9 Replies Latest reply on Sep 7, 2016 2:38 PM by Roei Tzoref

    How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?

    mfuchsman

      It's as though we have gone back in time, and not for the better.  I have renders that would take just under four minutes with multiprocessing now taking 15 minutes to complete.  The new release is a huge productivity killer, and the worst thing about it is that with the install of 2015, Adobe has seen fit to remove all previous versions of the software.  Retrieving 2014 will require an entirely new install.  Whoever thought that releasing After Effects in a state that reduces productivity to such an extreme level should seriously have their job security questioned.

        • 1. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
          Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          The Adobe blog addressed this issue. features not available in After Effects CC 2015 (13.5) | After Effects region of interest

          You do have an alternative. The suggested workflow (if you have comps that benefit from multiprocessing) is to work in CC 2015 to enjoy its benefits and then open that same project file in CC 2014 to do your final render.

           

          mfuchsman wrote:

           

          Adobe has seen fit to remove all previous versions of the software.

          The update screen tells you that it's removing old versions and gives you an option to keep them. Granted, that light grey block of text is pretty easy to ignore when the bright blue update button is right there tempting you.

          The good news, is that it's really easy to install CC 2014 again: How to Find and Install Previous Version of Adobe Apps in CC 2015 | Adobe Customer Care Team

          • 2. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
            mfuchsman Level 1

            Adobe's products are ubiquitous in the professional design world.  To tell your customers that you should use a new product because it handles previews better but use an old version of the same product to complete the task is amatuerish.  Further, to ask a user if he or she wants to have the option of saving the old version is also bush league.  First of all, it does get overlooked.  Second, I never figured Adobe would remove an option that would take me so far back in the dark ages of rendering; and third, to tell someone that you should have paid more attention before installing an anticipated update is poor customer service.

            • 3. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
              Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              mfuchsman wrote:

               

              to tell someone that you should have paid more attention before installing an anticipated update is poor customer service.

               

              If Adobe said that, it might be.

              However, I'm just a user like you; I don't speak for Adobe.

              Besides, I didn't say you "should have" paid more attention; I just pointed out that you have an option to keep your old version when you update. I hoped it would be beneficial to you when the next update comes out.

              mfuchsman wrote:

               

              To tell your customers that you should use a new product because it handles previews better but use an old version of the same product to complete the task is amatuerish.

               

              I will grant you that it's a little odd. However, I understand why they're doing it. They've spent the past year with the majority of the AE team dedicated to rewriting the core code to make AE faster. This new architecture isn't totally ready yet, but part of it is. I'm glad they're releasing it to us what they have. For me, the improved expression handling alone makes it worth it. If you don't want this partial version and want to wait for the full blown new architecture with better previews AND better rendering, keep using CC 2014 for now and just wait until the next big update. You can keep CC 2015 around for client compatibility if you need it, but you can keep working in CC 2014 if it's faster for you.

              Me? I've got CS5, CS6, CC, CC 2014, and CC 2015 all on my home machine for just that sort of reason.

              • 4. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                stib_at_work Level 1

                Checked my watch; it's Q3 2016, and still no sign of multiprocessor rendering. And I can't get a real time RAM preview to happen even when it has cached the whole timeline. So what do Adobe do? Release more cloud ********. That's like Brainstorm 2.0 if you ask me, it might appeal to someone, but the pro users want to get their work done and go home on time.

                • 5. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                  Dave LaRonde Level 6

                  This isn't an apology for the current state of After Effects (admittedly dismal) but rather an explanation WHY it's so crummy.

                   

                  For decades -- literally -- Adobe swept the development of improved, faster code under the rug.  The fundamental code of AE, the stuff deep under the hood that made it tick, hadn't been touched since the '90's.  There was always some gee-whiz feature or some minor tweak the Marketing Department wanted to give newer AE versions the appearance of being newer and shinier and sparklier.  Like Brainstorm -- boy, that was an innovation for the ages, wasn't it?

                   

                  Well, the archaic code chickens came home to roost a few years back.  It was time for a massive rewrite of the basic code or run up the white flag in terms AE's significance as an effects and compositing application.  The AE team dug in and began.

                   

                  Well, guess what?  The team encountered problems.  The Adobe Marketing Department, which gets my vote as the villain in all of this, was relentless in demanding those semi-useful sparklies.  Hardware architecture changed.  Operating systems changed.  More and newer hardware emerged... ever hear of an 8K camera four years ago?

                   

                  And the last time I heard, there were just twelve people on the AE team.  That's it.  A dozen folks to totally revise AE under the hood.  To ensure the software would work on emerging operating systems.  To write its own version of Quicktime, which only Apple seems to have abandoned.  To accommodate new types of hardware.

                   

                  Cracks appeared in the AE facade as the team tried to keep up with the demands.  Multiprocessing disappeared.   The software wouldn't always work properly on newer OS's.  A new bug fix would create newer bugs where none previously existed.

                   

                  So why the hell didn't Adobe just recruit more software engineers to help the AE Team right the ship?  You've got me by the short hairs.  I don't think Adobe executives give a rat's *** about AE -- software that in the grand scheme of things is only used by a handful of people -- as long as it works.... sort of.

                   

                  But the practice seems to be working.  Adobe keeps holding that carrot out in front of the users that things are going to be GREAT in the future... but Adobe doesn't way WHEN things will be great.  Besides, you're on Creative Cloud!  You're stuck!  You abandon Adobe software now and it stops working in three months!  The software rental money keeps rolling in, and top-level Adobe executives have little to no incentive to make an earnest effort to make things better.

                   

                  So to summarize the contributing factors to lousy software: outdated code... overworked staff... technology changes... unrealistic marketing demands... uncaring top-level management... and a captive user base.

                   

                  Any wonder why AE pretty much sucks compared to Days of Yore?

                  • 6. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                    Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Dave LaRonde wrote:

                     

                    For decades -- literally -- Adobe swept the development of improved, faster code under the rug. The fundamental code of AE, the stuff deep under the hood that made it tick, hadn't been touched since the '90's.

                    ...

                     

                    Well, the archaic code chickens came home to roost a few years back. It was time for a massive rewrite of the basic code or run up the white flag in terms AE's significance as an effects and compositing application. The AE team dug in and began.

                    ...

                    Any wonder why AE pretty much sucks compared to Days of Yore?

                     

                    For what it's worth, it feels like we've crested the hill of awful and are starting to come down into usefulness again. The latest update is a really nice experience on both my Mac and Windows machines and some of the changes mentioned in their "upcoming sneak peak" videos from IBC of the next version look to make it even more useful. Still no multiprocessing replacement (except for the C4D renderer which is multithreaded), but a lot of other useful enhancements.

                     

                    It feels like we are starting to see the fruit of the re-architecture of the core code now. Hopefully the next version continues the course of improvement I've seen in 13.8.1.

                    • 7. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                      Dave LaRonde Level 6

                      Yeah, they keep holding that carrot out there, don't they, Szalam?   I, for one, will believe it when I see it and not a second earlier.  Adobe's corporate behavior has changed my attitude about their software from that of a skeptic to a profound cynic.

                      • 8. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                        Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        I dunno. AE seems like it is headed in the right direction and I'm seeing it now - I am enjoying working with CC 2015.3.1. I haven't needed to jump to an older version at my freelance studio since CC 2015.3 came out.

                         

                        I just wish it would go in the right direction more quickly. I have some monster machines and they just sit there, processors mostly idle, when working with AE; that's my only frustration.

                         

                        I know the AE team is working on a new, mo' bettah rendering solution and I look forward to when it comes! In the meantime, look at how much faster Lumetri is with the GPU acceleration! It might become my go-to effect for most color correction/color grading tasks.

                        • 9. Re: How can Adobe remove multiprocessor rendering from a release and not provide an alternative?
                          Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional
                          dunno. AE seems like it is headed in the right direction and I'm seeing it now - I am enjoying working with CC 2015.3.1. I haven't needed to jump to an older version at my freelance studio since CC 2015.3 came out.

                          I agree. besides I believe Dave Rant's are embedded within his circuitry, he can't be content or it would not be Dave. at this moment Ranting about the same topic in two forums mind you Super Dave.

                           

                          look at how much faster Lumetri is with the GPU acceleration!

                          I was pretty psyched about Lumetri. especially with the instant rewarding WB selector. but then Jarle cooled of my enthusiasm with his tutorial saying Lumetri is really Limitri... Limitations in the Lumetri Color Panel – PremierePro.net