13 Replies Latest reply on Apr 30, 2015 5:09 AM by bitm07

    Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations

    bitm07 Level 1

      I use a Manfrotto 055X Pro tripod with a Manfrotto 332RC2 head, when mirror lock is utilized, this set-up produces excellent results. There is however a slight vibration when the mirror is raised, then again after the image has been captured. A bracketed set of images therefore, do not align perfectly. The auto align option in Lightroom CC's Photo Merge HDR feature, copes well with this. I can not help, but wonder, if a perfectly aligned set of RAW images would produced superior HDR images.

       

      Do you guy's, who use more expensive (and presumably superior) tripods and heads find that your bracketed images align perfectly or do you still use Photo Merge HDR's auto align option ?.

        • 1. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          I use an even lighter tipod, and have no issues.

          But I do use a cable release, or if I've forgotten that, the self timer.

          Pressing the shutter by hand could certainly cause bad alignment.

          • 2. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
            bitm07 Level 1

            Per Berntsen wrote:

             

            I use an even lighter tipod, and have no issues.

            But I do use a cable release, or if I've forgotten that, the self timer.

            Pressing the shutter by hand could certainly cause bad alignment.

            I use a Canon 5D Mk II, with remote cord. 

            • 3. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
              Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

              I use a Nikon D800E, with a 24 mm lens, or shorter. What focal lenghts do you use?

              The longer the focal length, the greater the risk for poor alignment.

              • 4. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                Rafael Aviles Level 3

                If you use mirror lock, there should be no effect on the shot from the vibrations that occur when mirror is raised, just make sure you wait long enough for them to dissipate. And, how would the mirror vibrations AFTER the image has been captured affect the shot?

                 

                Another thing to check: make sure the Vibration reduction (VR) or Image Stabilization (IS) is turned OFF if you have the camera on the tripod. (Unless your lens has a setting for VR or IS while on a tripod, that is.)

                • 5. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                  Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  The merging actually works quite surprisingly well even with handheld bracket sets in my experience. I normally use nice tripods with very sturdy heads but I looked at some generated handheld and they work just fine. You really shouldn't worry about the tiny movement caused by mirror slap. Of course if you are at very long focal lengths than the situation is different but 35 mm or shorter there really shouldn't be any issue.

                  • 6. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                    bitm07 Level 1

                    Per Berntsen wrote:

                     

                    I use a Nikon D800E, with a 24 mm lens, or shorter. What focal lenghts do you use?

                    The longer the focal length, the greater the risk for poor alignment.

                    Wide angle, normally the 16-35mm f4, the movements is only fractional 1-2 pixels

                    • 7. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                      bitm07 Level 1

                      Rafael Aviles wrote:

                       

                      If you use mirror lock, there should be no effect on the shot from the vibrations that occur when mirror is raised, just make sure you wait long enough for them to dissipate. And, how would the mirror vibrations AFTER the image has been captured affect the shot?

                       

                      Another thing to check: make sure the Vibration reduction (VR) or Image Stabilization (IS) is turned OFF if you have the camera on the tripod. (Unless your lens has a setting for VR or IS while on a tripod, that is.)

                      There's been no noticeable effect on images quality, since I started using mirror lock on the original 5D,  back in 2007.  The fact that bracketed images do not line up precisely didn't bother me at all, until last week, when I started using Lightroom's HDR feature.

                      • 8. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                        bitm07 Level 1

                        Rafael Aviles wrote:

                         

                        And, how would the mirror vibrations AFTER the image has been captured affect the shot?

                        They obviously don't effect the image that have just been captured, but they could effect it's alignment with subsequent images in a bracket sequence.

                        • 9. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                          Rafael Aviles Level 3

                          I doubt that mirror slap would be strong enough to actually move a camera/lens that is mounted on a tripod...

                           

                          I do a lot of focus stacking shots, where I actually touch the camera between shots, to focus manually, and I have not seen any misalignment from that. And I can tell the image moves quite a bit when I touch the focus ring because I am looking at it in Live View mode.

                          • 10. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                            Rafael Aviles Level 3

                            I was just replying to your statement:

                             

                            "There is however a slight vibration when the mirror is raised, then again after the image has been captured. A bracketed set of images therefore, do not align perfectly."

                             

                            How do you know that the bracketed shots do not align precisely? Did you try the HDR with and without Auto-Align?

                            • 11. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                              bitm07 Level 1

                              Rafael Aviles wrote:

                               

                              I was just replying to your statement:

                               

                              "There is however a slight vibration when the mirror is raised, then again after the image has been captured. A bracketed set of images therefore, do not align perfectly."

                               

                              How do you know that the bracketed shots do not align precisely? Did you try the HDR with and without Auto-Align?

                              When the images are viewed at 100% in Photoshop, there is a composition misalignment of a pixel or two.  I havn't tried an HDR with Auto-Align turned off, but logically a pixel or two of misalignment will have a detrimental effect on the final image.

                              • 12. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                                bitm07 Level 1

                                When the images are viewed at 100% in Photoshop, there is a composition misalignment of a pixel or two.

                                500%

                                • 13. Re: Photo Merge HDR and camera vibrations
                                  bitm07 Level 1

                                  Rafael Aviles wrote:

                                   

                                  If you use mirror lock, there should be no effect on the shot from the vibrations that occur when mirror is raised, just make sure you wait long enough for them to dissipate. And, how would the mirror vibrations AFTER the image has been captured affect the shot?

                                   

                                  Another thing to check: make sure the Vibration reduction (VR) or Image Stabilization (IS) is turned OFF if you have the camera on the tripod. (Unless your lens has a setting for VR or IS while on a tripod, that is.)

                                  I think it's the IS, possibly in combination with uneven surfaces (mostly beaches), that's causing the slight image misalignments.

                                   

                                  I captured a series of sunrise images, from a solid surface this morning (UK time), with the IS turned off.  They aligned perfectly, the only image that didn't align was captured from the beach.

                                   

                                  Thanks for your help. I've gone back through my image catalogue and discovered that the vast majority of my bracketed images do align.  I've put those that don't, down to either forgetting to turn off IS, or the surface they were taken from.