12 Replies Latest reply on Jul 11, 2015 8:46 AM by trshaner

    Capturing Data from 35 mm slides

    peterd32855320

      I have scanned in about 3000 35mm slides from their original projector cassettes and recoded this in Lightroom.  Upon reviewing the contents of each casette, the slides have over the years become somewhat jumbled from their original position on the film. I would like a way to to record the slide number, month and year to allow for future sorting and viewing in chronoligical sequence.  I am sure there must be a template specific to this somewhere, given the standard data fields in lightroom presets dont appear to allow user defined fields to be added.  Any advice will be welcome.

       

      Peter

        • 1. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
          bob frost Level 3

          Just make the year-month-filenumber the first part of the filename. They will always sort in the correct order then under filename. That is what I do.

           

          Bob Frost

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
            peterd32855320 Level 1

            Thanks Bob, I have used the filename to record the Cassette no and slot number.  I am hoping to keep these so need a separate naming scheme for the film/frame no.  I may have to resort to your suggestion tho!  A metadata subschema for slides is really what I need, I think.

            • 3. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
              trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              If all of the scan files are already imported and named with Cassette #_Slot# inside LR I suggest leaving the file names alone. Use LR Keywords, Collections, Flags, and Ratings to catalog and organize the image files. There's really no need to use filename and foldename organization for this purpose when using LR.

               

              I suggest you also give thought to the subject and location metadata you want to use. Chronology alone isn't going to be helpful when looking for pictures of specific places, people, and things. Excellent book on the subject here:

               

              Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5 - The DAM Book

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                robgendreau Level 3

                I'd try as much as possible to make an analogy to modern digital images. The filename is the sequence. You add a suffix or prefix to memorialize a difference sequence upon that, as some of us do when exporting a custom order for say a slideshow, so that any user could arrange them in the order intended (date sometimes accomplishes that, but filename is more foolproof). The cassettes are like acts in a slideshow, I presume.

                 

                Dates and times already have fields in metadata, so that's easy, and it may be different than the filename sequence, if you use the filename sequence to preserve a custom order (again, like what occurs with a slideshow; I discovered on scanning mine I might intersperse portraits with other photos for purposes of the slideshow even though they had different times or dates). If you do this, and assign dates and times in the same sequence as the film position, you don't really need the latter info, since it is necessarily recorded in the date/time sequence (where it's more easily sorted, BTW; check the "Sort by...").

                 

                I once tried a keyword hierarchy for carousel>position but it didn't work well since I had to use it with an application that didn't recognize the hierarchy. The filenames worked better. And BTW there's an IPTC Extension field for "Source Type" you can use to designate slide scans. You might also adapt an IPTC field for use in designating some of this info, like maybe "category" since it's deprecated. But again, check on how easy it is to filter/search/sort on that; it might not be ideal, or as useful as other ways to enter the same info.

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                • 5. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                  peterd32855320 Level 1

                  Thank you for your advice, I am downloading the book as I write!

                  • 6. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                    peterd32855320 Level 1

                    thanks also for reminding me to move away from the structure of files and folders (which, despite 38 yrs in IT,  I still reckon is the best way to be confident of finding "stuff").  Metadata is okay so long as the "right " information can be stored, filtered and searched on.  I haven't always found this to be the case. I will utilise other fields as suggested.  I will have to modify the date/time fields as the old slides only have a month and year printed on them (in most cases) -  no date or time -  we are spoiled with digital!  These are mostly family snaps so the timeline is important when reviewing the progression of the children when growing up, however a few keywords on each slide will help with this.  Now that I am retired I will have time to do this!

                    • 7. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                      robgendreau Level 3

                      BTW, allow me to plug J Friedl's plugin "People Support." It has some nice features for people tagging. One is adding birthdate, so once you get a year associated with the picture you can view the photo with the ages of the people therein displayed. Pretty neat. Jeffrey Friedl's Blog » Jeffrey’s “People Support” Lightroom Plugin

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                      • 8. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                        peterd32855320 Level 1

                        Thanks again, I will take a look at this.

                        • 9. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                          Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          peterd32855320 wrote:

                           

                          I will have to modify the date/time fields as the old slides only have a month and year printed on them (in most cases) -  no date or time -  we are spoiled with digital!  These are mostly family snaps so the timeline is important

                          Although Lightroom has an Edit Capture Time command, it's really for digital camera images and doesn't work so well with scans. Lightroom and other programs will probably list the scans under the date they were scanned, not the date they were actually taken. If you want to set the date of a scan to the date the image was actually taken on film, you can use the Capture Time to EXIF plug-in.

                           

                          Capture Time to Exif web page

                           

                          Among other things, Capture Time to EXIF can...

                          ...update the Date Time Original EXIF field of scanned images. Lightroom's filter panel and smart collections can then find the images by searching for when the pictures were originally taken rather than when they were digitised.

                          1 person found this helpful
                          • 10. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                            peterd32855320 Level 1

                            More great advice thank you

                            • 11. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                              trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                              One other suggestion is to record the film type to an EXIF field or as a keyword. This  is especially helpful if you shot with more than one film type. Kodachrome requires it's own unique color correction unless your scanner software has a Kodachrome preset that was used during the scan process.

                               

                              I coauthored an article with Mark Segal on Luminous Landscape that may be of interest:

                               

                              https://luminous-landscape.com/scannerless-digital-capture-and-processing-of-negative-film -photographs/

                               

                              There's a PDF with full details that can be downloaded at the above link. I've used this scannerless process to capture both color negative and slide film images for processing in PS and LR. Mark Segal uses Silverfast and LR in his processing workflow.

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                              • 12. Re: Capturing Data from 35 mm slides
                                trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                peterd32855320 wrote:

                                thanks also for reminding me to move away from the structure of files and folders (which, despite 38 yrs in IT,  I still reckon is the best way to be confident of finding "stuff").  Metadata is okay so long as the "right " information can be stored, filtered and searched on.  I haven't always found this to be the case.

                                I think you will find LR's tools far more efficient than using file naming and folders for organization purposes. The other issue with file naming and folder hierarchy organization is that every time you rename or move a file it opens the door for file corruption on disk or simply "dragging & dropping" into the wrong folder. We see it all the time in the LR forum, " LR deleted my Files," LR corrupted my Files," "Where are my files."

                                 

                                What you can do to make your metadata available outside LR is to manually apply 'Save Metadata to File' (CTRL + S). I don't recommend enabling 'Automatically write changes into XMP' since this can cause performance issues inside LR and requires your backup synchronization software to resave the files every time you make a metadata change. Do this once after you've completed adding metadata, keywording, rating, etc. to a group of images. Select all of the updated images and then apply Metadata > 'Save Metadata to File' (CTRL + S).