9 Replies Latest reply on Jan 26, 2016 5:21 AM by RjL190365

    My budget is 500 dollars max.

    grobert93

      I am a college student who is looking for a laptop that can run AAE (and PP + PS) well enough for casual use. I will use college labs for high end video editing, but wanted a portable laptop to carry around for minor edits and casual use. I have been recommended at least 8gb of ram and a i5 processor, but most of these run 500 dollars or more. I am willing to get refurbished. I am uncertain what specs I can get away with for casual use, while not blowing 500+ dollars.

        • 1. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
          Dave LaRonde Level 6

          Find a refurbished machine that runs either Win 7 or Mavericks, trick that baby out with RAM (very important!) and you ought to be good to go.

          • 2. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            I hope you know that it is necessary to run off AC power to successfully edit on a laptop.  On battery power all laptop vendors throttle back the CPU and GPU making editing impractical.

            • 3. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
              cc_merchant Level 4

              Assuming you want to edit more than standard definition DV material, you need at least a 4-core Intel, preferably with HT, at least 16 GB memory, and a full HD screen, running off a SSD and an external USB3 Samsung T1 SSD for media. If you double the budget you may be lucky to find a refurbished one with these specs, otherwise you need to save some more. Also invest in a power cable, since the battery is not usable.

              • 4. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                RjL190365 Level 4

                The specs suggested to you are, unfortunately, below Adobe's practical recommended specs for editing HD source material. This is because there is absolutely no mobile i5 CPU at all whatsoever that has more than two physical CPU cores. In fact, all mobile i5 CPUs are simply mobile i3 CPUs that have turbo boost (Intel's auto-overclocking feature) enabled (normal i3's have this feature disabled at manufacturing level).

                 

                In addition, if you were buying new (or even refurbished), you may not be able to find a laptop with a screen resolution that's higher than 1366 x 768 at your maximum budget. And Adobe requires a minimum screen resolution of 1280 x 800 (and the screen must meet or exceed the minimums in both dimensions, not just the total number of pixels). Unfortunately, 1366 x 768 does not meet Adobe's minimum display resolution requirements because the vertical resolution is too low.

                 

                And even if you can find a refurbished laptop that has a 1600 x 900 or 1920 x 1080 display at your price point, such laptops will likely be equipped with CPUs and GPUs that are more than two generations old - which will leave you back to square one.

                • 5. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                  Chase Chick Level 1

                  I've got a laptop I'll sell you. I've been running premiere and photoshop and ae on it. It's got an i3, 8 gigs of ram, and a 500gb Samsung ssd. Now, it isn't the fastest kid on the block with heavy scenes, and rendering anything is near useless, but for simple casual stuff it's great.

                   

                  I'll sell it for $400. The model is Asus u45jc. I've upgraded the ram and hdd.

                   

                  Email me at chase.chick@gmail.com if you're interested and we'll do PayPal or something. Probably add $20 or so for the shipping.

                  • 6. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                    RjL190365 Level 4

                    Chase Chick wrote:

                     

                    I've got a laptop I'll sell you. I've been running premiere and photoshop and ae on it. It's got an i3, 8 gigs of ram, and a 500gb Samsung ssd. Now, it isn't the fastest kid on the block with heavy scenes, and rendering anything is near useless, but for simple casual stuff it's great.

                    Unfortunately, it's still saddled by a below-minimum-required vertical screen resolution (1366 x 768 - it's the 768 that falls below Adobe's minimum resolution requirements, which call for a 1280 x 800 or higher resolution display). Beginning with Premiere Pro CC 201x (where x=4 or 5 or higher), the program will display a warning (or error) message complaining that the display resolution is too low for Premiere to run correctly. The program will still run, but critical portions of the interface will be missing and unrecoverable until a higher-resolution monitor is connected to the PC.

                    • 7. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                      grobert93 Level 1

                      Even the refurbished machines are well over 500 dollars, especially the apple computers.

                       

                      The only way I would be willing to spend over 500 dollars is if I can do monthly payments.

                      • 8. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                        grobert93 Level 1

                        I'd be willing to sacrifice the screen resolution space for a cheaper laptop while I do most work in labs. If I get intro the professional world, I'll get a nice qualified computer.

                        • 9. Re: My budget is 500 dollars max.
                          RjL190365 Level 4

                          Going back to the original question:

                           

                          Yesterday I picked myself up a factory reconditioned Toshiba E45-B4200 laptop for about $400. It is equipped with a Haswell i5-4210U dual-core CPU, 6GB of RAM, a 750GB 5400-rpm HDD, integrated Intel HD 4400 graphics, a 14" 1920 x 1080 LED-backlit display and Windows 8.1 (which I had upgraded to Windows 10). As expected, it is nearly 28 times slower than the desktop with the best RPI on the PPBM7 site even though I used a fast USB 3.0 flash drive. The export time from PPBM9's MPEG-2 DVD timeline wasn't too bad for a system that had been forced to run in MPE software-only mode (419 seconds, which was certainly faster than my main desktop rig could achieve with MPE off). But its export result from the H.264 Blu-ray timeline was downright "louse-tacular" (read: spectacularly lousy) at 1,187 seconds because of the lack of hardware MPE acceleration (though only slightly slower than the 1,000-plus second result of my main desktop system with MPE turned off).

                           

                          Thus, you might be able to get away with getting such a cheap $500 laptop if you're going to be editing source material that's no higher than 1080p and export it to a lower-resolution distribution format. But exporting to high-rez H.264 or H.265 would almost completely overwhelm such a system.

                           

                          Hope this helps,

                           

                          Randall

                           

                          EDIT 1/26: The above result was deceptively fast (low-numbered times) due to the laptop having only 6GB of RAM, which forced Premiere to run its renderer in a default mode with the integrated graphics that apparently includes some hardware GPU acceleration (even though the renderer stated "Mercury Playback Engine Software Only"). As a result, the PPBM9 results with this configuration is meaningless and misleading. I found this out when I upgraded the RAM from 6GB to 8GB simply by replacing the laptop's existing 2GB DIMM with a 4GB DIMM. The upgrade to 8GB of RAM actually enabled the "Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration (OpenCL)" mode, which Premiere selected by default. In this mode PPBM9 actually returned results of 357 seconds with MPE on and more than 2,200 seconds with MPE off from the MPEG-2 DVD timeline. The H.264 Blu-ray export took nearly 1,200 seconds with MPE on (I didn't test it with MPE off). Those results are comparable to what I would probably see from a GeForce GT 720 or GT 730 with 64-bit DDR3 graphics RAM.

                           

                          In other words, the iGPU is lousy. Really lousy. At least for Premiere.