5 Replies Latest reply on Nov 4, 2014 5:47 AM by Eugene Tyson

    idml file created in "package"

    upsidedownfly

      Why does packaging my publication create an idml file that is more than twice the file size of my indd file? Will my printer need this?

        • 1. Re: idml file created in "package"
          Laubender Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          About the file size of your IDML: Hm, maybe you copied a lot of image data to your InDesign document instead of linking it to the original images?
          For the second question: Why is your printer needing InDesign documents at all? Is it not sufficient to provide PDFs?

           

          Uwe

          • 2. Re: idml file created in "package"
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            And including the .idml file in the package is a user option. You can uncheck the box.

            • 3. Re: idml file created in "package"
              Eugene Tyson Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              IDML is a file format that is basically a XML document. You can change the extension to .zip and unpack all the files.

               

              The purpose of the IDML is kinda threefold

              1) It allows people with older versions of InDesign to open the file

              2) It's handy to have if the original InDesign goes missing (at least you have a backup)

              3) If the original InDesign file is behaving strange, it could be corrupted and the IDML file can clear minor corruption by removing extra code and rebuilds the file.

               

              If you embedded images in your document, then export to IDML then of course, as it's a packed file, the images are included in all those subfolders, how else would it display an embedded image for output?

               

              IDML is handy file format to have for yourself. But the printers do not require InDesign files, PDFs are usually sufficient for them - unless of course you have an agreement with your printers that they put finishing touches and prepare your file for print.

               

               

              Anyway - that's what it is - and as Peter said, you can uncheck that option if you desire.

              • 4. Re: idml file created in "package"
                Laubender Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Eugene wrote:

                If you embedded images in your document, then export to IDML then of course, as it's a packed file, the images are included in all those subfolders, how else would it display an embedded image for output?

                @Eugene – If you embed images and export to IDML you will get huge IDML files, because the embeded image is (must be) encoded as part of a XML file. It's not a separate file in a subfolder of the IDML. It is part of the XML description of the page item class of objects. You could also export an embeded image to IDMS (the "little" brother of IDML) and open that directly in a text editor to see how the binary data of the image is encoded.

                 

                Encoding of binary data as part of a IDML or IDMS is not efficient compared to the original InDesign document. So embeded binary data will bloat IDML files compared to InDesign documents.

                 

                I just tested that. Placed one image. Embeded this in the document. Exported to IDML.
                File size of InDesign document: 418 KB

                File size of IDML: 844 KB

                 

                Cracked the IDML open, checked the file size of its parts.
                File size of Spreads / Spread_ub7.xml : 528 KB

                 

                Uwe

                • 5. Re: idml file created in "package"
                  Eugene Tyson Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Thanks for clearing that up - I was trying to keep it simple - but you explained it perfectly!