8 Replies Latest reply on Aug 29, 2015 1:57 AM by Popcorn Media man

    Premiere Elements Encoding help

    Popcorn Media man

      Hi There

       

      So - it's taken me 7 hrs so far to encode a DVD that is just under 2 hrs long - system is iMac 3.4 Ghz Intel i5 with 8Gb Ram and nearly full SSD. All my media is stored externally on a drive via USB - is that why its so slow??

       

      The content is 2 mixed camera and a 3rd track with some Pro Res content in. It's possible for me to change everything and upgrade RAM etc, but my system is only showing 4.5 Gb used by Premiere.

       

      Please help.......

       

      Thanks

       

      Andy

        • 1. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
          A.T. Romano Level 7

          Popcorn Media man

           

          I am strictly an Elements Windows user but I try to find common ground between Premiere Elements Windows and Mac on issues such as these.

           

          What are you doing - burn to DVD-VIDEO standard or widescreen on DVD disc or burn to AVCHD on DVD disc? Data transfer rate of an external drive where source media is stored could be a factor. Is it possible for you to create a new project, store the media for that project on the computer, and then do the burn to DVD? If so, did it make a difference in the burn time?

           

          Just in case mention...burn time is going to be influenced by the complexity of the Timeline and computer resources. Have you applied video stabilization to any of the Timeline content? What is the speed rating for your burner and disc?

           

          Let us start here and then consider what next based on the details in your reply.

           

          Thank you.

           

          ATR

          • 2. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
            Popcorn Media man Level 1

            Hi there

             

            OK, so after 8 hrs it started to burn the dvd, got to 98% and stopped!!

             

            So, I am currently saving the file as an ISO on the machines disc, and it does seem a little quicker. I also changed the Cache location to the machine, so any of the 3 above might be the answer! -

             

            Also, as there are sections on the timeline that are at 0% opacity, will the machine process that info and should i delete those sections before encoding? (They might be useful of course in a re-edit)

             

            System resources just say its using 400% of the CPU!!

             

            Ho hum…

             

            To answer your question, its burning to DVD Widescreen and then rather to DVD its saving as an ISO file (I hope!!)

             

            Yet to work out how to then burn as a DVD!!

             

            Thanks

             

            Andy Johnson-Smith

             

            andy@popcornmedia.co.uk

             

             

             

            www.popcornmedia.co.uk

            • 3. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
              A.T. Romano Level 7

              Andy

               

              For troubleshooting purposes, can you get the burn to folder as well as the burn to ISO Image to work for you to produce the VIDEO_TS Folder and the .iso file respectively? At this time, have you actually gotten a successful burn to ISO Image that you found at the save location that you designated for it? A frequent issue has been getting message of successful burn to and then not finding the end product in the designated Save In location.

               

              In the burn dialog, with your disc in the burner tray, what is the burn dialog's Quality area showing for Space Required and Bitrate?

              Did you ever say your burner and disc speed rating? What disc are you using DVD 4.7 GB/120 minutes or DVD 8.5 GB/240 minutes?

               

              I would leave as is the areas of the Timeline that were taken to 0% Opacity to create an effect.

               

              Do you have menus and Timeline markers in this project? If so, any stop markers? If so, remove any stop marker that you may have at the end of the last item on the Timeline. The stop marker is not needed at that position and causes burn to failures.

               

              Please consider.

               

              ATR

              • 4. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                Popcorn Media man Level 1

                Thanks for the quick reply..

                 

                I haven’t yet had anything useable - the DVD started to burn and then just stopped at 98% - The DVD (A dual layer) has some content on, but nothing that is recognised by a player (Unsupported)

                 

                I’m still waiting for the current ISO version!

                 

                There are timeline markers and a stop at the end - I’ll try removing that one when it gets to the end (If it does)

                 

                I have changed from using iMovie really for the DVD bits of the software, but fear i might have to invest in DVD burning software with a nice menu design element - then i can burn as Mpeg2 in either Premiere or iMovie as well as After Effects, which is my main working software.

                 

                Hope this helps with the diagnostics…

                 

                Andy Johnson-Smith

                 

                andy@popcornmedia.co.uk

                 

                 

                 

                www.popcornmedia.co.uk

                • 5. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                  A.T. Romano Level 7

                  Andy

                   

                  Based on history, that stop marker removal at the end of the last item on the Timeline should be the fix (if history repeats itself).

                  In Windows, the user usually gets a "vobulator" error associated with this situation.

                   

                  Hoping that is the case. It may not do anything for the burn times, but it should get you a successful burn to disc.

                   

                  ATR

                  • 6. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                    Popcorn Media man Level 1

                    Hi there

                     

                    So, I changed the scratch locations for cache and encoding to the machine and burned to an ISO file - copied that file to a DVD (DL) and it all went OK, much quicker (4hrs) but, the DVD won't play on players. I read that the DVD doesn't need the whole ISO file, just the TS files, so need to try that option out.

                     

                    The other issue i now have is the menu doesn't look right when i can open the TS file - but need to get the players to read it properly before i attempt to find a remedy.

                     

                    My other concern is this.....

                     

                    I am using AVCHD files so the size of the project is 1080 AVCHD format, which is fine, however, most of the footage i use is only a percentage of the image, so often the footage is scaled up to 140% - which in theory is fine as the resolution of the DVD is much lower than this - but, this means the images become pixelated at 1080p and that pixelation is translated to the final DVD, meaning i cant use the scaled versions. I have found that by creating a new file and then if i create a text using a preset for PAL DVD Widescreen, and then add the AVCHD footage the project stays in PAL format as long as the text is the first thing on the timeline, which is OK as I can always create a company logo to be placed there, but i then find the system has a really hard time editing the AVCHD files.Am i better changing them to a MPEG or MOV format?

                     

                    All insight is useful!!

                     

                    Thanks

                    • 7. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                      A.T. Romano Level 7

                      Andy

                       

                      About your understanding of burn to Folder (4.7 GB) and Folder 8.5 GB) versus burn to ISO Image (4.7 GB) and ISO Image (8.5 GB).

                       

                      For DVD-VIDEO, the burn to folder gives you a saved folder with two folders in it  - OpenDVD and VIDEO_TS. It is only the VIDEO_TS Folder that you take to DVD disc using a free program such as ImgBurn (if you are on Windows)...if Mac, I think that there is a utility for that.

                      For DVD-VIDEO, the burn to ISO Image gives you a .iso file that you take to DVD disc with another program...no sure what the Mac user would use for that. In either case, the VIDEO_TS Folder or the .iso file represents a copy of the project including menus if you have applied menus to the project.

                       

                      You wrote

                      I read that the DVD doesn't need the whole ISO file, just the TS files

                      Not sure where you are going with that. Each is a different representation of the whole project. I am not seeing "DVD doesn't need the whole ISO".

                       

                      And, be careful with your use of Premiere Elements 13/13.1 and .iso files that will end up on DVD discs. If the file size of the .iso is over about 1.1 GB, the disc with this .iso file is not recognized by the player. See

                      ATR Premiere Elements Troubleshooting: PE 13: ISO Image File Size Issue

                      In the past, this factor has applied more to AVCHD ISO Image and Blu-ray ISO Image more so that DVD-VIDEO ISO Image.

                       

                      As for your menu, the project preset determines which menu set you will have available to you in the Movie Menu area. So, please supply

                      project preset

                      specific Movie Menu you selected

                      specific ways that the theme did not look right - where did it not look right, in the Movie Menu Preview?

                       

                      For part 3 of 3 of your post 6.

                       

                      To be continued...

                       

                      ATR

                      • 8. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                        A.T. Romano Level 7

                        Andy

                         

                        Regarding

                        I am using AVCHD files so the size of the project is 1080 AVCHD format, which is fine, however, most of the footage i use is only a percentage of the image, so often the footage is scaled up to 140% - which in theory is fine as the resolution of the DVD is much lower than this - but, this means the images become pixelated at 1080p and that pixelation is translated to the final DVD, meaning i cant use the scaled versions. I have found that by creating a new file and then if i create a text using a preset for PAL DVD Widescreen, and then add the AVCHD footage the project stays in PAL format as long as the text is the first thing on the timeline, which is OK as I can always create a company logo to be placed there, but i then find the system has a really hard time editing the AVCHD files.Am i better changing them to a MPEG or MOV format?

                        Can I assume that your source video media are 1920 x 1080 @ 25 progressive frames per second. If so, is your project preset = PAL DSLR 1080p DSLR 1080p25? What are the pixel dimensions of the stills going into this project and how many of them are there? If over 1920 x 1080 16:9 they can be resized to 1920 x 1080 16:9 or left as is 16:9 scaled if the computer resources allow. Taking that 1920 x 1080 Timeline to Publish+Share/Disc/DVD disc with preset PAL_Widescreen_Dolby DVD  should give you good results. I am not seeing where the 140% scaling is coming into that. I suspect that I am overlooking something in your workflow.

                         

                        Please explore....

                         

                        The project offers only one project preset, and it should match the properties of the source media. When there are videos and stills involved in the project, then I would favor the video properties in setting up the project. And, then size or let the stills be sized to the project settings. Consequently, if you had, 1920 x 1080 @ 25 progressive frames per second videos and 1920 x 1080 16:9 photos, why are you not just taking them to Publish+Share/Disc/DVD disc PAL_Widescreen_Dolby Digital.

                         

                        Another consideration might be that you are working with a resource demanding format AVCHD, but the real issue may be too many photos grossly oversized for the project. If this is the case, I would rather crop resize or resize the photos before converting the AVCHD into another forum. In the old days of Premiere Elements 8.0/8.0.1, converting AVCHD to MPEG2 was a good workaround for those 32 bit application. But, now you are dealing with 64 bit application on a 64 bit operating system.

                         

                        Please review and consider, and then let me know if I have interpreted your workflow correctly.

                         

                        Thank you.

                         

                        ATR

                        • 9. Re: Premiere Elements Encoding help
                          Popcorn Media man Level 1

                          Hi ATR

                           

                          Thanks again for your responses, here is what i am aiming to do, rather than what the system is doing currently.

                           

                          I am filming in HD using 2 Canon XA20 cameras (One static & one movement). The resulting files (Currently AVCHD but can do other formats) is then imported into Premiere, which spirits the file into chunks of content (Around 15/20 mins each) As the content is 1920 X 1080 the idea is to only use up to 25%(ish) of the image as the resulting PAL DVD size is 720 X 576. This (In Theory) allows me to zoom into areas of HD image without pixilation - however, if i do this in a project that is HD (as the current one is) then in order to zoom in the scale has to be up to 140% resulting in pixelisation that is then compressed onto the final DVD. If i were able to edit straight in 720X576 then the scale would be less than 100% for full screen images so no pixilation, does that make sense?

                           

                          I am new to Premiere so the setting i am using can be altered to suit, so my question is really more to do with what the best format is for editing, as i am able to use Quicktime to change the format to MPEG2 or MOV or whatever it needs to be to help Premiere, but in order to zoom in it really needs to be 1920 X 1080 - when i export through Quicktime the resulting file is 1920 X 1080 at 50FPS in MPEG format but isnt responsive in Premiere when it goes into a PAL DVD project.

                           

                          The current footage is 1920 X 1080 at 50FPS - possibly to remove image flicker as projectors on the event were causing issue, although i think that might be a shutter thing. (Spot the novice!!)

                           

                          Does that help understand my intended workflow - is there a better (NTSC) DVD setting to work in?

                           

                          Thanks a million