14 Replies Latest reply on Mar 29, 2015 1:59 PM by smoothsea

    meaning of colored lines and boxes

    redbourn Level 1

      As some of you already know, I'm a real newbie with InDesign, just a couple of days, so thank for your patience.

       

      I just changed a page size so it's not surprising that things got messed up.

       

      Anyway it's a good time to ask about the different colored lines and the two squares in the image.

       

      What do they all signify?

       

      Michael

       

      BTW - I did search on the Internet before coming here and didn't find the answer. And I have two long tutorials but the answers could be anywhere on them.

       

      lines and boxes.jpg

        • 1. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

          The indicated box on the left is the In Port on the text frame, and the little triangle indicates it is not the first frame in a text thread. Click the yellow box to activate live corner effects.

           

          The color of a frame bounding box is determined by the color assigned to a layer in the Layers panel. Default the first layer is assigned a Cyan color. In addition to the frame edges, your screen shot shows a bleed boundary guide set in Document Setup, the page boundary, and the margin guides from page setup.

           

          Has anyone recommended that you should pick up a copy of Sandee Cohen's Visual QuickStart Guide to InDesign?

          • 2. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
            redbourn Level 1

            Thank you.

             

            I will check out Sandee Cohen's Visual QuickStart Guide to InDesign

             

            I have good tutorials which I'm watching but it would be nice to have the really needed right in front of me

             

            What is the "In Port" ?

             

            Which color is the bleed guide?


            I do know Premiere and Photoshop pretty well which makes this a bit easier.

             

            Michael

            • 3. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
              John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              What is the "In Port" ?

              Text frames can be threaded. That is, text can flow from one to the next to the next, and so on. The active in-port (shown active by the arrow/triangle present) indicates that this is a threaded frame, and it is not the first frame in the thread. Each frame also has an out-port with the same behaviors. If you had 3 threaded frames, they'd go like this

              1. In-port inactive/out-port active

              2. In-port active/out-port active

              3. In-port active/out-port inactive

               

              In your screenshot, the bleed guide is red.

              • 4. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                Every text frame has an in port and an out port. If you show text threads under extras in the view menu you should see lines connecting frames from out port to in port indicating how the text is flowing when you have a threaded frame selected.

                 

                In ports can be empty or have the small triangle indicating more text in a previous frame. Out ports can be empty, have the more text indicator for text in a down-stream frame, or have a red plus sign indicating overset text.

                 

                Bleed guides are Red by default, and will be outside the black page boundary.

                • 5. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                  redbourn Level 1

                  Just so that I can learn and others can too.

                   

                  When I changed from letter to 8.5 x 8.5 the image shows what happened.

                   

                  In my case it's not important as I was only experimenting and learning but if somebody has done a lot of work then how do they get the text boxes and images to reconform to the new size?

                   

                  Thanks,

                   

                  Michael

                  • 6. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                    Test Screen Name Most Valuable Participant

                    As with so many things, knowing the jargon is half the battle. I think that if you now read about "master pages" it will help you.

                    • 7. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                      redbourn Level 1

                      I'm reading and watching but don't want to get to far and then have to start from the very beginning again.

                       

                      I will check out master pages.

                       

                      Thanks.

                       

                      Michael

                      • 8. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                        Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                        Far better to do your training BEFORE you something as complex as your book project.

                        • 9. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                          redbourn Level 1

                          I am doing a lot of study and am applying what I'm learning to what I'm posting.

                           

                          I feel the need to try and put into practice what I'm reading about and seeing in vids.

                           

                          I'm not yet composing the book but am trying things and learning from what goes wrong.

                           

                          Would be impossible, for me anyway, to read a large book and watch a several hour course and then sit down and try to do the book.

                           

                          Thanks,

                           

                          Michael

                          • 10. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                            Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                            Makes sense to try what you read. You might like the InDesign Classroom in a Book which is built around hands-on projects with demonstration files.

                            • 11. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                              redbourn Level 1

                              Thanks.

                               

                              I will check out the Classroom in a Book.

                               

                              I started reading, "Visual Quickstart" yesterday.

                               

                              Michael

                              • 12. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                                Test Screen Name Most Valuable Participant

                                There are different ways to learn the detail, but sometimes you miss the big picture. I'd like to share my tips from learning the hard way the first time I composed a book length work. My advice:

                                 

                                1. It's very easy to change the font and style. NEVER DO IT DIRECTLY. Instead, use styles (more learning, but not very difficult). Otherwise you can face the nightmare where you need to change a font, a size, a style throughout and seek out every one. Also, styles make for a clean, consistent look to the whole book.

                                 

                                2. Don't try to write your book and lay out your book at the same time. It's heartbreaking to fiddle with the layout to get it right, then find that you change some earlier text because you need to say something else, only to break the layout. For a book that is mostly text, type it all out first, perhaps in Word (others may have different advice). Tune it, polish it, have it read, proof read it, fix it. When you are really happy with it, take it to layout. Of course, play with layout as you go, but always assume you will revisit the original document and lay it out again.

                                 

                                3. If you have pictures, carefully assemble them into a folder, with well chosen names. Unless your layout is very picture heavy, just put markers in the text where they will be. Then layout is a quick job, and you can always find your graphics again. NEVER PASTE IN GRAPHICS, always place them.

                                • 13. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                                  redbourn Level 1

                                  Thanks for the tips based on your experience.

                                   

                                  Right now I am selecting open fonts because I will be using fractions. Minion Pro and one other for headings and recipe text, and I will check out a second compatible pro one later today.

                                   

                                  http://bonfx.com/19-top-fonts-in-19-top-combinations/   has some really great info - for me anyway.

                                   

                                  And I am learning about character and paragraph styles.

                                   

                                  The book is not a regular cookbook per say and will be entitled something similar to, Tips, Tips & Substitutes, Plus 25 Easy But Tasty Recipes That Really Work - or something like that.

                                   

                                  It's for novice cooks with the emphasis on the tips and tricks, with recipes that they can make that use them.

                                   

                                  So once I get a page format for the recipes similar to http://misconceptions.us/indesign/text-and-image.jpg the only thing that will change in them will be the recipes themselves.

                                   

                                  There will be chapter headings for chicken, beef and pork etc. and each will refer to a chapter on tips and another one to substitutes.

                                   

                                  All the recipes are presently in plain .txt format and have already been proofread once and are now being proofread by a second person.

                                   

                                  I have proofread for a couple of authors but it's hard for some reason to proofread what you wrote yourself.

                                   

                                  Each recipe will have a full size photo on a facing page, and I bought a quality camera last week and a macro lens will be arriving on Tuesday.

                                   

                                  I will then cook every recipe (again) and photograph it and two other people will cook them too and give me feedback.

                                   

                                  I want the recipes to be as foolproof as possible because it's so sad to follow a recipe precisely and then it doesn't work out well.

                                   

                                  The recipes will all have pounds and metric, the ingredients will be in order of importance.

                                   

                                  The portion sizes and timings will be very accurate which are two things which are often way off in a great many online recipes.

                                   

                                  Michael

                                  • 14. Re: meaning of colored lines and boxes
                                    smoothsea Level 3

                                    Hi Michael,

                                     

                                    "The recipes will all have pounds and metric, the ingredients will be in order of importance."

                                     

                                    I would strongly recommend that you list your ingredients in the order that they are used in the method. This is standard practice and it makes the recipe much easier to follow. My wife edits cookbooks for a living and this is one of the first changes she makes to supplied text.

                                     

                                    I'd also like to reinforce the advice above regarding paragraph and character (and object) styles. Always use them - your life will be so much easier!

                                     

                                    Good luck and regards,

                                     

                                    Malcolm