3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 27, 2015 12:53 PM by rob day

    Using a color profile to convert colors to lower ink density

    victorandres64

      We have a multi-document book that we are exporting from indesign to our printer. The printing company requires us to submit individual CMYK PDFs which have a max ink density of 280, but most images and all text contain the full 300% ink density. I believe in the past I was able to make a color profile in photoshop that contained the information to automatically convert the blacks as well as the colors to lower the ink density of my export from indesign. I have spent a lot of time trying all the different settings in indesign and acrobat to try to get the full PDF converted, but I can't seem to be able to get the conversion to work at all. It seems like what we really need is a way to easily convert all the colors during the indesign export to match the printer requirements. As I am selecting my custom profile in the output tab, this should already be happening, but output preview in acrobat shows the same high ink densities. Any ideas?

       

      thanks

        • 1. Re: Using a color profile to convert colors to lower ink density
          rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          The ink is limited during a conversion to CMYK, so once the conversion happens simply assigning a new CMYK profile won't change values. Ideally you want to use the correct profile as your assigned document profile and to make any conversions to CMYK. If the printer expects you to make CMYK conversions, they should provide the correct profile. This is why in most cases it's better to place RGB because the conversion to the correct profile can happen on export

          • 2. Re: Using a color profile to convert colors to lower ink density
            victorandres64 Level 1

            I see! Yes everything in the indesign file was already in CMYK, which would explain why conversion didn't work. The profile in Indesign actually did preview the correct final colors, but the output/conversion did not work.

             

            Unfortunately, it seems like my only choice with our current set up was to convert all the images in the file manually as well as create my own black swatch which I could customize (this seems to be a standard practice anyway). I also noticed that I could have loaded up all of the individual exports into photoshop to convert them after the fact, but this would definitely be a bad workflow, as it would require each page's proof to be re-converted every time it had to be updated in indesign.

             

            Is it typical to design to print in RGB colors then convert to the printer CMYK profile on export? It guess just seems counter-intuitive to me to design in a color space that is an 'opposite' of the final product. We use a lot of photography, and our main concern would be losing the color accuracy of those images or of our advertiser's artwork.

             

            thanks

            • 3. Re: Using a color profile to convert colors to lower ink density
              rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Is it typical to design to print in RGB colors then convert to the printer CMYK profile on export?

              The image files originate as RGB somewhere (camera or scanner) right? Adobe's applications all use the same color management. You would get the same output values on a conversion to CMYK in Photoshop, on export, or at print (assuming the profiles, color intent, and black point compensation are the same). So your problem is typical when the commitment to a CMYK space is made early (in Photoshop). If you place RGB you can change your mind about the destination profile and make the correct CMYK conversion when you export.

               

              Is the book printing on uncoated paper? Most coated profiles are 300+