4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 5, 2014 8:54 PM by Migintosh

    Why does my illustration arrive with a white background?

    TedWiden

      After I've prepared a photo or illustration and place it into InDesign, it arrives with a white background. What must I do to change this?

        • 1. Re: Why does my illustration arrive with a white background?
          HeyMikey Level 3

          What type of file are you placing? Any flattened image will have a white background (really the bounding box, or canvas size). If it's an Illustrator vector file (not an image placed in Illustrator and saved as AI), when placing the AI file, click the button to show import options, at the lower left of the place dialog. You'll get a second window which will have various options, one of which is transparent background. Hope this helps!

           

          Cheers!

          -Mikey

          • 2. Re: Why does my illustration arrive with a white background?
            TedWiden Level 1

            Hi Mikey, I'm using .tif files, which I've done many times before.  I've worked with these photos in Photoshop (geese flying, for instance) but the transparent background is showing up white. I read another person's question and investigated the "options" box, but it doesn't offer "transparent background".  Any other thoughts?

            Ted

            • 3. Re: Why does my illustration arrive with a white background?
              winterm Level 4

              TedWiden wrote:

               

              ... investigated the "options" box, but it doesn't offer "transparent background"

              Really? It offers...

              save as tiff (not flattened!) in PS - note Save Transparency box in bottom half of TIFF Options Dialog box. Now ID will 'recognize' your transparent background.

              transtiff.png

              • 4. Re: Why does my illustration arrive with a white background?
                Migintosh Level 4

                If the tiff was flattened, or if you can't see the checkerboard background when viewed in Photoshop, you should check to see if there is a clipping path. You can do that in InDesign by going to Object>Clipping Path>Options. It's possible that the file has one or more clipping paths, but none were saved as the default clipping path in Photoshop. Clipping paths aren't always the best way to work, but when you want to use them, this is something to consider.