5 Replies Latest reply on Jul 11, 2015 10:59 AM by ManiacJoe

    What PPI setting?

    Daskew78 Level 1

      Hi,

       

      I've specifically purchased lightroom like all to achieve the best results for getting into photography.

       

      I am at a stumbling block though when it comes to the PPI setting when printing out. I have a 4K camera which is mounted on to a drone, the specs are as follows (it's not all relevant im sure but copying and pasting so why not):

      Name: X3

      Model: FC350

      Total Pixels: 12.76M

      Effective Pixels : 12.4M

      Image Max Size: 4000x3000

       

      The printer I have is a Canon PIXMA iP8750 and the resolution it can print is up to 9600 x 2400 dpi.

       

      My question is simply what is the maximum setting I should set the PPI to so I can achieve the best digital print?

       

      Canon say I should ask Adobe as it's their software, adobe can't tell me as say I should ask Canon and I get differences of opinion when asking or researching online.

       

      Thanks in advance.

        • 2. Re: What PPI setting?
          Daskew78 Level 1

          Hi,

           

          Thank you for your reply.

           

          If I have read that correct and understood it, the PPI needs to be less for smaller prints than it does for larger prints.

           

          That being said I do not want to lower it below a certain amount that the quality of the image is reduced.


          So is there a recommended setting for different sized prints that would allow me to ensure I have the best quality result?

           

          I need to look for PPI settings for the following sized paper:

          A3+, A3, A4, LTR, LDR, 25x30cm, 20x25cm, 13x18cm, 10x15cm

           

          Thank you.

          • 3. Re: What PPI setting?
            ManiacJoe Adobe Community Professional

            The DPI/PPI field in the image files is not all the useful of a field.

            Most devices, like your TV and monitor and mobile devices, are a fixed PPI device so they ignore the DPI/PPI field in the image.

             

            Your printer is a variable DPI/PPI device and can honor the field, but is best when it ignores it.

             

            After you crop your image, it has a size A x B pixels; you want to print it on paper at a certain size  C x D inches. You can do the math (pixels per inch) and fill in the field for the printer, or you can just tell the printer to make the image fit your paper size and let the printer do the math.

             

            It is handy to know what PPI you are printing at due to the fact that if you go too low, say below 150 PPI, you will start to see the print quality drop off.

            • 4. Re: What PPI setting?
              Daskew78 Level 1

              Ahh that seems a better option...

               

              I'm taking my pictures in 4K resolution and the maximum I am printing onto is A3+, therefore there should be enough data for a high resolution image on that size?

               

              If so... I should ensure my pictures are taken in the correct aspect ratio so i do not need to "zoom to fit" (or put up with borders top and bottom), then leave the PPI unticked and I will get the best results my printer can print that image?

              • 5. Re: What PPI setting?
                ManiacJoe Adobe Community Professional

                I will let you do the math on the PPI as I am not that familiar with the EU paper sizes. 150 PPI (pixels per inch) is about 60 pixels per centimeter. When you drop below that level (small picture on big paper), you need to do some test prints to see if the print quality is going to work or not. Sometimes yes, sometimes no.

                 

                When your picture ratio does not match your paper ratio, you need to decide if you want white margins or if you want a cropped image.

                DSLR cameras naturally shoot a 2:3 ratio, which prints perfectly on a 4x6 or 8x12 paper. I normally crop my images to a 5:7 ratio so that a conversion to a 4x6 is a simple small trim along the long edges which almost never affects my images.