4 Replies Latest reply on May 24, 2015 9:39 AM by TomsTwin

    3D stereoscopic encode

    TomsTwin

      Does anyone know how to encode a 3D media file to burn to a Blu-ray 3D disk so that the player and TV recognize that it is a 3D file? To my understanding, a 3D file consists of 2 full-frame (1920x1080 for each eye) images stacked on top of each other with a 45 pixel border between the two resulting in a total frame size of 1920w x 2205h. After Effects' "3D Glasses" plug-in does produce a, Over-Under layout, but it cuts the vertical resolution in half to fit both images within a 1920x1080 frame size. And, the monitor must be manually set to the Over-under format to show the 3D as opposed to automatically recognizing the 3D file format and switching as when playing a Blu-ray 3D disk.

        • 1. Re: 3D stereoscopic encode
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

          No, that's not how it works. BD 3D uses a differential encoding in a secondary data stream. You can't do it without having access to a respective commercial encoder and authoring tool. It's nothing you can do by just flipping a switch in Adobe Media Encoder or something liek that.

           

          Mylenium

          • 2. Re: 3D stereoscopic encode
            TomsTwin Level 1

            Hmmm... That's interesting and confusing. I got the info from this article.. .How 3D content works: Blu-ray vs. broadcast - CNET. Thanks!

             

            So, does Adobe provide no real option for authoring a 3D Blu-ray?

            • 3. Re: 3D stereoscopic encode
              Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

              The visual manifestation during creating the stereo pairs and of the decoded streams and how it is transported to your screen has nothing to do with the actual encoding and in fact the article does not refer to  BD 3D as in the actual final spec, but early stages where each vendor was doing his own thing by abusing the then existing specs and arbitrary stream formats. Or in other words: This article is pretty much nonsense from today's point of view, even though these "hacked" 3D formats still exist and are used. "Real" BD 3D uses MVC encoding and that is for simple reasons of licensing and the associated cost plus technical requirements for setting the proper authoring code in the streams only available in super-expensive programs like Scenarist BD.

               

              Mylenium

              • 4. Re: 3D stereoscopic encode
                TomsTwin Level 1

                Great... Thanks! That saves me a lot of wasted time in trying to do any more with the Adobe suite.