3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 4, 2006 5:25 AM by Newsgroup_User

    IE displays my pages differently

    sbell2200 Level 1
      I've just started to use div's and layers on my second website design, and on one
      computer using IE 6, the flash movie on my homepage shows up to high on the page
      (over the navigation bar). On another computer, the development machine, also
      running IE 6, it looks fine both in Firefox and IE. The computer with the problem is
      set to a lower display resolution. The fonts in my Nav bar also display larger on that PC.

      Any tips as to what's going on would be appreciated. The url is www.pulversbriar.com

      -steve
        • 1. Re: IE displays my pages differently
          Level 7
          Look at the pages on a couple of more computers. If others are OK then the
          problem is with one computer.

          Go to the problem computer and look at the browser menu item View > Text
          Size. Typically it is set to Medium. If changing this setting breaks your
          page then it is not 'Well Designed.'

          --
          Alan C
          alan (a t) cates-associates (d ot) net
          http://www.cates-associates.net
          "sbell2200" <webforumsuser@macromedia.com> wrote in message
          news:e8caq1$pej$1@forums.macromedia.com...
          > I've just started to use div's and layers on my second website design, and
          > on
          > one
          > computer using IE 6, the flash movie on my homepage shows up to high on
          > the
          > page
          > (over the navigation bar). On another computer, the development machine,
          > also
          > running IE 6, it looks fine both in Firefox and IE. The computer with the
          > problem is
          > set to a lower display resolution. The fonts in my Nav bar also display
          > larger on that PC.
          >
          > Any tips as to what's going on would be appreciated. The url is
          > www.pulversbriar.com
          >
          > -steve
          >


          • 2. Re: IE displays my pages differently
            sbell2200 Level 1
            thanks for those helpful suggestions. I tried it on two more PC's, it is just a problem
            on that one PC, and she has the font size set to the maximum possible. I'm wondering,
            do I need to set font sizes using em's, or some other trick, in order for my page to scale
            more gracefully? I'd like to learn how to follow good design practices.

            Also, could you clear up a misunderstanding for me? In learning CSS, I finally really "got"
            what a "div" is, and then made the leap (I thought) in getting what a layer is. I had decided
            that a layer is just a div pair with absolute positioning specified. Was my logic flawed?
            I want to make sure I understand the different properties of each and how they relate.

            I layed out this page using layers. I notice in CSS tutorials that layers don't come up as much,
            just the div sections then somehow things (seem to) magically fall into the right place on the
            page by "floating" them. As you can see, i'm still struggling a bit with the basic CSS concepts.
            I do understand how CSS modifies tags, a bit about classes, how the external style sheet works.
            But the div vs layer thing is still a bit fuzzy.

            thanks again,

            -steve
            • 3. Re: IE displays my pages differently
              Level 7
              > Was my logic flawed?

              Nope. In DW a layer is ANYTHING with absolute positioning, though, not just
              a div tag. So, for example, this could be considered a layer in DW -

              <p style="position:absolute; top:50px; left:200px;">Lookee!</p>

              > I want to make sure I understand the different properties of each and how
              > they
              > relate.

              This may help you understand positioning a bit -

              There are 4 different types of positioning:
              Absolute
              Relative
              Fixed
              Static

              Here is a brief explanation of each kind of positioning (with regard to
              placement of elements on the page only)....

              Position:absolute (or A/P elements)
              -----------------------
              This does several things -
              1. It 'removes' the element from the flow of the code on the� page so that
              it can no longer influence the size or position of any other pa�ge element
              (except for those contained within it, of course).

              2. The absolutely positioned element takes its position from the position of
              its closest PA�RENT *positioned* element - in the absence of any explicitly
              positioned parent, this will default to the <body> tag, which is always
              positioned
              �at 0,0 in the browser viewport.

              This means that it doesn't matter where in the HTML code the laye�r's code
              appears (between <body> and </body>), its location on the screen will not
              change (this assumes that you have not positioned the A/P element within
              a table or another A/P element, of course). Furthe�rmore, the space in
              which
              this element would have appeared were it not positi�oned is not preserved
              on the screen. In other words, absolutely positioned elements don't take
              up any space on the page. In fact, they FLOAT over the page.

              Position:relative (or R/P elements)
              ----------------------
              In contrast to absolute positioning, a relatively positioned page element is
              *not* removed from t�he flow of the code on the page, so it will use the
              spot
              where it would have� appeared based on its position in the code as its
              zero point reference. If� you then supply top, right, bottom, or left
              positions
              to the style for this �element, those values will be used as offsets from
              its
              zero point.

              This means that it DOES matter where in the code the relativ�ely positioned
              element appears (, as it will be positioned in that location (�factoring in
              the offsets) on the screen (this is true for any placement in the code).
              Furthermore, the space where this e�lement would have appeared is
              preserved in the display, and can therefore� affect the placement of
              succeeding elements. This means that the taller a relatively
              positioned element is, the more space it forces on the page.

              Position:static
              -------------------
              As with relative position, static positions also "go with �the flow". An
              element with a static position cannot have values for offset�s (top, right,
              left, bottom) or if it has them, they will be ignored. Unless explicitly
              positioned, all div elements default to static positioning.

              Position:fixed
              ------------------
              A page element with this style will not scroll as the page c�ontent scrolls.
              Support for this in elements other than page backgrounds is �quirky

              There are several other things you need to know:

              1. ANY page element can be positioned - paragraphs, tables, images, lists,
              etc.
              2. The <div> tag is a BLOCK level tag. This means that if it is not
              positioned or explicitly styled otherwise, a) it will always begin on a new
              line on the screen, and b) it will always force content to a new line below
              it, and c) it will always take up the entire width of its container (i.e.,
              width:100%).
              3. The placement of A/P elements *can* affect the BEHAVIOR of other
              elements
              on the page. For example, a 'layer' placed over a hyperlink will mask that
              hyperlink.

              You can see a good example of the essential difference between absolute and
              relative positioning here -

              http://www.great-web-sights.com/g_layersdemo.asp

              You can see a good demonstration of why using layers for a page layout tool
              is dangerous here -

              http://www.great-web-sights.com/g_layer-overlap.asp

              > But the div vs layer thing is still a bit fuzzy.

              The more you understand about 'the normal flow' of the page, and the use of
              CSS floats, the better you will understand these mysteries.

              --
              Murray --- ICQ 71997575
              Adobe Community Expert
              (If you *MUST* email me, don't LAUGH when you do so!)
              ==================
              http://www.dreamweavermx-templates.com - Template Triage!
              http://www.projectseven.com/go - DW FAQs, Tutorials & Resources
              http://www.dwfaq.com - DW FAQs, Tutorials & Resources
              http://www.macromedia.com/support/search/ - Macromedia (MM) Technotes
              ==================


              "sbell2200" <webforumsuser@macromedia.com> wrote in message
              news:e8cp5o$bcg$1@forums.macromedia.com...
              > thanks for those helpful suggestions. I tried it on two more PC's, it is
              > just
              > a problem
              > on that one PC, and she has the font size set to the maximum possible.
              > I'm
              > wondering,
              > do I need to set font sizes using em's, or some other trick, in order for
              > my
              > page to scale
              > more gracefully? I'd like to learn how to follow good design practices.
              >
              > Also, could you clear up a misunderstanding for me? In learning CSS, I
              > finally really "got"
              > what a "div" is, and then made the leap (I thought) in getting what a
              > layer
              > is. I had decided
              > that a layer is just a div pair with absolute positioning specified. Was
              > my
              > logic flawed?
              > I want to make sure I understand the different properties of each and how
              > they
              > relate.
              >
              > I layed out this page using layers. I notice in CSS tutorials that layers
              > don't come up as much,
              > just the div sections then somehow things (seem to) magically fall into
              > the
              > right place on the
              > page by "floating" them. As you can see, i'm still struggling a bit with
              > the
              > basic CSS concepts.
              > I do understand how CSS modifies tags, a bit about classes, how the
              > external
              > style sheet works.
              > But the div vs layer thing is still a bit fuzzy.
              >
              > thanks again,
              >
              > -steve
              >