6 Replies Latest reply on Oct 10, 2015 7:57 AM by trshaner

    Editing question

    walterono Level 1

      When editing images, I regularly find myself shift clicking on Whites and Blacks to determine optimum levels. Is there any way of automating this via a preset or script or something?

        • 1. Re: Editing question
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          You can try to click the Auto button (just above Exposure).

          I don't use it, since it hardly ever produces the results I want - getting the best possible results will always require manual editing.

          But if you have a number of images that all require the same editing, you can create a preset, and apply the it to all of them at once.

          • 2. Re: Editing question
            khatwani Adobe Employee (Admin)

            Hi walterono,

             

            Greetings!!!

            As Per Berntsen suggested , auto do a great job but if you want your custom settings you can apply that.

            After that you can create your custom setting preset and then apply that preset to any image you want to.

            Please check this article : http://help.adobe.com/en_US/lightroom/using/WS2A36C507-E076-4b14-AAC3-87852595D175.html

             

            Regards

            Jitendra

            • 3. Re: Editing question
              walterono Level 1

              But the problem with using a preset is that it will provide absolute values for whites and blacks, whereas shift clicking provides optimum values *for that particular image*.

              • 4. Re: Editing question
                khatwani Adobe Employee (Admin)

                Yes, that is true.

                For that there is no other way that I can think of.

                As for every image, whites and blacks have different values.

                 

                Regards

                Jitendra

                • 5. Re: Editing question
                  Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                  Image editing is subjective - there is no "correct" rendering, it depends on your own preferences and the image itself.

                  Give ten photographers a raw file to process, and you'll get ten different renderings.

                  You just have to accept that getting good results requires manual editing.

                   

                  Not sure what you mean with "Shift clicking", shift is used to slow down the movement of the sliders, and holding down Alt while dragging will show you blocked shadows and burned hihlights.

                  • 6. Re: Editing question
                    trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    walterono wrote:

                     

                    But the problem with using a preset is that it will provide absolute values for whites and blacks, whereas shift clicking provides optimum values *for that particular image*.

                    Shift Click on individual Tone sliders will produce varying results dependent on the order you apply the controls. That's the way PV2012's Image Adaptive Tone controls work. The "recommended" order for adjusting the Tone sliders is from the top-down starting with Exposure. What's interesting is if you use the Auto Tone button it produces slightly different results than top-down Shift click on the individual Tone sliders. Using bottom-up Shift click starting with Blacks produces yet again different settings results.

                     

                    So what is optimum? As mentioned, "Image editing is subjective - there is no "correct" rendering." Using Shift click on the White and Black sliders positions these controls to a "fixed" point of clipping. This is rarely the optimum setting, which will vary dependent on subject and lighting conditions. For landscape images you may want to adjust both controls to produce slightly more clipping for deeper blacks and brighter highlights. But don't try this on a landscape shot on a foggy day if you want to maintain the original appearance. For this type of low contrast image you may want to adjust the Whites and Blacks so there is no clipping. This is why the Auto Tone control works well with some images, but fails with others.

                     

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