6 Replies Latest reply on Nov 5, 2014 8:43 PM by Migintosh

    Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box

    AlyMcF1

      I have a family tree graphic I made in InDesign, that is saved as a grouped .indd file. I originally placed this family tree into a larger InDesign document that is full of text, and just placed it on top of the text and did a text wrap so the text would no obscure the graphic.

       

      Now I would like to change from a separate placed graphic to an inline text graphic, so the graphic will flow with the text.

       

      When I try either of the following workflows:

      --cut graphic, place cursor within text, then paste

      or

      --delete graphic, choose File > Place, choose graphic.indd file, click cursor into text,

       

      the graphic just appears above the cursor as a separate graphic…not inline.

       

      Any idea what could be happening here?

       

      InDesign CS5 on Mac by the way.

        • 1. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
          Migintosh Level 4

          Click into the text frame that has your text and go to the Story Editor (File>Edit in Story Editor or Command Y for the shortcut). Do you see the anchor icons that indicate an anchored object? Here's a screenshot with the anchors circled in red.

          ss.png

          The first one is in the middle of a paragraph, and the second is in it's own paragraph.

           

          If the object is inline, it will have an anchor icon. If this is what you have, but you don't like the placement, you can exit the story editor and click on the object on the page with the Select tool and go to Object>Anchored Object>Options. There you can choose between Inline (with the option to change the Y positioning if Inline), or Above Line (with the option to change the Alignment and Space Before and Space After). Your other choice is Custom, where you have many options. In either, you can choose to Prevent Manual Positioning with a checkbox.

          • 2. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
            AlyMcF1 Level 1

            OK after much mucking about, I was finally able to get a small .tif graphic to be behave like an inline graphic in the desired position, but in order to get my place InDesign file to work, I had to reopen it in InDesign, reduce the document size so it was close to the size of the actual graphic, then export it at as .eps and bring that in to my big document instead.

             

            Thanks for your help!

            • 3. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
              Migintosh Level 4

              You probably shouldn't do it that way, but I have a question about what you did.

              AlyMcF1 wrote:

               

              I was finally able to get a small .tif graphic…reopen it in InDesign…export it at as .eps and bring that in to my big document instead…

              You may have just forgotten to say that you converted the eps into a tiff, or you meant to say that you placed an eps instead of a tiff. Either way, you don't need to do all that. If the problem was:

              AlyMcF1 wrote:

               

              …reduce the document size so it was close to the size of the actual graphic…

              …that the graphic was too large to fit inline, what you should have done is to place it on the pasteboard at a reduced size, then copy or cut it to the clipboard, and then paste that inline with your text. If, when you place the graphic, you click and drag, it will automatically size the graphic to the size that you drag. You can also place it at full size, then reduce it on the pasteboard before you copy/paste it inline.

               

              The advantage of placing the original InDesign document (or a pdf, if you want to take that extra step), rather than a tiff, is that you get vector data on things like type or objects, instead of pixelated/raster data, which won't look as good, and could even make the file size larger (if that's a concern). And as far as eps goes, it's an older file format, and I don't know of any reason to use it over pdf or indd when it comes to placing in InDesign. As a matter of fact, if you have any transparency in the document you want to place as a graphic, eps will flatten it, while .indd or .pdf will keep the transparency live (if you don't flatten the transparency in the export-to-pdf stage), allowing it to be rasterized at the RIP, where it will output at the best quality.

              • 4. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
                AlyMcF1 Level 1

                I saved it as an .eps because

                -- .tif wasn't an option

                -- I had already tried an .indd file an wanted to comparison test

                -- didn't think importing a .pdf into a file I plan to export as a .pdf seemed like a good idea (maybe I'm wrong)

                I didn't do copy and paste because I grew up doing layout in the Pagemaker days and didn't want to risk messing up the link to the graphic (I was always taught that copying and pasting was a bad idea, and so is resizing a graphic within the page layout app).

                • 5. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  AlyMcF1 wrote:

                   

                  I saved it as an .eps because

                  ...

                  -- didn't think importing a .pdf into a file I plan to export as a .pdf seemed like a good idea (maybe I'm wrong)

                  A better idea than using .eps...

                  • 6. Re: Placing text inline…keeps coming in outside the text box
                    Migintosh Level 4

                    AlyMcF1 wrote:

                     

                    I saved it as an .eps because

                    -- .tif wasn't an option

                    If you have type, it's best to not rasterize it, but if you do want to do that for some reason, export as PDF, open it in Photoshop and save as a tiff. I don't think there is any real advantage to having something made in InDesign converted to a tiff just to place back into InDesign, but if that's what you want, this is better than eps.

                    AlyMcF1 wrote:

                     

                    -- didn't think importing a .pdf into a file I plan to export as a .pdf seemed like a good idea (maybe I'm wrong)

                    I don't know of any downside.

                    AlyMcF1 wrote:

                     

                    (I was always taught that copying and pasting was a bad idea…

                    Maybe in PageMaker, but InDesign is not PageMaker. Copying from Illustrator or Photoshop and pasting into InDesign is bad, because you should be saving from Illustrator or Photoshop and placing, but copying and pasting within InDesign is just fine.

                    AlyMcF1 wrote:

                     

                    …and so is resizing a graphic within the page layout app).

                    Enlarging a raster graphic will lower the effective resolution, but as long as the effective resolution is within your target range, it's OK (e.g., a 600ppi file will be OK if it's twice the size in InDesign if your target resolution is 300ppi). Vector graphics have no resolution, so there is no issue with resizing. I think the advise to not resize was based on not giving PageMaker more to do at the output stage (recalculating the size of placed graphics was thought to involve heavy lifting that you wanted to spare PageMaker from having to do). I don't think anyone still advises that, but if they do, they might see this post and give their reasons why.