4 Replies Latest reply on Oct 5, 2015 7:34 AM by danielb4195942

    Problems with generating peak file for captured videos.avi @ 99% and then crash

    danielb4195942

      Hi,

       

      I am currently working on a project to make my Australian trip 2014 into a DVD, using Adobe Premiere Elements 13.

       

      I have moved on to cutting the footage on the second out of five or six tapes. Now, the footage was recorded onto a JVC Mini DV cassette, shot on LP which means it's 90 mins long, not 60 mins. The video was shot using my Panasonic camcorder.

       

      Now, the problem I had was that the original tape broke during filming. By that, I mean that I recorded about 29 mins worth of footage, before the tape just stopped in the camera - the tape did not come off the spool, and was not even scrunched up or anything it just stopped. Maybe, this was caused by the hot and humid conditions in Australia at the time of filming, or more likely the stress on an old tape of me, pausing and then starting filming.

       

      Now, the good news is that I managed to film after the break in the tape happened, and I thought I'd lost the footage, but fortunately, when I got back to the UK, I contacted an online company named DVDedit.co.uk, who managed to resurrect the lost footage, and burn it onto x1 DVD and x1 data disc.

       

      The problem I'm having right now is: I'm editing using footage captured onto my PC from the damaged tape. Just below the timeline on Adobe Premiere Elements 13, it reads: Generating peak file for captured videos, and the blue bar shows the buffering status. This works fine, for 15-20 mins or so, but when the buffering gets to 99% the footage carries on, but the sound is muted. So, I do a shutdown, or close of Adobe Premiere Elements 13 - the footage is saved. But, each time, I go back in, the same thing happens: buffering gets to 99% and then crashes. So, I'm cutting it down as I go along, and it doing it in stages - which seems to help.

       

      But, is this problem caused by the nature of the original damaged footage itself? - (in some cases, my footage will freeze on the tape just for a second, and then, carry on as normal). Or: is it a new problem with the software, which will continue, even after I've finished using the damaged tape footage, and go on to footage captured from other, undamaged, normal tapes?

       

      I hope I'm making sense here. I'm trying to be as specific as I can. If anybody out there knows what I'm talking about, or has had a similar problem, and knows how to fix it, I would be very grateful for any help.

       

      Thank you.

       

      Regards

       

      Daniel Bowes

        • 1. Re: Problems with generating peak file for captured videos.avi @ 99% and then crash
          A.T. Romano Level 7

          Danie Bowes

           

          The good news seems to be that you have found a way to detour around some recording and workflow issues to get at your project goals.

           

          Thank you for the details of your situation. I would ask the following....

           

          a. You say

          Now, the footage was recorded onto a JVC Mini DV cassette, shot on LP which means it's 90 mins long, not 60 mins. The video was shot using my Panasonic camcorder.

          Does that mean that you recorded the DV data with a Panasonic mini DV camcorder using a miniDV cassette (brand JVC) so that you ended up with DV.AVI on the tape? If I am correct so far, what did you have DV AVI Type 1 or Type 2? If you do not know, put the DV AVI file through the free GSpot codec utility program and look at the details in the Container portion of the readout. GSpot Codec Information Appliance

           

          But, the basic question is what do you have on that DVD disc (data disc) whose files  you took into Premiere Elements 13/13.1? DV AVI Type 1 or Type 2 or  something else.

           

          The generating peaks error message suggests to me that the program is trying to conform the audio of the file. And, I am wondering if the use of DV AVI Type 1 is causing this issue. Premiere Elements supports DV AVI Type 2, not Type 1.

           

          Please consider and determine if any of the above applies to your situation.

           

          Thank you.

           

          ATR

          • 2. Re: Problems with generating peak file for captured videos.avi @ 99% and then crash
            danielb4195942 Level 1

            Hello ATR,

             

            The footage is on 2 VCL files. The 1st file has an audio bit rate of: 1024 kbps. Channels; 2 (stereo) and audio sample rate: 32 kHz. The 2nd VCL file has: audio bit rate: 224 kbps. Channels: 2 (stereo) and audio sample rate: 48 kHz.

             

            I hope this helps. If you need any more information, let me know, and I would be happy to provide it for you.

             

            Regards,

             

            Daniel Bowes

            • 3. Re: Problems with generating peak file for captured videos.avi @ 99% and then crash
              A.T. Romano Level 7

              Daniel Bowes

               

              Thanks for the reply with additional information.

               

              Although you seem have started with DV data capture, what is immediate before us are files professionally recover from the tapes and saved to DVD disc (data disc).

               

              In the latest post you mention these files are VLC files and give audio properties. How did VLC get into the matter? Are you just getting video audio properties from the VLC player or have you used it to convert your video audio to another format?

               

              What is the project preset for your Premiere Elements project? The project preset is typically described to include an audio Sample Rate of 48 kHz (48000 samples per second). When you import a file into Project Assets, the program automatically conforms the audio to that of the project settings. Something to explore...

              1. Open a new project and import the videoaudio with the Sample Rate of 32 kHz (32000 samples per second), and look for for the peaking message and crashes.

              2. Open a new project and import the videoaudio with the Sample Rate of 48 kHZ (48000 samples per second), and look for the peaking message and crashes.

              Is the result different 1 vs 2?

               

              Do you know the video compression, audio compression, file extension, interlaced or progressive, file extension, pixel aspect ratio of the file that you are importing into the Premiere Elements project?

               

              To be continued...

               

              ATR

              • 4. Re: Problems with generating peak file for captured videos.avi @ 99% and then crash
                danielb4195942 Level 1

                Dear ATR,

                 

                Sorry for the long delay in getting back to you about this topic. Thank you for your long and very informative response from last time. Here is where I am right now:

                 

                You will recall that I was having problems with generating peak files through Premiere Elements 13, it got to 99% and then crashed. The video file which caused this came from a JVC mini DV tape, recorded at 90 mins LP - this tape broke 28 mins into filming. I still managed to import the footage onto my PC. The other half of the footage (after the break) was salvaged by DVDedit.co.uk, and they sent it back to my as both a video data disc, as an MPEG2 file - which I've found out, doesn't work with Premiere Elements 13. The second disc was a DVD, containing the restored footage. Here's what I managed to do.

                 

                1. I managed to copy the footage from the DVD direct into Premiere Elements 13. I was able to cut the footage I wanted with no problems, and then jettison the rest. That part worked great.
                2. I then made a New Project in Premiere Elements 13, where I recut the first damaged footage file - 28 mins down into just under 7 mins. That was OK. But again, I have problems saving the file onto computer or disc, because the Encoding Process stays at 0%  for what seems like an eternity.
                3. I then tried to copy the original 28 mins damaged video file onto a USB stick or a RW DVD, but no luck because the file is too big. I even tried saving it into a compressed zip file, but again, no luck because it's too large. Just to refresh your memory, the size of the first damaged file is: 5.80 GB.
                4. So, I've thought about contacting the original guy at www.dvdedit.co.uk to explain what my problem is, and see if he can help in some way. But, I can't get the file to him because it won't save onto USB or RW DVD, and it's definitely too large to send by email.. I no longer have the original damaged, mini DV tape either
                5. I realize now that if I could go back in time, I would change the original recording conditions by: a) using a fresh, new mini DV tape - and b) realizing the tape I did use had broke, I would have asked the guy at DVD.edit.co.uk to salvage EVERYTHING on that tape, not just after the break. At least, that way, he could have sent me the restored footage onto a DVD and I could use everything.
                6. After a lot of frustration and insomnia about this issue, I think I'm forced to reluctantly conclude that I have to bite the bullet and cut my losses and jettison the 28 mins footage, by deleting the original file. At the moment, I have a file that I can watch, but I can't save anywhere because it's too badly corrupted. At least I can make SOMETHING out of it, by using the footage that WAS rescued, which came from the DVD I copied.

                 

                I just wanted to update you with my progress. Have you come to that same conclusion aswell? Do, please let me know if you think there are any other options that I may have overlooked.

                 

                Many thanks & best wishes,

                 

                Daniel Bowes