4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 9, 2014 10:21 AM by Bill Gehrke

    Transforming this Laptop

    johnt53984649 Level 2

      I know that, earlier, I was trying to come up with one of the best builds.  Ignore that, I was only curious.  I don't have nearly that kind of money.  This is what I have and what I'm trying to accomplish; is it possible, and what does it take?

      I possess the following Laptop:

      Samsung Series 7 Chronos: http://www.samsung.com/us/computer/pcs/NP700Z5C-S02UB-specs

      Relevant specs:

       

      PROCESSOR

      CPU Intel® Core™ i7-3635QM Processor

      Speed (GHz) 2.40 GHz

      CPU Cache 6MB

       

      SYSTEM MEMORY

      System Memory 8GB

      Memory Type DDR3 (1600 MHz)

      Max. System Memory 8GB (On Board 4G + 4GB)

       

      STORAGE

      Storage Capacity 1TB with ExpressCache™ Technology, 8GB

      Storage Technology 5400RPM

      Storage Interface SATA2

      GRAPHICS

       

      Chipset NVIDIA® GeForce® GT 640M Graphics

      Integrated (Optimus™ technology)

      Maximum Graphics Memory : 1GB

       

      I/O PORTS

      VGA Mini VGA (Mini VGA to VGA dongle sold separately)

      HDMI Yes

      Headphone Out Yes

      Microphone In Yes

      USB Ports (Total) 1 x USB 2.0 + 2 x USB 3.0

      Multi Card Slot 3- in-1 (SD/SDHC/SDXC)

      RJ45 (LAN) Yes

       

      MY GOAL:

      My goal is to be able to utilize Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2014 and Adobe Speedgrade CC 2014 effectively.  I know that my hard drive does not meet the minimum requirements, as it is only 5400 RPM.  Similarly, I've only been able to try and use Premiere Pro with one Hard Drive, where at least 3 are recommended.  Whenever I try to render something, even just preview files, in Premiere Pro, not only does it take a ridiculous amount of time, but it doesn't play back smoothly, it drops frames.  I'm assuming this to be due to the combination of the fact that my hard drive is less than 7200 RPM and the fact that I'm only using 1 hard drive.  The only thing that makes Premiere Pro CC 2014 unusable for me is the fact that renders take so long and the fact that it can't do realtime playback.

       

      Basically:

      I think that the only reason I can't use Premiere Pro CC 2014 effectively is due simply to my hard drive restrictions.  I think that my RAM and Graphics card are good enough (I'm using AVCHD [1080x1920]).  I'm sure that the CPU also has a massive contributing factor in the ability to render quickly, but I think that what I have is good enough.

       

      SO HOW CAN I FIX IT?

      I'm really looking at the Samsung 850 Pros.  I know that they're expensive, but they'd be effective and a lot cheaper than building a whole new system when I think it's possible to be able to use them with what I already have.  However, I don't know if it really is possible to use them and if they'd be effective.  Here're my questions:

      • Would, given the other hardware mentioned, using 3 Samsung 850 Pros (don't worry about the Gigabytes on each, that's something else I'll figure out later) actually fix the problem?
      • Is it possible to install a Samsung 850 Pro directly into the laptop, taking the HDD already in there out, and then using two other external ones by some SATA to USB 3.0 converter?
      • Would, by using a lower USB 3.0 connection, the speeds be significantly hindered from it's original SATA connection?
      • If there's another way, can I hook up more than 1 of these Samsung 850 Pros by SATA to this laptop?
      • If none of this is possible, what do you recommend?  I can't really afford too many of the other parts, but I want to be able to utilize what I have.  On this system, what should I use/do to be able to use Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2014 without it lagging/dropping frames/reading and writing from the same disk?
        • 1. Re: Transforming this Laptop
          JEShort01 Level 4

          My mother used to say you cannot turn a pig's ear into a silk purse. And while anything is "possible", adding even 1 high-end SSD to your base system would be a waste of time and money in my opinion.

           

          I would suggest following JFPhoton's and/or Bill Gehrke's instructions of how to buy and build a cost effective, powerful Asus laptop (by adding a couple of tweaks to a base model). And use Crucial SSDs, not 850's (very similar performance for Premiere Pro and much less expensive), especially when you have a tight budget.

           

          You state Premiere works fine except for timeline work and renders. Sorry, but isn't that the point of using Premiere! Your current laptop is balanced, but reasonably poor in all areas (cpu, gpu, RAM, and drive speed). When $1200 of smart money can get you a decent laptop, go that route and then sell what you have for whatever you can get for it ($150?).

           

          Finally, you could possibly use consumer video editing software (Elements, etc.) if you are really bent on sticking with your current laptop.

           

          Good luck!

           

          Jim

          • 2. Re: Transforming this Laptop
            johnt53984649 Level 2

            I understand that the other areas are pretty poor, but realtime playback is something that I highly value.  From what I understand, it is just the HDD that I currently have that's causing it to not be played back quickly enough (since it's only 5400 RPM).  Am I wrong about this?

            • 3. Re: Transforming this Laptop
              JEShort01 Level 4

              I doubt that your HDD is the only thing holding your current laptop back for timeline playback, and I would suspect CPU as being the most binding.

               

              You can use task manager and resource manager (assuming you use Win7; you do not state O/S) to view cpu usage, RAM usage, and disk activity during timeline playback and tell a whole lot more about your exact situation. for GPU activity, you can download one of the free utilities that monitor that too.

               

              You could run PPBM7 to get a true scorecard for disk I/O, CPU, and GPU capabilities for your current system if you want to learn more and don't mind "wasting more of your life away".

               

              If you want to get real Premiere Pro performance though, again, start looking for a whole system replacement!

               

              Jim

              • 4. Re: Transforming this Laptop
                Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                I wanted to suggest a simple $50 experiment for you.

                 

                I took a look at your CPU, while we both have laptop CPU's that run at the same speed and both are hyperthreaded to run 8 threads. The big problem is that your CPU does not have the more advance instruction sets that Premiere uses in my i7-4700HQ has (from Speccy:  MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4.2, Intel 64, NX, VMX, AES, AVX, AVX2, FMA3).  Also your limit of 8 GB of RAM is against you.  Another factor is your laptop is a very early implementation of USB3 so its performance might be suspect.

                 

                So I rather doubt it would help much.

                 

                I am editing multilayer AVCHD videos with this laptop very successfully, I never render the timelines and when it comes to exporting I do that on a very powerful desktop.  I have all the project files and media on a very fast USB3 flash drive.  While this laptop has an internal second drive, I do not find it to be necessary.  With the C: drive also being a fast SSD and the USB3 key being very fast with read performance it is very usable.

                 

                The experiment would have been to go buy a PNY Turbo 128 GB USB3 flash drive load the media and project file and see what your performance is.  If that is a noticeable performance improvement get an SSD to replace the 5400 rpm drive.  You might be able use a less expensive Samsung EVO drive since the C: drive is mostly read-only operations.

                 

                Here is the read transfer rate of the PNY

                PNY-128-GB-Read.png