10 Replies Latest reply on Nov 21, 2014 6:29 AM by 4500 Times

    1080P output from A.E.

    4500 Times Level 1

      Hi.

       

      I have been rendering off frames from 3DS Max at 1280 x 720 as EXR and compositing in AE to output MP4 files.  We are now looking to display a set of videos on larger screens (~46") and I have been asked to output as 1080P.

       

      Q.1     Do I need to render off at a different size from 3DS Max ?

      Q.2     How do output from A.E.?

       

      Would someone please be able to give me some pointers to get started.

       

      Many thanks,

       

      T

        • 1. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
          Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          4500 Times wrote:

          Q.1     Do I need to render off at a different size from 3DS Max ?

           

          Technically no, but ideally yes.

          I mean, you could output a 480x320 file from 3DS Max and use it in a 4K AE comp if you wanted to, but it wouldn't look good.

          You should render from your 3d software at the same size as your intended output or larger.

           

          4500 Times wrote:

           

          Q.2     How do output from A.E.?

           

          I don't understand this question. The workflow in AE is the same with 1080 as it is with 720. The only difference is that your composition is a larger size. You output the same way you did before.

          Although, if you're rendering from AE as MP4, I would recommend against that. It's better to render an intermediate file from AE into something like QuickTime with the Photo-JPEG codec or QuickTime with the PNG codec and then use that file in the Adobe Media Encoder to make the MP4.

           

          If you're new to AE, I would highly recommend that you start here: Getting started with After Effects

          • 2. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
            4500 Times Level 1

            Thanks for the reply.

             

            1.  I think this has clarified what I wanted to know.  So, rendering for 1080p output is simply a case of rendering off from 3DS Max at 1920 x 1080 (ideally) and it is purely the output size (from A.E.) that "defines" it as 1080p?  I then simply output from AE to the same size (1920 x 1080)?

             

            2.  Also, what is the thinking behind rendering to Quick Time first, then to another format?

             

            I just did a quick test of a short clip (~400 frames) using an existing set of renders that are 2560 x 1600.  I rendered to Quick Time and the file size was 1.2Gb.  My full animation will therefore be huge in Quick Time.

             

            3.  Is this still going to be viable even just as an intermediate step?

             

            Many thanks,

             

            • 3. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
              Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              4500 Times wrote:

               

              So, rendering for 1080p output is simply a case of rendering off from 3DS Max at 1920 x 1080 (ideally) and it is purely the output size (from A.E.) that "defines" it as 1080p?  I then simply output from AE to the same size (1920 x 1080)?

               

              Yes.

              And yes.

               

              4500 Times wrote:

               

              Also, what is the thinking behind rendering to Quick Time first, then to another format?

               

              AE isn't very good at h.264 encoding. In fact, it's not even part of AE in the latest version - Adobe removed it (using Adobe Media Encoder to create H.264, MPEG-2, and WMV videos from After Effects). One big difference is that AE doesn't (can't) do multipass encoding. Multipass encoding helps you get better-quality video at lower bitrates. So it's best to render into something else in AE.

              There are a couple of reasons for the intermediate step as opposed to dropping your AE comp directly into the Adobe Media Encoder. For one thing, if you're using the ray-traced renderer, GPU acceleration in AE will be a lot faster. For another thing, you may want to do a bit of testing of various data rates and compression settings. Digital video delivery is all about balancing quality and file size. If your AE composition takes a while to render, you don't want to be having to wait hours just to see if 3.5 Mbps is acceptable vs. 4 Mbps. If you've already rendered your comp, the Media Encoder is just having to run through a QuickTime file and encode it.

               

              4500 Times wrote:

               

              Is this still going to be viable even just as an intermediate step?

              As I said, you don't have to do the intermediate step. You can actually drop your AE composition directly into the Adobe Media Encoder and render out your h.264 there. However, as I mentioned above, there may be reasons to prefer the intermediate step. For some people who have nailed down the settings that work for them and who don't use the ray-traced renderer, it's better just to toss the AE comp to the Media Encoder and let it get to work while they carry on with the next project in AE! (Another advantage of using the Adobe Media Encoder is that it can be rendering one AE comp while you work on another.)

              • 4. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                4500 Times Level 1

                Thanks very much for your help.  That was very useful.

                 

                Cheers,

                 

                T

                • 5. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                  Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Glad to help

                  • 6. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                    4500 Times Level 1

                    Just one more thing.

                     

                    I do not have the "Composition>Add to Adobe Media Encoder Queue" option.  I am on 11.0.0.378, is this the reason?

                     

                    I know I can get the AE comp into Media Encoder other ways but there seems not to be the "one-click" option (as there is in Premiere Pro).

                     

                    Cheers,

                     

                    • 7. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                      Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      4500 Times wrote:

                      I do not have the "Composition>Add to Adobe Media Encoder Queue" option.  I am on 11.0.0.378, is this the reason?

                        

                      Yes.
                      It's not a big deal though. However, you should update your copy of AE. You're missing a lot of bug fixes. CS6 should be on 11.0.4

                      • 8. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                        4500 Times Level 1

                        Thanks.  I will get our IT to download the latest version.

                         

                        Another question.  The videos I have been referring to have previously been rendered off at 1280 x 720.  As discussed, I will now be rendering off at 1920 x 1080.  My next job is creating an AVI that will be played on a large screen (~4.5m x 3m) with ratio 1.5:1.  The screen will be made up of tiles (probably 0.5m x 0.5m) and be ~10mm pixel pitch.  What would be the best output format from A.E. for this application?  Do I still maintain the 1080 smaller dimension and then pro-rata to get the other e.g. 1620?

                         

                        Thanks,

                         

                        T

                        • 9. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                          Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          4500 Times wrote:

                           

                          My next job is creating an AVI that will be played on a large screen (~4.5m x 3m) with ratio 1.5:1.  The screen will be made up of tiles (probably 0.5m x 0.5m) and be ~10mm pixel pitch.  What would be the best output format from A.E. for this application?  Do I still maintain the 1080 smaller dimension and then pro-rata to get the other e.g. 1620?

                           

                          Whatever system you're using to play back video should have specific requirements of pixel dimensions. Use those - whatever they are. The best quality is found by designing to the resolution of your delivery format. Many large screens have odd pixel dimensions - some higher than HD, many lower.

                          • 10. Re: 1080P output from A.E.
                            4500 Times Level 1

                            Thanks again.

                             

                            I will look into this.

                             

                            Cheers,

                             

                            T