5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 17, 2014 9:22 AM by dj_paige

    Export

    hallon8

      When Exporting in Lightroom 5 I have been said not use FIT IN. The result is that some images will be very small some big. They have been changed in Lightroom the same way so why?

        • 1. Re: Export
          dj_paige Level 9

          "Fit In"? Haven't heard of that before, can you be more specific?

           

          The result is that some images will be very small some big.

          Please give examples, with details.

          • 2. Re: Export
            hallon8 Level 1

            When Exporting an image under Size you can choose either Fit or not Fit (no value is included).

            If you go for not Fit (as Scott Kelby recommend) and sent it to a lab some image will have the size of 20x30cm and some 5x7cm. If you want an A4 the quality of the last one will be quite bad. Both images comming from the same camera and both been develop in Lightroom 5.

            If I choose Fit and put the size of the longest side to 30 cm-both images are OK.

            Grateful for an explaination.

            Lars

            • 3. Re: Export
              elie-d Level 4

              Digital images don't have sizes in cm. or inches. All they have is pixels. Cm. is a measure for pieces of paper and when we print the pixels are distributed over the paper and the density of that distribution is the number of pixels on a side divided by the cm. of the print on that side (pixels per cm.) or the inches (ppi). The best quality prints will be obtained if you have 300 ppi or 120 ppc. So for an A4 (21x29.7 cm.) you want to have 2520x3564 pixels. More than that is a waste and less than that, down to 80 ppc, will produce a good print, but not the best. Crop your image to the A series aspect ratio, 1:1.414, and when you export use the Resize function and set the pixel dimensions to short side 2520. And don't forget to set the Output Sharpening also.

              • 4. Re: Export
                hallon8 Level 1

                Thank you for your answere but all this is not for at photographer it is for a technician. It is very complicated.

                First -since you can choose between pixels and cm when you specify the size it must be easier to write cm compare to pixels (how do you come up to 2520x3564)?

                Second- it means that Scott Kelby is wrong when he say that you normally only should specify dpi, skip the rest. He also say that the only reason for put a value for pixels is when you want a smaller picture compare to the orginal. Right?

                Third-some people say it is better to have a value of the long side and that is enough. You choose short side-why? They also say that I should use Standard for Sharpening. If you have sharpened the image in Lightroom 5 isn´t that enough? 

                 

                The overview problem is that many people have different solution to this area.

                So if I want the best quality of my image sending to a good lab and I want the size 20x30 cm and 40x50 cm, what do you recommend.

                Lars

                • 5. Re: Export
                  dj_paige Level 9

                  First -since you can choose between pixels and cm when you specify the size it must be easier to write cm compare to pixels (how do you come up to 2520x3564)?

                  In the end, pixels and centimeters (or inches) lead to the same result if you do things properly, but many many people make mistakes along the way. If you want 120 pixels per centimeter (that's how many you need to get a quality print), then you multiply 120 by the size of your paper in centimeters.

                  Second- it means that Scott Kelby is wrong when he say that you normally only should specify dpi, skip the rest. He also say that the only reason for put a value for pixels is when you want a smaller picture compare to the orginal. Right?

                  You can't specify dpi (dots per inch), you can specify pixels per inch (or pixels per centimeter), so if Kelby said you should specify dpi, then he is wrong for that reason, there is no dpi in Lightroom. And if he said ppi and leave the "resize to fit" box unchecked, that's also wrong because if you leave "resize to fit" unchecked, then ppi (or pixels per centimeter) has no effect on the export. None whatsoever.

                   

                  But the idea that you would leave "resize to fit" unchecked is good advice in many situations, and in other situations you would check this box and fill in the information needed. Since you haven't really said what the situation is that applies to you, we don't know if it's right for you or not.

                   

                  Third-some people say it is better to have a value of the long side and that is enough. You choose short side-why?

                  These are two different methods of getting to the same end result. One is not any better than the other.

                   

                  They also say that I should use Standard for Sharpening. If you have sharpened the image in Lightroom 5 isn´t that enough?

                  Search the Internet for discussion about Output Sharpening

                   

                  The overview problem is that many people have different solution to this area.

                  So if I want the best quality of my image sending to a good lab and I want the size 20x30 cm and 40x50 cm, what do you recommend.

                  There are many solutions because there are many different situations and many different needs.

                   

                  Quality is not determined by the number of centimeters. Quality is determined by the number of pixels, and by how much printed area they must cover.