10 Replies Latest reply on Dec 8, 2015 12:12 PM by dj_paige

    How to Copy / Save a Photo

    CycleDude

      I've just started using Lightroom and have done some research on this question.  In my catalog are a number of scans I've done where each scanned .jpg files contains one picture.  I'll use Lightroom to crop them but of course want to split them into their own file.  How can I save a duplicate or copy the existing file before cropping?

        • 1. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
          dj_paige Level 9

          You would create a virtual copy in Lightroom.

           

          In the Library module, select the photo then press Ctrl-Apostrophe (or on a Mac Cmd-Apostrophe). Repeat as many times as you want.

          • 2. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
            Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

            The edits are saved to the catalog, and you cannot save an image like you might be used to from other applications.

            If you need to use the image for anything, export the file, which creates a copy of the original including the edits.

            Unless you need to use the image outside Lightroom, you don't need to do anything. Edits are automatically saved to the catalog.

            • 3. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
              Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional
              How can I save a duplicate or copy the existing file before cropping?

              As dj_paige suggests, you can create a virtual copy, but your editing steps are always available in the History panel.

              So if you just want to see what the image looked like before you cropped it, just click the corresponding step in History.

              Editing in Lightroom is non-destructive, and the original file is never changed. It is only when you export or print that the adjustments are applied, and then to a copy of the file.

              • 4. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                CycleDude Level 1

                Thank you both.  While the whole idea of non-destructive is great, in this case I absolutely want it to be destructive.  Basically I have a file that is two pictures.  I want to crop it and save each individually, never caring again about the original scan.  So basically I'll have two choices from a workflow perspective.  Scan each individually or Scan the two pictures together say to my desktop, outside my catalog, use PSE to crop into two files then import into Lightroom.  I have hundreds to scan so probably will do the later.  No need to clog up my catalog with edit information I don't care about.  My catalog is big enough already, 400MB.

                • 5. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                  dj_paige Level 9

                  CycleDude wrote:

                   

                  Thank you both.  While the whole idea of non-destructive is great, in this case I absolutely want it to be destructive.  Basically I have a file that is two pictures.  I want to crop it and save each individually, never caring again about the original scan.  So basically I'll have two choices from a workflow perspective.  Scan each individually or Scan the two pictures together say to my desktop, outside my catalog, use PSE to crop into two files then import into Lightroom.  I have hundreds to scan so probably will do the later.  No need to clog up my catalog with edit information I don't care about.  My catalog is big enough already, 400MB.

                  Sounds like a lot of extra work to use PSE and Lightroom, when Lightroom can do it in a very simple and straightforward fashion.

                  • 6. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                    Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                    You said in your first post that

                    each scanned .jpg files contains one picture.

                    Now that you're telling us it's two - if it were me, I'd scan each one individually. It will be an easier workflow, and more importantly, you can apply individual settings to each scan, if you do two together, you could be in for some impossible compromises.

                    And I would strongly recommend that you do any retouching/spotting in Elements before importing to Lightroom. LR isn't designed for that kind of work, and will slow down or even stop completely if you use the spot removal tool on a lot of dust spots.

                    • 7. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                      Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      CycleDude wrote:

                       

                      I want to crop it and save each individually, never caring again about the original scan... I have hundreds to scan so probably will do the later.  No need to clog up my catalog with edit information I don't care about.  My catalog is big enough already, 400MB.

                      It doesn't have to be an either/or thing. Cropping and basic corrections are very fast in Lightroom, and if you are working in bulk on a large number of scans it's very likely that bulk cropping will go much faster in Lightroom.

                       

                      What I do is scan a large number of images into a folder that is set up in Lightroom as a Watched Folder for Auto-Import. That means I don't have to manually import those scans; they just show up in Lightroom and I work on them as they appear. If an entire film roll of scans needs similar cropping or other tone/color/noise adjustments, it's much faster to copy settings across those 24 or 36 images in Lightroom in one step than to do them one by one in Photoshop.

                       

                      When I'm done in Lightroom, if I don't want to keep the uncorrected scans I simply select all the images and export them as TIFF to another folder that I will keep (another one-step bulk process that's efficient in Lightroom), and I throw out the previous folder. Now I'll do the spotting and other corrections that are better done in Photoshop.

                       

                      As for the "large" 400MB catalog...that isn't large. Many professional Lightroom users measure their catalogs in gigabytes or in tens of thousands of images or more. (A large catalog does not slow down Lightroom.) It's a matter of perspective: While a 1GB catalog for hundreds of images might seem large, chances are if you didn't have Lightroom and instead saved all those images as layered Photoshop files with the same corrections, the total storage space used up by those images might be more than the original non-layered images plus a Lightroom catalog for them.

                      • 8. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                        wobertc Adobe Community Professional

                        In Lightroom you would simply create 3 virtual copies ( Hit [Ctrl+' ] three times!) and Crop each of four 'thumbnails' so as to show each image as a single photo. Export when needed.

                        This only occupies as much space on your hard-drive as your one original scan.

                         

                        Or- Do you have Photoshop? This will create individual images to save.

                        Open the 'multiple' scan of images (eg. four prints) in Photoshop,

                        Goto menu- [Edit > Automate > Crop and Straighten Photos]

                        Save individual images.

                         

                        ScreenShot113.jpgOriginal 'Scan'

                         

                        ScreenShot119.jpg ScreenShot118.jpg...etc... Single Images created by Photoshop!

                        • 9. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                          CycleDude Level 1

                          Thanks for this reply.  I do have Photoshop.  Basically I am scanning in a box of historical family photos.  Scanning one at a time is time consuming given my scanner and the scan resolution I am using.  In some cases I am scanning slides too which take a long time to scan.  Multiple at a time works but the photos scanned together may not be related.  Researching virtual copies and how they are stacked may not work since the end result is the final cropped photos will be moved to an appropriate folder based on the year of the photo.  So I think your photoshop suggestion is my best bet.  I may never have used PSE properly but I tried the File>Automate>Crop and Straighten in Photoshop and that alone was a huge time saver.

                           

                          As I am learning, determining your workflow is so critical.  A lot to learn.  I appreciate your advice.

                           

                          Mark

                          • 10. Re: How to Copy / Save a Photo
                            dj_paige Level 9

                            Researching virtual copies and how they are stacked may not work since the end result is the final cropped photos will be moved to an appropriate folder based on the year of the photo.

                            This is easily handled in Lightroom by keywords, collections, captions, etc. There's really no need to move photos into an appropriate folder.