8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 28, 2014 5:39 AM by cc_merchant

    NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration

    johnt53984649 Level 2

      So, I'm looking at the following graphics card.  From what I understand, it is still manufactured by NVIDIA, despite having the name of EVGA.  However, I'm unsure as to whether or not this graphics card can be used with Premiere Pro's CUDA acceleration.  Can it utilize this graphics card?

      EVGA GeForce GTX 970 Superclocked ACX 2.0 Video Card 04G-P4-2974-KR - Micro Center

        • 2. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
          atPlay Level 1

          I am looking to upgrade to this or a similar model from another maker soon.  The base components come from Nvidia but each label EVGA, Gigabyte, Asus or what have you build on top of that to make their own version which is why you see different brands and models of the same card.

           

          Adobe has a blog post about being able to use unsupported or uncertified cards within Premiere Pro.  There used to be a hack with a text file but the most recent version does not have that option anymore, instead within premiere you do it from within the preferences directly.  It will work then with your GPU but NOT take full advantage of it and won't until it is at some point certified though that does not mean it doesn't work at all it just doesn't take full advantage of the card as it would if the card were Adobe certified.

           

          what cc_merchant said, Yes it will work but not as well as certified cards.

          • 3. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
            cc_merchant Level 4

            It will work then with your GPU but NOT take full advantage of it and won't until it is at some point certified though that does not mean it doesn't work at all it just doesn't take full advantage of the card as it would if the card were Adobe certified.

            That is crap. A card works with CUDA acceleration, or it doesn't. There is no difference between 'certified' or 'non-certified' cards. The functionality is absolutely the same.

             

            Yes it will work but not as well as certified cards.

            Nonsense. And there are no 'certified' cards. Only supported and non-supported cards. In fact, many non-supported cards do way better than supported cards.

             

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            • 4. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
              atPlay Level 1

              I appreciate your input but Adobe does not say that from anywhere I can find.  They say the card is certified by them to work or it isn't.

              From a technical stand point you are probably correct but from what I am reading on the forums it does not seem to be totally accurate in real world practice.

               

              Some cards do perform better than others and depending on your hardware will perform 100% or maybe not and be say 80% or 40% performance.

              The same card in my system may perform at 60% where in your system it maybe 100%, it is hard to say definitely with 100% accuracy for every card

              it works or it doesn't work, many people that report their experiences aren't as black as white as that.

              • 5. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
                atPlay Level 1

                There was a typo in that post above that was quoted by cc_merchant..  I said as I was typing

                I said Yes it will work but maybe not as well as certified cards.. I left the maybe out when I typed it and did not notice..

                 

                Not sure if my second post above was said correctly either. 

                 

                Adobe certifies video cards after checking them out and verifying they work to the standards they have for their software.

                If a video card is not certified then it just means Adobe hasn't tested that model yet OR they did and it was found to not function either at all or to the satisfaction of Adobe.

                 

                There are video cards that are not certified that work 100%, there are some that don't perform at 100% but do work just not as well.  The reason I say that

                is because of the reports and feedback I have been reading on the forums from people with uncertified cards that check their cards stats and give their feedback

                shows that some cards work but don't work as well as those that are fully Adobe certified.  There does not seem to be just a black and white it works or it doesn't work scenerio though some cards do not work at all and some of that could be just the card or will work after a bios of the mobo update and/or bios or firmware update of the video card.  Mileage varies.

                 

                If it makes more sense to you feel free to replace "certified" with "supported" above.

                • 6. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
                  cc_merchant Level 4

                  You are referring to bottlenecks in other components, that hold back performance of the video card, as in your own system.

                   

                  That is completely different than what you stated:

                  It will work then with your GPU but NOT take full advantage of it and won't until it is at some point certified though that does not mean it doesn't work at all it just doesn't take full advantage of the card as it would if the card were Adobe certified.

                  Certification has nothing to do with the functionality of CUDA acceleration. Functionality is the same for 'certified' and 'non-certified' cards. Getting Adobe's blessing does not change the performance or functionality of the video card. It simply means that you can contact Adobe support in case of questions or trouble, only if the video card is supported. If the card is not supported, you will get no assistance from Adobe, you are on your own. Some call that a blessing ... with Adobe's support track record.

                   

                  Sure, you are correct that video card X can work great in system A but only mediocre in system B, but that is in no way related to different functionality in PR of whether a card is supported or not.

                  But here we are getting into the aspect of 'balanced' or 'unbalanced systems'. See Tweakers Page - Balanced Systems

                  • 7. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
                    atPlay Level 1

                    That wasn't suppose to be a black and white statement of it WON'T work if it isn't supported by Adobe..  I actually said it to myself as I typed it that it "Maybe" wouldn't work but as it seems not everything gets out to my fingers.

                     

                    Not just bottlenecks but the software not taking full advantage of a cards architecture such as the new haswells which are designed more to be "like" a cpu and take some of the computing power for general use compared to JUST video related function.

                     

                    Help clear my confusion up so we can put this to rest.

                     

                    Adobe does their certification / support thing and puts the cards entry into their supported cards somewhere in their software.

                    Then it just automagically starts using Cuda or whatever without you needing to do anything, yes?   maybe need to tick a checkbox somewhere maybe not but

                    either way you don't get popup warnings.

                     

                    Now with the new Haswell cards do they, Adobe, not just have to add this entry but also update their software so that the software can work or work more efficiently with these cards?  If so, then wouldn't that be a situation where you have a card, it is not supported, you add it to the list depending on the version and software either in a text file or in the settings directly.  The card works but because Adobe hasn't yet gotten around to making the software work more efficiently with that architecture the GPU is under utilized compared to what it could be if the software were updated for that architecture.  Wouldn't that be a it works but not as well as a fully supported card?

                     

                    Other software manufactures in the NLE industry have to actually update their software to work with the new technology, some just came out and said they will not be doing that so anyone with the Nvidia 900 series is just out of luck with that software.. such as Vegas to name a name.

                     

                    What you are saying is NOPE, not at all... either it works or it doesn't and if it works it works and takes full advantage of the card and nothing more to do here?
                    Interesting on that is I have read several others in the forums here talk about what I am saying where cards work but they work not as well as others.

                    Why that is seems to vary...

                     

                    So is it Black and White or is there grey area here?   I am confused on how Adobe software actually functions in this respect.

                    • 8. Re: NVIDIA/EVGA for CUDA Acceleration
                      cc_merchant Level 4

                      Your assumption is wrong. There are several reasons for that.

                       

                      1. Adobe does not have the time nor manpower to test each and every video card appearing on the market.
                      2. Adobe likes it when users take things into their own hands to test for Adobe. It saves them time and effort. Hence the 'cuda_supported_cards.txt' file.
                      3. Adobe hates small updates and putting them on the web. Just too costly in time and effort.
                      4. Adobe would be flooded with support questions from people not connected to the internet and not able to install these small updates. Not desirable.
                      5. Adobe likes the quick and easy way out, so no recoding, recompiling, retesting, redistribution and the like. The alternative is too costly.
                      6. CS6, as a part of the CC suite or as the last perpetual license, would be discriminated since CS6 is feature frozen, which does not (yet) happen.
                      7. Adobe version numbers are too far apart and updates too infrequent to warrant your assumption.
                      8. Benchmark tests on over 1300 PR systems have never shown any indication in terms of results to justify your assumption.
                      9. Quadro K4200, K5200, K6200 are not supported in CS6. Do they work better than Quadro K4000, K5000 or K6000? Sure.
                      10. Do they need an internet connection to work? No. Do they need updates? No.
                      11. I could probably come up with a dozen more valid arguments, but this should suffice for the time being.

                       

                      What you are saying is NOPE, not at all... either it works or it doesn't and if it works it works and takes full advantage of the card and nothing more to do here?
                      Interesting on that is I have read several others in the forums here talk about what I am saying where cards work but they work not as well as others.

                      Why that is seems to vary...

                      That is actually quite simple. 90-95% of the posters here have no idea what a video card does in what circumstances (you are among them), what the impact is of other system components that are bottlenecks to hold back video card performance in certain situations, etc.

                       

                      You stated yourself - in another thread - :

                      Though remember this is a 550 Ti video card I currently have and almost any upgrade would see big improvement.

                      which demonstrates you do not understand the impact of the various system components on the performance of the video card.