4 Replies Latest reply on Jul 4, 2015 6:30 AM by tvekic

    My character image imported from Illustrator in after effects becomes pixelated and blurry every time I click and drag on a body part of my character.

    tvekic

      Hi, I imported my character profile from Illustrator into After Effects but every time I click on a body part and drag the whole image goes all pixelated. Once I have dragged the body part to the spot i need it and let go, the image is crisp again. How do I stop the pixelisation from happening!!??

        • 1. Re: My character image imported from Illustrator in after effects becomes pixelated and blurry every time I click and drag on a body part of my character.
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          It is called adaptive resolution and you can set the options in your preferences. This is normal. You can turn it off in the using the Fast Previews options in the Composition Panel, but then you may run into other problems. It all depends on your system.

          Screen Shot 2015-07-04 at 4.43.05 AM.png

          You should spend some time learning about the user interface and how AE works. There are lots of good resources available in the Search Help field at the top right corner of AE.

          • 2. Re: My character image imported from Illustrator in after effects becomes pixelated and blurry every time I click and drag on a body part of my character.
            tvekic Level 1

            Ok thank you for that.. But that setting wont effect the animation after it has been rendered, will  it?

             

            Sorry to add to the list of questions... I am overly new at Adobe After Effects...

             

            1) I wanted to ask, I want to create a project that I can burn to a DVD... I am located in Australia so i assume PAL DVD players.... But i also read that PAL DVD players can also play NTSC as well..... So... is there possibly a universal preset that I can go with in After Effects to run with so that my animation can be played on most DVD players?

             

            Should I go with NTSC DV Widescreen or NTSC DV Widescreen 23.976 .. or...? And what should my Pixel Aspect Ratio be?

             

            2) I read somewhere when rendering a project in Ae, to no render it as a MPEG2 file.... But first render it in another format (the poster didnt mention which format.. Please help me out here too) and then send it to Adobe Encore to then convert the Ae file to MPEG2 and burn to a DVD.... Is this correct and the best way to go about it?

             

            3) I want to create an animation that is 10minutes or so long. Should I do this in one file in After Effects or should I break them into smaller sizes.. so work on maybe 2minutes of the animation at a time then combine?? And if I were to do it 2 minutes at a time, what is the best way to combine the clips or scenes or whatever into one flowing animation?

             

            3) I created a character profile in Illustrator .. Should I set the Artboard preset to the same one im using in Ae?

             

            4) I was also wondering just say for example sake, that I set the Preset in Ae as NTSC DV Widescreen. In my composition, if I want to use a camera to zoom in to a section, will that camera retain the same resolution... Can i do that ??? where in my stage, I have a larger scene (say for example, a house with trees surrounding it) and then i want the camera to zoom in to the house only.... (forgive me if this is the stupid question)......

             

            I really appreciate the help!!!

            • 3. Re: My character image imported from Illustrator in after effects becomes pixelated and blurry every time I click and drag on a body part of my character.
              Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Please start here: Basic Workflow

               

              What you see when you are dragging things around will not happen when the video is rendered. I would always use Square Pixel comps and I would use Encore the author your DVD. It's important to know that After Effects is not designed to create movies, it is designed and useful for creating special effect shots, composites, and motion graphics. More than 90% of my AE comps are 4 or 5 seconds and single shots. A few are 4 or 5 shot sequences, and a very few are longer than 30 seconds. You create your effects shots in After Effects then you edit in Premiere Pro, then you author your DVD in Encore. You can compress in Encore or by using the Adobe Media Encoder. The workflow depends entirely on how you intend to deliver your content.

               

              Personally I haven't authored a DVD in more than 4 years because I do not have a single client that wants one. I have authored a few BluRay disks but mostly I just deliver h.264 for playback in web apps, on mobile devices, through things like Apple TV or for distribution on YouTube or Vimeo. The adobe media encoder has presets for those formats.

               

              When working in Illustrator all of your artwork must exist inside a single artboard. I haven't worked in SD at all for years because everything now is HD at minimum. Even a cheapie phone shoots HD video. You can always downsize in your authoring programs like Encore or when you Compress your video. This means any Illustrator artwork I create is on an artboard that is at lease 1920 X 1080 points (pixels)

               

              As for question 4, working in 3D and with cameras in AE the size of your composition is always the size of your output. The camera has nothing to do with it. You manipulate the camera much in the same way you would in any 3D app. The ACTIVE Camera view in the Composition Panel is the only view that will render. It's important to know that if you move the camera closer to a 3D layer than the zoom value of the camera's lens that you are effectively scaling the layer so anything that is not a vector layer will start to soften and degrade.

               

              There's lots to learn. It won't all fit in a post. Just learning the basics of AE could easily fill a couple of semesters at a university.

               

              Look at resources like Total Training, Lynda.com for paid training that is very well done and affordable. Look to sites like Video Copilot and Adobe TV for free resources. Be very aware that most of the training videos on YouTube are done by amateurs and many if not most of them contain poor workflows and inefficient techniques that can develop bad habits and produce poor results.

              • 4. Re: My character image imported from Illustrator in after effects becomes pixelated and blurry every time I click and drag on a body part of my character.
                tvekic Level 1

                wow.

                 

                 

                 

                Thank you so much!

                 

                I have a membership at Lynda.com and have gone through animation courses but it seems like I need to go all the way back to the basics....... They were right when they said Ae has a steep learning curve.

                 

                Thanks alot, I really appreciated your response!