1 Reply Latest reply on Oct 8, 2014 8:34 AM by Anit_Kumar

    CF 10 & 11 Licensing on Virtual Machines

    jamiejaxon

      I have been trying to get an answer out of Adobe for months, but have gotten the runaround.

       

      Here's the question I've been asking. We have many licenses we need to upgrade before core support ends. If we don't get answers, we may be forced to use another vendor.

      I needed to clarify a finer point of the ColdFusion licensing for both v9 and v10.

       

      From the v10's license agreement (http://wwwimages.adobe.com/www.adobe.com/content/dam/Adobe/en/legal/licenses-terms/pdf/Adobe%20ColdFusion%C2%AE%2010.pdf ):


      1.5 “CPU” is each distinct central processing unit (physical or virtual) within the Computer capable of independently manipulating and operating the Software. Each CPU may contain one or multiple processing cores. The total number of cores operating the Software in the Computer may not exceed the licensed quantity, and will be greater of the exact number of cores operating the Software in the case when Licensee configures the Computer (using a reliable and verifiable means of hardware or software partitioning) such that the total number of CPU cores that actually operate the Software is less than the total number of cores on that Computer, or, (ii) the sum of all the cores contained in every pCPU on the Computer. The total number of CPUs in a Computer will then be calculated by dividing the total number of cores operating the Software by 4, rounded up to the next whole number in case the quotient of the division by 4 is not an integer. For example, if the total number of cores operating the Software is 12, then the total number of CPUs equals 3; if the total number of cores operating the Software is 14, then the total number of CPUs equals 4.


      A couple things:

       

      1. I can't figure out when scenario would ever be the greater of and (ii). It seems like (ii) would always be greater (so why even mention "i"). Could you explain that?
      2. Say I have a physical machine with a ton of processor cores. Let's say in total, the machine has 32 cores. However, on that machine (host) is running a guest VM which is restricted to only 8 of the host's 32 cores. Since a single enterprise license covers 2 CPUs (or 8 cores, as defined in another section of the license), and the VM uses only 8 of the host's 32 physical cores, I would think the spirit of the license would say that I just need a single license. Is this true?
      Thanks,

       

      Jamie