6 Replies Latest reply on Dec 11, 2014 9:55 AM by Modesto Vega

    Soft proofing

    Modesto Vega Level 1

      A spin off from the last post on this thread Are there any reasons why I should not upgrade to Yosemite?

       

      What do the different soft proofing warning colours mean? So far I seen black (which I assume to be black clipping), red and purple.

        • 1. Re: Soft proofing
          wobertc Adobe Community Professional

          Taken from the Lightroom Help PDF page 141  (which can be downloaded to your computer.!):

           

          "Colors that are outside your display’s color capabilities appear blue in the image preview area.

          Colors that are outside your printer’s rendering capabilities appear red in the image preview area.

          Colors that are outside the gamut of both the monitor and destination device appear pink in the image preview area."

          • 2. Re: Soft proofing
            Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            The colors are red for out of gamut on the profile and blue for out of monitor profile. When the color is out of both the monitor and the destination gamut you'll get purple. There is no black clipping warning.

            • 3. Re: Soft proofing
              Modesto Vega Level 1

              Thanks, for the record page 167 in the latest documentation (and not in the index).

              • 4. Re: Soft proofing
                Modesto Vega Level 1

                There are still 2 things I cannot get my head around. I have a calibrated profile for a display, I have confirmed that it is in used by OS X, through ColorSync, if I soft proof with that profile I get gamut warnings for both the monitor and paper. The only profile that does not give any gamut warnings is the one for my favourite paper, which is good news.


                What I do not understand is:


                1) Why do I get monitor gamut warnings with the calibrated display profile? My guess is that the RAW file contains some colours outside the gamut of the display, I don't have too much of problem with this explanation. The bit that confuses me is: what is the point of calibrating a display if I still get monitor gamut warnings? This suggests that even with a calibrated display something gets lost in translation.


                2) Why are the monitor and paper gamut warnings different for certain profiles including the calibrated display profile. My guess is that Lightroom performs 2 different calculations but how does it do it? What does it take into consideration?


                Finally, soft proofing seems to require some hefty computer power. It does not seem to be something I want to be doing with my MacBook Pro very often; it seriously struggles with it depute 4 GB of memory.


                 

                • 5. Re: Soft proofing
                  Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  1) Why do I get monitor gamut warnings with the calibrated display profile? My guess is that the RAW file contains some colours outside the gamut of the display, I don't have too much of problem with this explanation. The bit that confuses me is: what is the point of calibrating a display if I still get monitor gamut warnings? This suggests that even with a calibrated display something gets lost in translation.

                  Calibrating a display cannot change its physical characteristics. The emission spectrum of the backlight LED or fluorescent lamp combined with the characteristics of the liquid crystal filters determines the gamut the display can display. Calibration is basically a measurement of this gamut so that your computer knows approximately what real physical color the display displays when it sends it a certain rgb triplet. By this mechanism, if you have an image that is a known color space, you can translate between the known color in the source image and the color on the display so that you get the same color there. This only works of course if the display is capable of displaying that color. When you get a monitor gamut warning it means the display is simply not capable of displaying the desired color. So even with a calibrated display, you can't always represent the real colors in the file. This is also why wide gamut displays are useful when you are targeting print output. They can display a wider gamut. On such displays calibration and the use of color managed applications is even more essential.

                   

                  2) Why are the monitor and paper gamut warnings different for certain profiles including the calibrated display profile. My guess is that Lightroom performs 2 different calculations but how does it do it? What does it take into consideration?

                  I believe this has to do with numeric inaccuracy and with the sequence of translations. If I understand correctly, the monitor warning is separate from the profile warning which surprised me when I heard this. It would be logical to do a conversion to the target profile first and then check whether the color is now still outside of the monitor gamut. When you convert to the target profile, you can shift colors because of the chosen rendering intent, or because of simple clipping and that might bring the color inside the monitor gamut. This is apparently not how it works.


                  Finally, soft proofing seems to require some hefty computer power. It does not seem to be something I want to be doing with my MacBook Pro very often; it seriously struggles with it depute 4 GB of memory.

                  Yeah that is not enough unfortunately. If you have an older MBP that you can still upgrade the memory in, I would recommend you do. I would at least go with 8GB if you run LR 5 and yosemite. Memory is very cheap from places like other world computing or newegg or some such.

                  • 6. Re: Soft proofing
                    Modesto Vega Level 1

                    Thank you this is very informative and much appreciated. I do understand soft  proofing much better now.

                    Yeah that is not enough unfortunately. If you have an older MBP that you can still upgrade the memory in, I would recommend you do. I would at least go with 8GB if you run LR 5 and yosemite. Memory is very cheap from places like other world computing or newegg or some such.

                    MBP is a 2011 model.