4 Replies Latest reply on Feb 11, 2015 2:46 AM by davidpricejazzbeard

    Partitioned drive = workflow pros and cons?

    davidpricejazzbeard

      Is there any positives for partitioning an ssd drive for workflow reasons? I'm running the OS (Win 8.1) on samsung 840 PRO, partitioned (186GB for OS, 269GB for data) with an external 1TB (7200) HDD on USB3.

      16GB ram, (It's an Asus N551J). Workflow will be mostly, Photoshop/flash & AE and some C4D.

       

      Came like this from the box, aside from the visual aspect for keeping files on the drive, what are the positives or drawbacks (if any)?

       

      Cannot find any definite answers on partitioning, (whether the data partition would be good for rendering out to?).

      Obviously a 3rd drive is ideal, but that aside. Partition: is it good/bad/doesn't matter either way.

       

      Can anyone shed any more practical light on this?

       

      Many thanks!

        • 1. Re: Partitioned drive = workflow pros and cons?
          markerline Level 4

          If you were working in Premiere it would be highly recommended to have a separate partition for scratch disk and for rendering.  I think Premier folks have 3 partitions usually.  With AE I think you could use 2 partitions, one for the OS and your files and one for scratch disk and rendering, though I would do more research on the term scratch disk and the rendering partition.  If you're doing Cinema 4D you could save all of your renders to a separate partition and make sure you have a backup solution to save all your hard-earned renders in case of system or disk failure.  That way you won't have to waste time re-rendering.  You can just recover your files.  With Photoshop & Flash it doesn't really matter.

           

          The main thing though to remember is that you should always try to separate your OS from your data in most cases.  That way when you have to upgrade Operating Systems, if the transition is not a seamless one by definition, such as the transition from Windows XP to Windows 7 where you had to reinstall the applications, then you don't have to worry about your data files being jumbled up and missing file links in the AE projects.

          • 2. Re: Partitioned drive = workflow pros and cons?
            davidpricejazzbeard Level 1

            Hey Markerline thanks for the reply,

             

            I should have also mentioned, I won't be looking to store any files on the data partition long-term necessarily, but wondered if it was detrimental (create a bottleneck) if I used it to render to, whilst the OS was running on the other partition. -I plan to move rendered files to the external drive (which will be used for reading footage files from) and organising those files there, keeping mostly the data partition clean/empty once a job is complete.

             

            But it sounds from what you describe, that it's a good thing? Data storage is definitely to be held on the external HDD for the most part.

             

            I'll look more into the scratch disk/rendering partition too, thank you for that!

            • 3. Re: Partitioned drive = workflow pros and cons?
              markerline Level 4

              as long as there is no bottle neck on your external drive.  are you using eSata or Thunderbolt?  You need something fast when you're going to be reading the rendered files into an AE project or a Premier project or any video project.  If you have a Flash file and you're using ActionScript to load rendered animation frames to create a movie in Flash then the same thing applies.  You need a fast connection or cable.

              • 4. Re: Partitioned drive = workflow pros and cons?
                davidpricejazzbeard Level 1

                Yes, USB3.0 - I read that the data transfer is superior to even thunderbolt in that regard, so that should be fine. (This is using actual & not theoretical information comparing the two). It seems Thunderbolt has theoritcally much more speed but, when using external drives the bottleneck brings it down to the same as USB3... I guess some practical experience (coming up shortly) will see how this pans out.