10 Replies Latest reply on Jul 17, 2015 11:58 AM by mario.milosevic

    Which version of InD should I buy?

    mario.milosevic Level 1

      I am a licensed owner of InDesign CS3. It has been working for us for close to 10 years and we're very happy with it. It does what we want. But now we've started working with other designers and they have CS6 or CC. We can't open those files with CS3. So my question to this forum is what should we buy? CS6 or CC. We are not rich. The cheaper option for us would be best.

       

      Also, how does InDesign work with Mac Mini? We will have to buy a new computer to run the more recent versions of InDesign. Mac Mini comes in three levels. Is the lowest level sufficient to run the newer InDesigns? It only has 2GB of ROM and Adobe recommends 8GB. Is that a crippling restriction? The middle level Mini has 8GB, but it is also $200 dollars more.

       

      Thanks for your help.

        • 1. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
          BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

          CC is, IMO, cheaper in the long run. Even to buy InDesign CS6 will cost you $700 and you will already be 3 version out of date and unable to open CC files

           

           

           

          CC is continually updated and for just InDesign will cost you $20/month with an annual contract.

          • 2. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
            Derek Cross Level 6

            You can subscribe to all the latest versions of InDesign – CS6, CC2014 and CC2015 – (UK prices) at £17.15 a month, or the whole creative suite, which includes InDesign, Photoshop, illustrator and a lot more for £45.73 a month.

            • 3. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              I guess it depends on your definition of "long run."

               

              Over time a CS6 license will cost less, and will work forever as long as the hardware and OS support it, but just like CS3 it's a dead end for you in a collaborative workflow.  The cost of a subscription is overall about the same as buying the upgrades when they were released in the past (which you did not do), but you spread that cost over easier to budget monthly payments, and you always have access to the latest version if your equipment will run it. The downside is that when you stop paying the software stops working.

              • 4. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                jmvrankin Adobe Community Professional

                Going by Bob's numbers, you'd have to use CS6 for 3 years to break even. Until that point, CC is cheaper. After that, CS6 is cheaper—if it's still supported and running.


                Also: What is the nature of your work with the designers using CS6 and CC? Print only or digital publishing? If files are going back and forth, or if you'll want to make ebooks at some point, it will be better if you're up to date and using the same version. If it's a one-way street and they're just sending you files that you finish and output for print, you can use CS6—as long as the files don't use any of the CC features. The person using CC would have to export an IDML version of the file to send to you (plus the linked assets), which you can open with CS4 or later. Consult James Wamer's excellent guide to the features in every InDesign version for more info. bit.ly/InDesignNewFeaturesGuide

                • 5. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                  BobLevine MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                  The OP is already getting CC files to work on, Mike.

                   

                   

                   

                  I suspect that at some point very soon a new O/S is going to kill CS6 anyway.

                  • 6. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                    mario.milosevic Level 1

                    We're doing print and ebooks. We are using outside designers only for the covers. We do the interiors of the books ourselves. CS3 is more than sufficient for the interiors. The layouts are pretty simple, so we don't need anything fancy. The problem is the covers. I can use CS3 to make my own covers, but that was getting too time consuming, so we have started farming out our covers. That's when the problems started. We couldn't open any of the covers designers did for us. So now we're looking at upgrading. Thanks to everyone for their input. It does seem like CC is the best way to go.

                     

                    Still would like some insight from Mac Mini users. Is the cheapest Mac Mini sufficient to run InDesign CC? We would like to save $200 by buying the cheaper Mini, but if it isn't efficient at running ID CC, then we'll bite the bullet and get the next level of Mini. So anyone have experience with ID and Mac Mini?

                     

                    Another question I have: most cover designers don't use InDesign. They use Photoshop. Can InDesign CC open photoshop files?

                     

                    Thanks to everyone for all your help.

                    • 7. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                      Derek Cross Level 6

                      You can Place Photoshop files in InDesign documents. And you can round-trip the images back and forth from InDesign to Photoshop if you want to make changes.


                      Depending what you mean by "eBooks", if you want to produce good Reflowable text ePubs and Fixed Layout ePubs you really need to use the latest  version of InDesign which is CC2015.

                      • 8. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                        mario.milosevic Level 1

                        I didn't know InDesign makes epubs. That's cool. Does it also mke mobi files? If it doesn't, then I'm not sure it helps me. I use Jutoh, a $40 piece of software that makes epubs and mobi files at the same time.

                        • 9. Re: Which version of InD should I buy?
                          Derek Cross Level 6

                          InDesign doesn't create mobi files directly. The workflow is to create the ePub then convert it using the Kindle Previewer.