5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 31, 2014 10:52 AM by R Neil Haugen

    Switching from Final Cut to Premier

    Yael Weis

      Hey. Just switched from Final Cut Pro to Premiere. I've followed the instructions regarding converting project with XML file.

      now i can open the project but all files are not connected. for some reason Premier can't locate the files.

      Maybe it's because of the files type? (Apple ProRes 422 HQ, and MOV)

      Generally, What it a good format to convert from MOV files i created with nikon DSLR before starting a Premier project?

      Please save my projects. Thank you!

        • 1. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
          R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          I work on those files "native" in PrPro daily. They should work perfectly. Without PrPro even thinking about anything.

           

          So ... what's the basic data about your setup so we can offer some suggestions?

           

          OS/CPU/RAM/GPU/vRAM, and which precise version of PrPro?

           

          Do you have multiple drives, and if so, what's where and what are the connections?

           

          And of course ... did you go through the Media Browser to navigate to the files on disc, and then say right-click and choose "Import files" ... then go to the Project panel to see if they'd been imported to start working them?

           

          Neil

          • 2. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
            Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Just import the mov's into Premiere.

            Premiere works native with those files, no need to convert.

            Just make sure you copy entire card to hdd first and ingest via Media Browser.

            • 3. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
              Yael Weis Level 1

              Hey,

              Thank you so much for your quick replay.

              I understood that ill have to "link media" for each video in my project,

              cause i had problems with a portable hard disk that used to work on a mac computer 

               

              still, one more question- i'm shooting with nikon d5100 DSLR, creating MOV files.

              when i worked with final cut pro, i used to convert them to "apple pre res" files.

              what is the recommended file type for premier? or is MOV good enough (even though it's very heavy)?


              Thank's!!

              • 4. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
                Yael Weis Level 1

                Thank's, the problem is with a specific existing project that contains many many video's.

                • 5. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
                  Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  I have a D7100 and use the native files.

                  • 6. Re: Switching from Final Cut to Premier
                    R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Yael,

                     

                    PrPro will go through MOV files without any difficulty. My standard footage is MOV from Panny GH3 & Nikon D600. Don't worry about transcoding, or worry about the ProRes & MOV files on the same timeline. At the same frame res/rate they'll coexist just fine.

                     

                    There is a definite difference between hardware needs and what so many seem to think should work. For all the hype about USB3 being just as good as any other external connection ... some USB3 drives on some system's CAN sustain ... a burst ... at the speed claimed. That's ok for much work, but not at all for video. It's SUSTAINED throughput "live" on any particular system with its internal bus & other settings/capabilities and the drive's actual sustained read/write speeds & cache capabilities. The Hardware Forum has a site recommended off it, the Tweaker's Page. Here: Tweakers Page

                     

                    They have several long articles on drive and asset layout/assignments. Including the results of testing various layouts, as EVERYTHING there is from testing on real machines with their own project files which are heavy effects loaded things that rag the crap out of all systems while another part of their Benchmark files monitors computer hardware usage. There's not the surmise or "I just know how this works" ... what they report is hard data. USB3 just can't sustain the read/write speeds for anything but straight reading of some codecs off disc so there's some usability, as I've learned ... one can say have footage on a very fast usb3 flash drive connected directly into a USB3 port and get adequate read-speeds off it. Or do exports to a USB3 drive, which is again a one-way "communication". Other than that, it's internal fast drives (no "green" drives need apply) such as at least 7500rpm if not 10,000rpm or SSD drives ... or RAID's of say 4 or 5 3TB (or four) drives, which in RAID 0 can actually handle all but system/program files for most things.

                     

                    Basically, you want to avoid road-blocks & choke-points, places where your data & program/system needs bang into each other and have to wait a while. If you make at least a decent start on that, the type of codec isn't much of a problem. Especially a 1080 MOV ... that ain't nothin'. Think about what a 6k LOG file does to a system ... 

                     

                    Neil