9 Replies Latest reply on Dec 21, 2015 1:52 AM by D Fosse

    colors for prints

    coltonl28537622

      colors look different from library to develop, what do i trust for actual prints

        • 1. Re: colors for prints
          JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Use the soft proof feature in the develop module. If your printer supports different paper profiles make sure you choose the appropriate profile. Otherwise, I suggest using a sRGB profile. If you are using an online lab, check to see if they have profiles that you can download.

           

          One other thing. Make sure your monitor is properly adjusted. Many recommend using calibration hardware. I have used a much simpler method of adjusting my monitor, but my prints match very well.

          • 2. Re: colors for prints
            Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

            When Library and Develop don't match it's usually due to a defective monitor profile.

            You should calibrate your monitor with a hardware calibrator.

            As a temporary fix and a diagnostic tool, set the monitor profile to sRGB. See How do I change my monitor profile to check whether it’s corrupted?

            • 3. Re: colors for prints
              coltonl28537622 Level 1

              Thanks. Did you calibrate to prints you had made. Is there a setting in lightroom to change to sRGB?

              • 4. Re: colors for prints
                JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                When soft proofing, one of the profiles they can be chosen is sRGB. You cannot switch an image to sRGB in Lightroom, but it is possible to soft proof with that profile.

                 

                The way I adjusted my monitor will bring a lot of criticism from others, I know. But I downloaded a calibration photo from the Internet and printed it without any adjustments whatsoever. Then I adjusted my monitor to match that calibration print, and I find that my prints match very closely.

                • 5. Re: colors for prints
                  coltonl28537622 Level 1

                  monitor is now in sRGB and colors are the same. thanks a bunch

                  • 6. Re: colors for prints
                    Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                    OK, then you should calibrate the monitor with a hardware calibrator, which will create a custom profile based on your monitor's characteristics.

                    JimHess - although I'm sure the workflow you describe works for you, it's not to be recommended. I am no expert on color management, but when you work with an unprofiled monitor and adjust it manually to match a print, you have no color management at all, except for printing to that particular printer from your own computer.

                    The recommended workflow is to work with a profiled monitor, and try to match the print to the monitor using a paper profile from the paper manufacturer, or if necessary have a custom profile made for the paper.

                    • 7. Re: colors for prints
                      JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      Like I said, I will probably receive a lot of criticism for my methodology. The colors match well for my printer, they match well when I send the images to a lab, and they match well when I have a book printed. So far I haven't had any complaints or problems. One day I will probably get burned. Then I might consider something different. I have found that I have only had to adjust brightness and contrast. As far as color adjustments are concerned, they have been left at default settings.

                      • 8. Re: colors for prints
                        D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Per Berntsen wrote:

                         

                        when you work with an unprofiled monitor and adjust it manually to match a print, you have no color management at all, except for printing to that particular printer from your own computer.

                        The recommended workflow is to work with a profiled monitor, and try to match the print to the monitor using a paper profile from the paper manufacturer, or if necessary have a custom profile made for the paper.

                        Well, yes and no (mostly yes). Profile the unit, absolutely. Lightroom and Photoshop needs to remap to an accurate description of the display's response. This isn't just about color balance - it's also the position of the primaries, which in turn affects how individual colors reproduce. Whether a red is orange-ish or magenta-ish, that sort of thing. Monitor primaries and sRGB primaries usually don't match.

                         

                        But you would set your calibration targets to match printed output, not the other way round. The reason for that is very simple - you can change monitor white and black points, but you can't change paper white or max ink density. Those are fixed. At the end of the day, the important thing is to get a match so that you have predictable output. This is also why it's useful to have several calibration targets to match different output conditions.

                         

                        IOW you set monitor white point to match paper white; and monitor black point to match max ink density for that paper. The luminance relationship between these is the contrast range.

                         

                        However, calibration targets are not part of the color management chain as such. White is still remapped to white. Think of it as setting the environment for color management to work in.

                        • 9. Re: colors for prints
                          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          JimHess wrote:

                           

                          You cannot switch an image to sRGB in Lightroom, but it is possible to soft proof with that profile.

                          Actually soft proofing to sRGB is pointless unless you have a wide gamut monitor. You won't see any change.

                           

                          With a standard ("sRGB") monitor, what you see on-screen is already soft proofed to sRGB.