7 Replies Latest reply on Dec 24, 2015 5:32 AM by D Fosse

    Why after convert to DNG, image is darker

    Novetan Level 1

      HI,

       

      I may not posting in the appropriate section, but guess this the closest.

       

      When I use Adobe DNG converter to convert RAW, the end result seems to be abt a stop darker as compare to Jpg. So when I view in Bridge, I have to view the Jpg (which is brighter) and than open the DNG. When I use LR to convert, it seems even darker.

       

      Question:

      1) Why like that?

      2) Will the dynamic range skew towards the left and end up one stop lesser on the highlights? 

      3) Just when I intend to shoot pic in RAW alone, I just have to continue shooting RAW+Jpg (just for the sake of viewing).

       

      Tks.

        • 1. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
          JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Raw images including DNG images can be darker in Camera Raw because the in-camera processing is not recognized by Camera Raw. In-camera processing will affect JPEG images, but raw images need a lot more processing. Camera Raw does not read most of the camera settings.

          • 2. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
            Warunicorn Adobe Community Professional

            Novetan wrote:

             

            HI,

             

            I may not posting in the appropriate section, but guess this the closest.

             

            When I use Adobe DNG converter to convert RAW, the end result seems to be abt a stop darker as compare to Jpg. So when I view in Bridge, I have to view the Jpg (which is brighter) and than open the DNG. When I use LR to convert, it seems even darker.

             

            Question:

            1) Why like that?

            2) Will the dynamic range skew towards the left and end up one stop lesser on the highlights?

            3) Just when I intend to shoot pic in RAW alone, I just have to continue shooting RAW+Jpg (just for the sake of viewing).

             

            Tks.

            When I use Camera Raw to save my (Fujifilm) RAWs as DNGs, there doesn't seem to be any discrepancy between them. (It's all under a supported camera, so...) Even the settings are the same; Camera Calibration, Exposure, etc.

             

            I've never tried the DNG Converter and haven't used Lightroom much before making the switch to Bridge so I can't comment on that.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
              D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              In-camera jpeg processing is always on the aggressive side, to produce an "appealing" result. They're trying to sell cameras after all. But lots of data are thrown away in the process. You may notice, for instance, that highlights are clipped in the jpeg but not at ACR's default settings. ACR on the other hand is conservative and always tries to preserve data, even if the result is less appealing.

               

              The rest is up to you.

               

              Personally I never found the camera jpeg to be a useful measure for anything, other than a very rough exposure confirmation.

               

              There's a whole other school that believes the camera version is the right one. That never made any sense to me, but there it is. Whenever the discussion comes up it tends to take on religious overtones, which is when I pull out...

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
                Warunicorn Adobe Community Professional

                D Fosse wrote:

                 

                In-camera jpeg processing is always on the aggressive side, to produce an "appealing" result. They're trying to sell cameras after all. But lots of data are thrown away in the process. You may notice, for instance, that highlights are clipped in the jpeg but not at ACR's default settings. ACR on the other hand is conservative and always tries to preserve data, even if the result is less appealing.

                 

                The rest is up to you.

                 

                Personally I never found the camera jpeg to be a useful measure for anything, other than a very rough exposure confirmation.

                 

                There's a whole other school that believes the camera version is the right one. That never made any sense to me, but there it is. Whenever the discussion comes up it tends to take on religious overtones, which is when I pull out...

                This. I have to hold my tongue sometimes. Nobody but obsessive pixel-peepers is going to care. Gee, I really care that your image is 60 megapixels. No, I'm not looking at the composition, what I'm really looking at is that pixel in the corner! It's just not sharp enough!

                • 5. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Well, anyway, this varies a lot from camera to camera. Nikon jpegs look great on their own, but aren't always very truthful to the actual scene.

                   

                  This is a big deal over on the Lightroom forum. New posts all the time.

                  1 person found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
                    Novetan Level 1

                    As mentioned, I shot in Jpg+RAW. So when view from LCD during shooting, the highlights seems just right without clipping.

                     

                    So if I were to just shoot in RAW, does it means I'm able to push one stop brighter when view and composed using LCD?

                    • 7. Re: Why after convert to DNG, image is darker
                      D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      Maybe, probably. Do some tests. On my Nikon D800, I do get an extra stop or more, before any real danger of sensor clipping. It depends on the scene, of course.

                       

                      "Exposure To The Right", ETTR, is advised in any case. That means giving as much exposure as you can, but without clipping, regardless of how the scene really looks. You'll adjust that in post. Basically you expose for the highlights you want to keep, not middle gray. Specular highlights can usually be allowed to clip.

                       

                      The way linear raw works, most of the information is up there in the high stops (number of bits double/half for each stop).

                      1 person found this helpful