8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 11, 2014 1:00 PM by Willi Adelberger

    Unwanted lines on PDF

    Stella1251 Level 1

      Hi. I am using a PC and CS6.

      I exported a booklet .pdf from InDesign and I noticed that there are faint lines that shouldn't be there around images. I viewed this on my own PC as well as a Mac with the same results.

      I highlighted the lines below within the red outlined rectangle. The top image shows lines and the bottom image shows the middle of the page where there shouldn't be a line either going down the middle. When the .pdf is zoomed out, this line is not there.

       

      To give a little more information, the images are .psd files. I used the setting Press Quality to create the .pdf in booklet style. If you need to view the .pdf. I included one page here on Dropbox:

      Dropbox - booklet 2.pdf

       

       

       

      Untitled-2.jpg

       

      Thank you.

        • 1. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

          The problem is caused by creating a PDF via PostScript and Printing. Don't do that. No Postscript, no distiller, no EPS.

          Don't use the print booklet function neither, because it is using postscript and not a good function in InDesign. Imposing is the task of the printer, not yours.

           

          The lines are created through the process of transparency flattening, they are only visible if you activate antialiasing for vectors in Acrobat or Reader. Turn it off. This is only a screen issue. Export a PDF/X-4, it would not cause these lines (and of course, never use EPS or flattened PDFs neither).

          • 2. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

            While Willi is basically correct, the lines commonly do show up on desktop print output, and even some commercial copiers. I presume you made the booklet PDF because you are doing the printing yourself, but there are alternatives to using Print Booklet in ID. First is Acrobat's own booklet printing, which works with an ordinary PDF exported from ID. If you EXPORT PDF with Acrobat 5 or higher compatibility, the transparency will not be flattened and you won't get the lines.

             

            Next choice might be a script that does the imposition for you, then you export a PDF of the imposed file. There are several out there that do simple 2-up saddle-stitch booklets.

             

            Finally, there are plugins, both for Acrobat and for InDesign, that can do all sorts of impositions with bleed and creep. The least expensive of these is probably IDImposer for ID. Overview | IDImposer

            • 3. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
              Jeffrey_Smith Most Valuable Participant

              OP stated the following:

              "I exported a booklet .pdf from InDesign" and "I used the setting Press Quality"


              If true, then Flattened Transparency is not a factor...

              • 4. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
                Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                Seems like we need some clarification on how the PDF was made.

                • 5. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
                  Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                  Jeffrey_Smith schrieb:

                   

                  OP stated the following:

                  "I exported a booklet .pdf from InDesign" and "I used the setting Press Quality"


                  If true, then Flattened Transparency is not a factor...

                  That is not true at all:

                  Your PDF (I downloaded it from the link, you have provided) is created via printing, postscript and Distiller. You can clearly read it out in the document's properties.

                  Any printed PDF has flattened transparency as also PDF1.3 and older are flattened when exported. So flattened transparency is here the factor.

                  • Why are you doing the imposing. I doubt that the printer requires preimposed PDFs with a high quality 8 page publication.
                  • Why are you using Press Quality, if you intent to print it on a commercial printer, export to one of the PDF/X standards, most recommended to PDF/X-4 which causes neither conversion nor flattening.
                  • Let the printer do the imposing, that's his task, not your's!
                  • 6. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
                    Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                    Sorry Jefrey, I thought you was the TE who asked the question, so the answer is to the origin.

                    • 7. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
                      Stella1251 Level 1

                      Thank You all for your answers and support. I guess I chose the Press Quality because I was always taught to do that unless otherwise specified.

                      I was trying to save the printer some time by doing the impositioning. I am sorry I was wrong and I am glad I turned to you all for help. I come from a long line of creating one page and double-sided brochures and never really created a piece like this (for print).

                       

                      So when you supply the PDF to the printer, do you have to export with spreads or without? Right now they are facing pages. the first and last page are alone and the others as spreads.. (In InDesign)

                       

                      I am grateful for all of your replies. Happy Holidays and hope you are all staying warm/in a warm place!

                      • 8. Re: Unwanted lines on PDF
                        Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                        When you supply PDFs to a printer in most cases should it be page wise export, not a spread export nor an imposed export of PDFs. Single pages, even if you have facing pages—that’s correct—export single pages.

                        Ask the printer following important settings:

                        1. Bleed? Only outside or all sides, how much
                        2. Registration marks, info? Most likely the printer will not need it.
                        3. Output Color Space (That is color mode like RGB or CMYK + Color Profile.)
                        4. PDF standard, if the printer allows transparency it will be most likely X-4, if the printer does not allow transparency and requires CMYK only, then X-1a would be better.

                         

                        It is very important to  communicate with the printer before you start a project and before you export the PDF. Many printers provide PDF joboptions you can load when you set up your PDF export in InDesign.