of one another.

       

      I have three serious concerns about the longterm viability of managing file permissions:

      1. I worry that it will be difficult to manage the user/s who have the privileges to manage these permissions and that it will be difficult to do so in different locations and on different computers

      2. I worry about whether permissions management might introduce some form of file corruption

      3. I worry about the time involved in altering an entire archives worth of permissions to read only and the time involved in reversing this every time I want to unarchive content for new projects

       

      I have also posted this question to Luminous Landscape here: Adjusting Permissions for LightRoom Catalog Based Archive Managment. Worthwhile?

        • 1. Re: Is adjusting permissions for LightRoom based archive management worthwhile?
          dj_paige Level 9

          ... and adjusted the permissions of their files to read only to ensure that LightRoom Catalog metadata changes do not alter or get saved to files.

          By default, Lightroom does not write anything to your photo files. Of course, there's no way to prevent a user from changing this default behavior and writing information to the files. I suppose making the directories read-only helps, but people could still change that. If the directories are on a server, then only the server admin could change the permissions.

           

          2. I worry about whether permissions management might introduce some form of file corruption

           

          I never heard of such a thing, but this is an operating system issue, not a Lightroom issue.

           

          I worry about the time involved in altering an entire archives worth of permissions to read only and the time involved in reversing this every time I want to unarchive content for new projects

          I don't think you understand how Lightroom works. There would be no need to reverse anything to "unarchive" the content  — although in my opinion, the idea of "archiving" content in the first place doesn't feel right ... if the photos are imported into Lightroom at one time, leave them in Lightroom, don't go through an archive process removing the photos from Lightroom followed by unarchive process, that is something that is ineffective and causes numerous problems with non-expert users. When you import photos into Lightroom, the photos still remain on your hard disk somewhere, Lightroom does not actually keep a copy of the photo. Lightroom keeps pointers to the photo's locations and stores any metadata and edits. Removing a photo from Lightroom (archiving) is the equivalent of deleting the metadata and edits, and I cannot see a reason to do that.

           

          So, bottom line, to answer your title question, "Is adjusting permissions for Lightroom based archive management worthwhile?" — without further discussion of your setup and goals, I see no reason to even spend your time on this, unless you are the server admin of the location where the photos are stored, in which case then the answer is go right ahead and make them read-only.

          • 2. Re: Is adjusting permissions for LightRoom based archive management worthwhile?
            nonovsco Level 1

            dj_paige wrote:

            I don't think you understand how Lightroom works. There would be no need to reverse anything to "unarchive" the content  — although in my opinion, the idea of "archiving" content in the first place doesn't feel right ... if the photos are imported into Lightroom at one time, leave them in Lightroom, don't go through an archive process removing the photos from Lightroom followed by unarchive process, that is something that is ineffective and causes numerous problems with non-expert users. When you import photos into Lightroom, the photos still remain on your hard disk somewhere, Lightroom does not actually keep a copy of the photo. Lightroom keeps pointers to the photo's locations and stores any metadata and edits. Removing a photo from Lightroom (archiving) is the equivalent of deleting the metadata and edits, and I cannot see a reason to do that.

            I don't think my point was clear here. This was more about the logistics of managing permissions then about LightRoom. If all of my archived images are set to read only and I copy few images to a working space WITHOUT removing them from my archive system or from my LightRoom Catalog I will want to be able to change those permissions so I can perhaps edit them and use them for a new project.

            • 3. Re: Is adjusting permissions for LightRoom based archive management worthwhile?
              dj_paige Level 9

              Your point remains unclear.

              If all of my archived images are set to read only and I copy few images to a working space WITHOUT removing them

              Why would you want to copy a few images? In Lightroom, there is in fact NO copy function anyway.

               

              You don't need to change permissions to edit photos or use them in a new project. You don't need to "copy photos to a working space" to edit them or use them in a project