1 2 Previous Next 44 Replies Latest reply on May 5, 2015 2:03 PM by jdecker1978

    Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!

    jdecker1978 Level 1

      So I don't print many large prints. I have a good offer to hang some large prints on display though, and am going to do some cheap costco 20x30's. I shoot with a Canon 6D. 240 ppi. When I am exporting these images to my mac to upload to costco, should I leave the res at 240ppi in the export box? I know so many people say 300Dpi not ppi, and I still can't grasp if it even matters. I have read it doesn't but I've also read if you export at 240 costco will upsample to 300 where lightrooms up sampling is far better. Can someone finally solve this confusion for me?

        • 1. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
          dj_paige Level 9

          Lightroom exports (and digital photos in general) work in PPI, not DPI.

           

          I don't know if Costco upsamples to 300 ppi as I don't work with them, but I'd be surprised if they did that, that's effectively making up pixels for some reason, and I don't think printers do that.

           

          So, having said all that, its not clear to me what specifically you don't grasp.

          • 2. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
            trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            With the Export module Image Sizing> 'Resize to Fit' checked AND in or cm selected the 'Resolution' value is used. For example you enter:

             

            Resize to Fit = Checked

            Long Edge = 20"

            Resolution = 300

             

            The image file's Long Edge = 20 x 300 = 6,000 pixels. The short edge will be proportionally correct, which in this case is 16 x 300 = 4,800 pixels.

             

            The Costco Noritsu printer is 300 dpi, which means a 16" x 20" print requires an image file of 4,800 x 6,000 pixels. Your Canon 6D's resolution is 3,648 x 5,472, which is lower resolution. You have the option to allow LR to upscale the image file to 4,800 x 6,000 pixels by using the above settings. From my experience you will probably get just as good (if not better) results by Exporting the image full-size without Resizing. The Nortisu printer will upsize your native camera resolution 3,648 x 5,472 file and apply the appropriate sharpening for the selected paper type (Gloss or Matte). Make sure to uncheck 'Auto Correct' when placing your order or additional color and toning corrections will be applied to your LR adjusted image.

            • 3. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
              Joshua Cohen Level 3

              Basically the number of pixels in your file and the size of the print you want will determine the output PPI (pixels per inch) by simple division. Most printers have a recommended target resolution based on their printing equipment. You will get the most control of your output if you provide a file who's pixel dimensions results in the recommended target resolution for the given print size. If costco recommends a 300 ppi image and you want a 20 x 30 output then ideally you should provide a 6000 x 9000 pixel file. What will costco do if you provide a smaller file for that output size? My guess is they will scale within some range but really you'd have to ask them to be sure.

               

              EDIT: I took the liberty of looking at the Costco site (which of course you could have done yourself too) and found this link

               

              http://www.costcophotocenter.com/Help/#/topic/ordering-prints

               

              If you click the Recommended Print Resolutions link you will see that they actually recommend 150 ppi so you need to provide a file 3000 x 4500 for 20x30.

              • 4. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Joshua Cohen wrote:

                EDIT: I took the liberty of looking at the Costco site (which of course you could have done yourself too) and found this link

                 

                http://www.costcophotocenter.com/Help/#/topic/ordering-prints

                 

                If you click the Recommended Print Resolutions link you will see that they actually recommend 150 ppi so you need to provide a file 3000 x 4500 for 20x30.

                 

                Both images will be upscaled by the Costco Noritsu (or Epson for posters) printer engine. I think you'll agree that in the case here (16" x 20" @ 300 dpi) the native resolution 20.2 Megapixel camera image file is going to produce better print quality than a resized 13.5 Megapixel image file.

                • 5. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                  dj_paige Level 9

                  The Costco Noritsu printer is 300 dpi, which means a 16" x 20" print requires an image file of 4,800 x 6,000 pixels.

                  Okay, so my knowledge of printers is somewhat low, but didn't you just confuse dpi with ppi, and assume that one implies the other?

                  • 6. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                    Joshua Cohen Level 3

                    trshaner wrote:

                     

                    Joshua Cohen wrote:

                    EDIT: I took the liberty of looking at the Costco site (which of course you could have done yourself too) and found this link

                     

                    http://www.costcophotocenter.com/Help/#/topic/ordering-prints

                     

                    If you click the Recommended Print Resolutions link you will see that they actually recommend 150 ppi so you need to provide a file 3000 x 4500 for 20x30.

                     

                    Both images will be upscaled by the Costco Noritsu (or Epson for posters) printer engine. I think you'll agree that in the case here (16" x 20" @ 300 dpi) the native resolution 20.2 Megapixel camera image file is going to produce better print quality than a resized 13.5 Megapixel image file.

                    I didn't look to see what printer Costco uses. I just found what resolution they recommend.

                    • 7. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                      Joshua Cohen Level 3

                      dj_paige wrote:

                       

                      The Costco Noritsu printer is 300 dpi, which means a 16" x 20" print requires an image file of 4,800 x 6,000 pixels.

                      Okay, so my knowledge of printers is somewhat low, but didn't you just confuse dpi with ppi, and assume that one implies the other?

                       

                      A printers dpi reflect the maximum ppi it can produce. There's no point sending more pixels since it will result in multiple pixels mapping to the same dot. Note that another important property of a printer is it's drop size. The smallest drop of ink relates to the available colors (what inks can mix from the different inkwells) rather than the smallest dot it can produce. Also paper has an important role is maximum dpi regardless of the printers spec. If the paper allows the dot to spread it will reduce the resolution. Perhaps this is why Costco's recommended resolution is so much lower than it's reported printer's capability.

                      • 8. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                        trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Joshua Cohen wrote:

                        If the paper allows the dot to spread it will reduce the resolution. Perhaps this is why Costco's recommended resolution is so much lower than it's reported printer's capability.

                        The required print DPI is dependent on viewing distance:

                         

                        http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/article_pages/print_viewing_distance.html

                         

                        A 4" x 6" print is going to be held by hand at a close viewing distance of about 10" to 24." At 24" the human eye can see up about 286 ppi under ideal conditions. A 16" x 20" print is normally viewed at a further distance of 36" to 72" and requires 191 dpi and 115 dpi respectively. Costco (and other printer services) realize a lower DPI image will still look sharp at "normal" viewing distances. I discovered this using my first digital camera, which was a 6.2 Megapixel Canon 300D.  I was able to make sharp 6" x 20" prints at Costco even though the actual image file size was only 128 ppi. The Costco Noritsu print engine does a remarkably good job of upscaling the image file and applying paper specific sharpening.

                         

                        • 9. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                          Joshua Cohen Level 3

                          Funny how these issues result in such debate even among experienced knowledgeable people. As i understand it maximum DPI (dots per inch) is a physical property of the printer and it's medium (paper, metal, canvas, etc). PPI (pixels per inch) is a function of the file and output size. You may not be able to realize the PPI available to your file if your printer/medium combination do not support it. I don't dispute that the optimal DPI (as distinct from maximum DPI) is determined by viewing distance (among other things). But few output devices support dpi above 300.

                          • 10. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                            trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            Joshua, I'm sorry if you feel there's a "debate." I agree with everything you've stated except for the reason Costco's recommended resolution is lower than the printer DPI. In reality the human eye's resolving capability is based on viewing distance. For larger print sizes (i.e. 16" x 20") normally viewed at greater distances the PPI@Print Size can be less than Printer DPI. This is based on actual physiological test data.

                             

                            However, if you view a print from a close distance of say 10" you're going to see a difference if the camera resolution@print size is less than the printer's DPI. Optimally the camera file DPI at the target print size should match the printer's PPI. To meet this criteria for a 16" x 20" print you would need a 28.8 Megapixel camera (or higher) with a well-performing lens.

                             

                            Peace

                            • 11. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                              Joshua Cohen Level 3

                              Peace to you too, brother.

                              • 12. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                jdecker1978 Level 1

                                Thank you all for the information. I will upload the file at its standard resolution. Every page I go to people have different views. "PPI doesn't matter export at full res is the best", is usually what I find so thats what I'll do.

                                I do think the comment "I took the liberty of looking at the Costco site (which of course you could have done yourself too) and found this link", was a little unnecessary. That page says image should be at 150DPI, Lightroom exports at PPI. That confused me. Regardless, you don't have to answer peoples questions here, so the attitude is uncalled for. Maybe you didn't intend for it to come off that way.


                                Again, thanks everyone for their help.

                                • 13. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                  JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                  It seems to me that the labs for the most part are confused about print resolution. A digital image doesn't really have a resolution per se. All it has are pixel dimensions. So if you take an image that is 4000 x 6000 pixels and change the resolution from 72 to 300 or 600, the image will still have the same number of pixels. That resolution setting isn't going to change that. You can do some math to determine the PPI resolution of an image. Divide the pixels by the PPI the you want, and you'll get the size in inches that the image can produce. That's all that setting is good for, really. If you go to Photoshop or some other program that will let you look at file size it will calculate how big the image will be at the stored resolution. But changing that PPI setting has nothing to the quality of the image.

                                  • 14. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                    jdecker1978 Level 1

                                    Thanks Jim that's what I thought that's why I've been so confused.

                                    • 15. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                      thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                      jdecker1978 wrote:

                                      I know so many people say 300Dpi not ppi, and I still can't grasp if it even matters. I have read it doesn't but I've also read if you export at 240 costco will upsample to 300 where lightrooms up sampling is far better. Can someone finally solve this confusion for me?

                                      Start here to get the basics: http://www.digitaldog.net/files/Resolution.pdf

                                       

                                      You can send that output device less than 300PPI data and the rule of always sending that is utter nonsense! Dates back to prepress/halftone printing using what's called a 2X quality factor, this is a different beast.

                                      You can probably go as low as 180-200PPI for such a printer which means you've just enough pixels. Set the size you desire and let the PPI value fall where it will. As pointed out, Your Canon 6D's resolution is 3,648 x 5,472 pixels and if you divide the long axis of your pixels by 30 inches, that works out to 183PPI which is just where you need to be. You can allow LR to interpolate up a tad, it does quite a good job. Maybe 200PPI (30x200 would get you 6000 pixels.

                                      • 16. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                        Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                        jdecker1978,

                                         

                                        I often print 20x30's at costco. They print them using epson (or HP) large format inkjet on fairly good paper. The quality is unbeatable at the price they are asking in my opinion. You can get better color gamut from other printer companies or by printing yourself but you would be hard pressed to get a typical viewer to pick that out. My advice is to download the color profiles that costco provides for their printers through the drycreek website. You also want to make sure you have really optimized your capture sharpening in the Develop panel on your image. Do this at 1:1 zoom and really optimize the sharpening so that you get maximum detail at 1:1 without generating artifacts usually visible as 1 pixel halos around sharp edges. Then go to the print panel to export a jpeg at the size you will print. Set up the paper to 20x30 (custom file dimensions) and lay out the print just as you want. Be aware that there might be some overprint. Set the resolution to 300 ppi. You will be upscaling slightly at this size with that camera but you are better off having Lightroom do it than the costco print server. Use medium sharpening for standard and either matte or glossy paper. Probably the standard paper they use is a photo satin matte so you probably want to use the matte amount of sharpening. Set your jpeg quality to 85-95 (100 is overkill) and gives no visible improvement). Use the costco profile in color management for your costco's large format printer and use perceptual rendering. These profiles using relative rendering sometimes posterize ugly in the highly saturated areas, The perceptual works well. Then print to file. Generally you will want to strip the icc profile from this file. Photoshop does this very simply. Just open it and do save as and deselect the include icc profile option. Then send this file to costco on their web interface. Now this is VERY important. Make sure you upload in full resolution. There is an option to the side of the upload panel that will downscale your files to something that is completely useless at any size above 4x6. You do not want that to happen as it will ruin your print. Now you can print from this file and you will get amazing quality if your costco's photo operators are any good.

                                        • 17. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                          jdecker1978 Level 1

                                          And now Im confused again. Why would I want to upscale? Costcos website specifically says the ideal for 20x30 is 3000x4500 at 150dpi. Ugg this is far to difficult.

                                          • 18. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                            Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                            >As pointed out, Your Canon 6D's resolution is 3,648 x 5,472 pixels and if you divide the long axis of your pixels by 30 inches, that works out to 183PPI which is just where you need to be. You can allow LR to interpolate up a tad, it does quite a good job. Maybe 200PPI (30x200 would get you 6000 pixels.

                                             

                                            digitaldog, I have tested this with the large format printer they use with files from a similar resolution camera and you get visibly better quality by letting Lightroom upscale to 240 to 300 ppi and output sharpening than sending the file at native size. Probably the output sharpening is what's important there. I haven't tested the scaling and sharpening independently I just know that if I compare a file send at 180 ppi native and a file send at 240 ppi upscaled and output sharpened the latter appears to be much sharper as a print and non-photographers seem to prefer it. Even if the original is higher resolution than this (I often deal with ~100 MP stitches)  I see no improvement from going higher than 300 ppi in the jpeg I send. Maybe if I use a magnifying glass but that becomes very esoteric at that point and has nothing to do anymore with how you experience the print as a whole. Their print server ignores the icc profile in files so that's why I tell people to strip it as drycreek advises you to do. This saves you 2 MB in upload size as these profiles are that large. Unfortunately Lightroom does not have the ability to strip print profiles built in. but as I said it doesn't hurt except for your upload bandwidth for a few seconds to keep them in the file.

                                            • 19. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                              jdecker1978 Level 1

                                              Ill take your word for it Jao. Thanks.

                                              • 20. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                >And now Im confused again. Why would I want to upscale? Costcos website specifically says the ideal for 20x30 is 3000x4500 at 150dpi. Ugg this is far to difficult.

                                                 

                                                They probably just want to balance their upload bandwidth a little and prevent people from sending large files. You get perfectly acceptable prints by not upscaling and not doing anything special and just sending them a sRGB jpeg export from your file. My instructions were more for eking out the last little bit of (subjective) quality. Print sharpening really makes a very visible difference as does using the right printing profile. In my opinion upscaling a little and then print sharpening looks better than print sharpening at the native image size but I think opinions can differ on that. The profile is quite important in my opinion as without it prints from costco will come out darker and more plugged up in the shadows than you see on your screen. If you don't care about the shadow area detail that much you might actually prefer the more punchy contrasty shadows that sending sRGB will give you. It can make your whole print feel too dark though.

                                                • 21. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                  jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                  Makes sense....Thanks

                                                  • 22. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                    jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                    Jao do you recommend I also soft proof with the profile? I do calibrate my montitor. Also wondering if you do any brightness or contrast adjustment in the print module for the jpeg. Thanks.

                                                    • 23. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                      thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                                      Jao vdL wrote:

                                                      digitaldog, I have tested this with the large format printer they use with files from a similar resolution camera and you get visibly better quality by letting Lightroom upscale to 240 to 300 ppi and output sharpening than sending the file at native size. Probably the output sharpening is what's important there.

                                                      That's been my experience too. Capture Sharpening in LR along with it's up sampling produced the best output in tests I did using Photoshop's algorithm's, step interpolation and Perfect Resize. The output was to an Epson.

                                                       

                                                      jdecker1978, IF the lab suggests 150PPI, then you may want to go that route. Otherwise the upsizing we're talking about, 180PPI - 240PPI can be done from LR no problem. A good clean digital image from raw can be resized up 200% and produce a very acceptable print.

                                                      • 24. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                        jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                        The lab suggests 150 DPI not PPI.

                                                        • 25. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                          Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                          >Jao do you recommend I also soft proof with the profile?


                                                          Yeah that is always a good idea if you have a well calibrated monitor. It will allow you to get a better idea of what will change and you can correct if necessary. If you have lots of heavily saturated color it can be significant.

                                                           

                                                          Regarding the 150 dpi the lab suggests, remember that they are a consumer oriented place. I do not think much thought went into it but for making sure that they don't scare off people that print cellphone size pictures or pictures from point-and-shoots many of which are around that point now. I don't think they mean to say that if you have higher resolution it's not going to matter, just that they recommend 150 dpi as sort of the minimum for a good quality print.

                                                          • 26. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                            jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                            Jai what was your thoughts with the added brightness in the print module? I know a lot of people us this but Im curious about Costco in particular.

                                                            • 27. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                              Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                              If you use the profiles and your screen is well calibrated you do not need to do that at all. A lot of this is coming from people with badly calibrated screens and from people sending sRGB data. The latter as I said above gives you much darker shadows than you will see on your screen on a well calibrated monitor.

                                                              • 28. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                                                                jdecker1978 wrote:

                                                                 

                                                                The lab suggests 150 DPI not PPI.

                                                                The file is PPI. The output device is DPI. You will send 150PPI.

                                                                • 29. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                  landoloons Level 1

                                                                  The answer is so simple, in a sense, that many refuse to accept it.  It is this:  to a photographer ordering prints from a typical print vendor, DPI and PPI values are completely irrelevant.  It simply does not matter what DPI or PPI values are in the files you produce - those numbers are meaningless in this context.  The printer will take the file you give him, and upsize it as necessary to print at the resolution you've paid for.  And typically we don't even get to choose that print resolution.   For example, I sell prints through Fine Art America and I actually don't know what resolution (PPI) they print at - I believe it's surprisingly low, maybe 150, which is why they'll sell my photos at larger sizes than some other print vendors will.

                                                                   

                                                                  If you really want to, you can find out the PPI at which your photo will be printed, and upsize it yourself to the exact printed size.  The print vendor (actually his printer and software) will then not modify the file, it will be printed just as you supplied it.   But you will gain nothing from going through these extra steps, the result will be indistinguishable from a print for which your original file was upsized by the printer.  I seriously doubt that Lightroom's upsizing is better than that of a printer driver.

                                                                  • 30. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                    Joshua Cohen Level 3

                                                                    While it is true that the DPI or PPI metadata tags in the file are irrelevant the actual PPI (the pixels provided in your file divided by the requested output size) certainly DOES matter. Upsizing within some tolerance may be acceptable (subjective) within some range whether done by the printer driver or Lightroom. But too much will lead to disappointment. Some vendors may allow more upsizing than others for a variety of reasons (ie marketing) but their opinion of the tolerable output may be different from yours. This is the main reason for doing the upsizing yourself in Lightroom. It's not that Lightroom is better at it (it may or may not be). It's that you can see the result and get some idea if the final output will be acceptable.

                                                                    • 31. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                      trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                                      GEEK WARNING - Not for the faint off heart!


                                                                      Costco Color Profile & Soft Proof

                                                                      A while ago I  spoke with the Lab manager at my Ocean, NJ Costco and ran some tests using the Dry Creek Costco printer profiles. Please read from Reply #23 through #30 here:

                                                                       

                                                                      Re: LR 4.2 convert or embed color profiles?

                                                                       

                                                                      The test results are in reply #28 for the Costco Noritsu printer, which is used for 12" x 18" and smaller. I didn't test the Epson 7880 inkjet printer used for 16" x20" and 20" x 30" prints. However, it has the same or wider gamut as the Noritsu printer so the results should be similar.

                                                                       

                                                                      Costco Print DPI Requirement

                                                                      I also tested the DPI requirement of the Costco JPEG print file. Again this was with the Noritsu printer, but results should be similar with the Espon 7880 when making 16" x 20" and 20" x 30".

                                                                       

                                                                      I created a 125 DPI/PPI resolution image crop file and then upscaled (i.e. Resize) the same file to 300 DPI/PPI file. I created two 8" x 12" layouts using four different LR Output Sharpening setting (None, Gloss Low, Gloss Standard, Gloss High).

                                                                       

                                                                      Below are the two files uploaded to Costco. Examining the actual Costco Noritsu Gloss prints the native 125 DPI image was very good even when viewed at close distance, but the upscaled 300DPI/PPI image was slightly softer. So at least for the Costco Noritsu printer there appears to be no benefit in upscaling a lower DPI/PPI resolution image to 300 DPI in LR. This is a 2.4x (300/125) upscale factor.

                                                                       

                                                                      For lower upscale factors (<2.0x) when using the Epson 7880 inkjet printer the results may be better. The recommended file resolution for the Epson is 360 DPI, which is what the OP will need to use for making a 20' x 30" print at Costco. The only way to find out is to make two prints: 1) one with no LR Resize and 2) one with 360 PPI LR Resize. Make sure to apply the appropriate Output Sharpening to both, which is probably Matte Standard.

                                                                       

                                                                      I used a Canon 5D MKII 21 Mp (5616 x 3744) image file for the below test. At 125 DPI the full-size print would be 30" x 45" in size. What you are seeing below is a 4" x 6" crop from the full-size 30" x 45" image in an 8" x 12" print with four different Output Sharpening settings.

                                                                       

                                                                      To download the files for viewing, right-click on the picture, select 'Save Image As,' and download the JPEG file.

                                                                       

                                                                      (1800 x 1200 8" x 12" JPEG Costco Print File)

                                                                      No Resample 125dpi 8x12.jpg

                                                                       

                                                                      (3600 x 2400 8" x 12" JPEG Costco Print File)

                                                                      Resample 300dpi 8x12.jpg

                                                                      • 32. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                        jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                                        Well you all have managed to confuse me more than I was originally. I set up a 20x30 in the print module of Lightroom cc, and exported one photo at 150ppi and one at 300ppi. Using the costco profiles. Im not sure what this means but when I open the two resulting images on my retina iMac, the 300ppi is sharper. Because Jao has experience with costco and 20x30's, I'm going to use this method. Thanks again everyone.

                                                                        • 33. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                          Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                                          Let us know how it comes out!

                                                                          • 34. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                            landoloons Level 1

                                                                            As I said, it's really so simple that... well...

                                                                             

                                                                            If you specify a print size and resolution (DPI) for a Lightroom export, you're doing the resizing yourself.  So if one export is 150 DPI and the other is 300 DPI, of course the 300 DPI looks better on your display - it's at twice the resolution.

                                                                             

                                                                            What you want to do is crop your image to the aspect ratio you want it printed at, then export it full size (JPG or TIFF) and send that to the printer. Do not specify DPI or physical dimensions; the printer will manage those values.   Just give the printer as many sensor pixels as you can, at the desired aspect ratio, and forget about DPI, PPI, and inches.

                                                                             

                                                                            You can spend endless time resizing the output yourself, for the specific print size and DPI value that will be used, and you will in all likelihood gain nothing.  Absolutely optimum upsizing is printer-specific.  Lightroom can't do better than the printer driver (or RIP) itself, which was written by engineers at the company that built the printer, i.e. HP or Epson.  They had access to the deepest proprietary knowledge of their particular printer's technology and characteristics - how the ink behaves on a specific paper, how the colors bleed and blend.  All LR can do is interpolate pixel values in a generic way.

                                                                             

                                                                            Free your mind of DPI, PPI and any notion of physical inches, and you will experience photo printing satori.

                                                                            • 35. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                              jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                                              That part makes sense. If I export through the print module I can set up the printer profile which is said to help with prints coming out too dark. I have to enter a resolution here.

                                                                              • 36. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                                landoloons Level 1

                                                                                I never export through the print module.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Yes, prints often come back unexpectedly dark.  The way to deal with that is to order a couple of samples first and adjust your on-screen thinking - about brightness and contrast - accordingly.   Using a printer profile and 'soft proofing' can't tell you how bright a print will look; that depends on paper and ink.  Soft proofing helps mainly with color decisions.

                                                                                • 37. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                                  trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                                                  Exactly, as landoloons says....and I said in my rely #31 showing the Costco test results "there appears to be no benefit in upscaling a lower DPI/PPI resolution image to 300 DPI in LR."

                                                                                   

                                                                                  You can use the LR Export module with the following settings to create a JPEG file with no resizing. For 20" x 30" print size Costco Photo Satin paper is used. Use the Satin (stn) Costco paper profile and Output Sharpening for that paper type (Matte). This of course assumes you are requesting 20" x 30" print size, which targets the Epson 7880 ink jet printer. You'' need to download the profiles for you specific Costco location here: Digital photo lab profiles

                                                                                   

                                                                                  There are much more detailed instructions at Dry Creek for making Costco Poster Prints. Please don't shoot the messenger....it is what it is.

                                                                                   

                                                                                  http://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/CostcoPosterPrinters.html

                                                                                  • 38. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                                    jdecker1978 Level 1

                                                                                    I did this method and the resulting jpegs are significantly larger files than if I don't click resize to fit. And are you saying that you entering 300 ppi was unnecessary?

                                                                                    • 39. Re: Why can't I grasp print resolution?!?!
                                                                                      landoloons Level 1

                                                                                      If LR isn't resizing (the "Resize to Fit" box is unchecked) then yes, the PPI value should be irrelevant.  

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