9 Replies Latest reply on May 11, 2015 2:32 PM by southernclub

    Advice for an SSD RAID

    southernclub

      I'm looking at getting a new computer with the following:

       

      Xeon E5-2687W V3 3.1GHz Ten Core 25MB 160W

      64GB DDR4-2133 REG ECC (4x16GB)

      GTX 980

      Samsung 850 Pro for OS and Programs

      4 TB drive for Backups

      Asus Thunderbolt 2 card

       

       

      I'm told I need a faster disk setup.  My question is,  if I added a RAID 0 consisting of 4 Intel 730 240 GB SSDs in a Pegasus2, will that be the best idea?  The RAID will have everything but the OS and Programs on it.

        • 1. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
          cc_merchant Level 4

          From Tweakers Page - External Drives

           

          Thunderbolt, which is typically used on Mac's, is a 'new' connection. Well, 'new' is rather doubtful. since it is based on a PCIe-2.0 4x connection with a 10b/8b encoding protocol, that carries a huge overhead (almost 20%) over PCIe-3.0 that uses the 130b/128b scrambling protocol. Thunderbolt is great for laptops. There is no connection faster than that for laptops. It delivers around twice the transfer rate of eSATA, with 10 Gb/s per channel. Effectively it will deliver up to around maximum 950 MB/s transfer rates with 2 or more modern and very fast SSD's in a (r)aid0 configuration. But that is also the downside of Thunderbolt. Adding more SSD's to the (r)aid0 will not improve performance. It is choked. It is almost the same speed an internal (r)aid0 with only 2 SSD's will deliver as a software raid. Nothing more. Thunderbolt 2 delivers around 1350 MB/s maximum transfer rate. Still significantly slower than a dedicated raid controller can achieve.

           

          Apart from the rather limited storage capacity, less than 1 TB, this Pegasus2 solution suffers from choking. 3 SSD's in raid0 use all the bandwidth Thunderbolt2 can offer. The 4-th SSD only adds capacity, no performance increase. A dedicated raid controller is much faster. Still, if you have a good backup plan, this Pegasus2 solution will work nicely. But I would prefer a dedicated raid controller like the Areca ARC-1883iX-12/8G internally. No cable mess, far better performance, future expansion capabilities, more raid levels to choose from, less physical space required. You can easily fit up to 12 SSD's in only two 5¼" bays internally.

          • 2. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
            JEShort01 Level 4

            Since you have an Asus Thunderbolt 2 card, that implies that you have an Asus motherboard. It probably has plenty of spare SATA ports that could handle a 4x Intel 730 SSD RAID 0 configuration.

             

            I have and use Areca cards for my SSD RAID 0 arrays at it works great, however the main reason that I buy those cards is to handle reliable, high speed parity RAID hard drive arrays (RAID 5 or RAID 6) and/or to handle SSD RAIDs containing more than 4 drives.

             

            Regards,

             

            Jim

            • 3. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
              southernclub Level 1

              I don't have the pc yet,  it'll be a new build.  One thing I'm still not sure about is to get that processor or a 5960x.

               

              As for a RAID,  so internal is the way to go.  I should put media,  projects, exports, everything but OS and Programs on a 4 SSD one RAID?  Nothing on a seperate SSD?

              • 4. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                I my opinion what you should do is get an X99 motherboard with an M.2 socket.  Then get yourself a Samsung SM951 512 GB M.2 SSD and forget about RAID. And forget about the Xeon.  Look at my second best PPBM8 results with an overclocked i7-5960X.(you will have to register to see the results).  And this is without any RAID and just a single other SSD drive for the OS/applications.  This is today's architecture without any hard drives in the system.  Of course for backup and archiving I will have some hard drives.

                 

                Eight cores at 4.5 GHz will out perform 10 cores at 3.1 GHz

                • 5. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                  southernclub Level 1

                  Thanks Bill.  The 5960x  processor is a lot cheaper so that'll help the budget.

                  The Mother board I'm looking at is the Asus x99 deluxe.  It has an M2 socket.  So If I get the Samsung,  I use that single SSD for OS,  programs, everything else except backups? 

                  Also,  is there an advantage to the SM951 over other PCIE SSDs?  The vendor I'm looking at has a Intel 750 1.2TB PCI-E SSD which looks good because it's twice the size.

                  • 6. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                    Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    No, continue with your 850 Pro SSD for your OS/Applications and use the m.2 SSD for just your video projects.  I have not used the Intel devices.  If I remember correctly they are optimized for read rates and the write rate is not great.  You could of course use it instead of the SM951 or you may want to also install one of those and for instance use it for you media/media cache storage where read rates are important.

                    • 7. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                      JEShort01 Level 4

                      The Asus x99-Deluxe board supports up to two PCIe M.2 DDSs, so if you can swing the cost (they're not cheap), 2x Samsung SM951 drives would be big and fast. My understanding is that if you have a separate boot drive, you can RAID 0 the M.2 drives.

                       

                      If you are not opposed to overclocking, then the i7-5960x option would definitely outpace the much more expensive e5-2687w.

                       

                      Regards,

                       

                      Jim

                      • 8. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                        Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Jim,

                         

                        That second M.2 capability is by a add-in PCIe x4 card.  Not there is anything wrong with that but do not be disappointed when you buy one and it only has one M.2 socket on the motherboard and you have to use a PCIe slot for the second M.2 device.  I took a quick look for that board part number from Asus but could not find it.anyplace, there are other vendors but you have to be real careful that it is PCIe x4 Gen 3

                         

                        Bill

                        • 9. Re: Advice for an SSD RAID
                          southernclub Level 1

                          Do you have any problems with heat on the Samsung SM 951?