4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 29, 2014 11:35 AM by Peferling

    I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)

    BoilersRock

      I have been tasked with updating an old Corporate video with new music, sounds, graphics and narration.

       

      The ONLY video-camera material I have is from a corporate DVD (NTSC) - the original source material is simply not available.

       

      I can rip the DVD to MPEG 2  and  import it into Premiere without issue, but would like to be able to use higher-resolutions for the updated graphics.

       

      I plan to export to Youtube (HD) but may well export to DVD or BluRay as well.

       

      My question really narrows down to how to manage Sequences.   I figure that my Sequence settings should be the highest resolution I expect to work with (Youtube HD or Bluray) allowing me to easily export to lower quality, but I don't really know if it's as  simple as that.  Is there an industry standard methodology?  Am I close?

        • 1. Re: I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)
          Peferling Level 4

          My first inclination/answer is to re-shoot.  However, if that option is out the window, then depending on how clean/sharp/compressed the source, don't expect miracles with 1080, and maybe with some creative scaling and sharpening in AE, get away with a 720.  You're pretty much stuck with the aspect ratio.  If it's 4:3, keep it 4:3 and be make creative use of the cropping space for text and graphics if it has to be 16:9 final.

           

          If I'm correct, you don't need to "RIP", you can just copy the VOBs to your hard drive and import them directly into CS5.5.  Another trick, depending on the how the file was coded, is to rename the file extension from .VOB to .mpg and import that.

           

          Anything you do in the pipe from scaling to recode will reduce quality.  Try to keep it the same throughout.

          • 2. Re: I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)
            SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

            Premiere can actually use .vob files from DVDs, just copy them from DVD to hard drive, then Import into Premiere.

             

            Is the existing DVD video in a 4:3 or 16:9 format? If 4:3, consider how you will work that into a 16:9 program. Rather than having black pillar bars at the sides, many editors will put in some sort of background to fill that space. A popular solution is to duplicate the 4:3 video on a lower track, stretch to fill the screen and add Gaussian Blur effect. Since the colors/content of the side bars will match the main video, it is somewhat disguises the fact that the video is 4:3.

             

            If you put SD footage into an HD program, it is going to look "soft" compared to HD footage. As a compromise, you might consider editing the new program as 720p rather than 1080p, so that the SD resolution is not being stretched as far. All computer video/YouTube video is non-interlaced, meaning editing sequences and exports should be done as Progressive.

             

            Potential workflow issue - if you take the existing SD footage from the DVD, and upscale it into an HD sequence, then export back to DVD (SD resolution), the video is turned to mush. It has been upscaled, then dowscaled again, really kills the quality. Might need to copy the finished HD sequence to an SD sequence, fix any size/scaling issues for graphics and titles, and export DVD from the SD sequence to avoid the upscale/downscale of SD footage. Note that DVD video is highly compressed, so you are already working with a weak source material, recompressing again is going to be a quality hit in any case, but definitely avoid upscale/downscale again.

             

            I don't have Adobe apps in front of me at the moment, but I believe the 720p Blu-ray export options are limited, perhaps 720p at 59.94 only, not certain. That may effect your decision of 1080p versus 720p.

             

            Hope these tips help

             

            Thanks

             

            Jeff Pulera

            Safe Harbor Computers

            • 3. Re: I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)
              BoilersRock Level 1

              Thanks, I'll try using VOB instead of MPEG2.   And I like the idea of filling in the pillars to preserve quality of the original SD as much as possible

              • 4. Re: I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)
                BoilersRock Level 1

                The DVD material is 4:3, NTSC -  I feel as if I've been given some leftover meatloaf and asked to reheat and spice it up to make a Filet Mignon.  

                 

                > If you put SD footage into an HD program, it is going to look "soft" compared to HD footage. As a compromise, you might consider editing the new program as 720p rather than 1080p, so that the SD resolution is not being stretched as far. All computer video/YouTube video is non-interlaced, meaning editing sequences and exports should be done as Progressive.

                 

                Ah, this is the specific kind of information I was after, so thank you!

                • 5. Re: I'm looking for "best practices" advice for a project setup (Premiere CS5.5, Windows 7 Pro)
                  Peferling Level 4

                  I feel as if I've been given some leftover meatloaf and asked to reheat and spice it up to make a Filet Mignon. 

                  That's why we get the fun jobs that pay the big bucks.  Even if you explain to the client the cons of up-scaling or polishing a turd, their blank stares means that you're wasting time.  "Ok.  I'll see what I can do."

                  You can render at 4:3 aspect in 720.  The dimensions will be 960x720.