7 Replies Latest reply on Jan 10, 2016 8:21 AM by DdeGannes

    JPEG v RAW colors

    DMajstorovic

      Hi everyone,

       

      I had a shooting few days ago and I used JPEG+RAW(NEF) setting on my camera. Now, I wanted to edit photos, so I made a new collection and imported all photos to Photoshop Lightroom v5.6. However, while JPEGs look the way I expected, RAW ones look way more aggressive/vivid than JPEGs. Please take a look at provided example - purple RGB led stripe in the upper right corner - it's over-saturated. Both images are untouched, straight-out-of-camera samples.

       

      Why is this so?

       

      FYI, if I open both images in the Windows Photo Viewer, RAW one won't look so over-saturated anymore. Btw, I'm usually shooting JPEGs, so I haven't noticed this so far.

       

      Thanks, cheers!

       

      D

       

      Capture.PNG

       

      Message was edited by: Domagoj Majstorovic - added image: JPEG (LEFT) --- RAW (RIGHT)

        • 1. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
          Akash Sharma Adobe Employee

          Hi dmajstorovic,

           

          Raw Shooting in true sense will give you better results after editing  as they are  uncompressed(Reason why it is appears different from Jpeg's)

          FYI, if I open both images in the Windows Photo Viewer, RAW one won't look so over-saturated anymore. Btw, I'm usually shooting JPEGs, so I haven't noticed this so far.

          See RAW vs JPEG .

           

          Regards,

          Akash

          • 2. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
            F. McLion Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Please take a look at this video and see if this answers your question: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmEeJvcAsWQ

            • 3. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
              Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

              First of all, the Windows photo viewer can't view raw files, so it displays the raw file's jpg preview, which should be identical to the jpg.

               

              Second, the jpg has blown highlights in the LED stripe, that are not blown in the raw file. This will probably increase the intensity the purple as well. (one big advantage shooting raw is the ability to recover blown highlights)

              If you want the highlights like the jpg, try dragging the highlights slider a little to the right in Develop.

              Apart from the purple, I can't see any major color differences between the two.

              • 4. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
                DMajstorovic Level 1

                Hi guys, thanks for the heads up!

                 

                @F. McLion - This works great - by setting it to a Standard Profile in the Camera Calibration panel I get pretty much the same "look" as a JPEG version (in terms of colors), i.e. the stripe is not over-saturated anymore.

                 

                @Per Berntsen - 1) Are you sure about WPW's inability to display NEF format? According to this, it can actually display it. I've just checked it, there is a difference, but smaller than in LR, tho. 2) Yes, there is not much difference but my only concern was the stripe because I've expected image to be washed out not vice-versa. Hence, this got me thinking that maybe I've got something not set properly so I made this query.

                 

                Anyway, the matter is much clearer now and this is enough for me to say "case closed".

                 

                Again, thanks everyone!

                 

                Cheers,

                 

                D

                • 5. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
                  trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  dmajstorovic wrote:

                  I had a shooting few days ago and I used JPEG+RAW(NEF) setting on my camera. Now, I wanted to edit photos, so I made a new collection and imported all photos to Photoshop Lightroom v5.6. However, while JPEGs look the way I expected, RAW ones look way more aggressive/vivid than JPEGs. Please take a look at provided example - purple RGB led stripe in the upper right corner - it's over-saturated. Both images are untouched, straight-out-of-camera samples.

                   

                  You are describing two separate issues:

                   

                  1) Slight differences between in-camera JPEG rendering and LR's raw file rendering.

                   

                  Try all of the 'Camera' profiles located in the Camera Calibration panel under 'Profile.' You can create custom Develop presets with specific camera profiles and settings that you prefer as a "starting point."

                   

                  2) A known issue with Adobe DNG Camera Profile rendering of UV light (purple light).

                  Help with RAW files and custom white balance.

                   

                  This is a "unique" and different issue. I suspect the in-camera JPEG has no clipping in the purple light area that renders darker with the raw file. Along with trying different 'Camera' profiles try turning Vibrance down slightly in the Tone panel and increasing Saturation if necessary to keep the other colors looking normal.

                  • 6. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
                    DMajstorovic Level 1

                    Wow, that's a great info, thanks trshaner!

                     

                    Actually, the "1)" it's not an issue - I can deal with flat colors (I've expected that). It's the "2)", i.e. "purple light" rendition in LR that caught me "off guard". I didn't expect that kind of clipping, but, as suggested, selecting appropriate Color Profile in the Camera Calibration panel easily deals with it.

                     

                    It's good to know this, thanks.

                    • 7. Re: JPEG v RAW colors
                      DdeGannes Adobe Community Professional

                      DMajstorovic I think the respondents have covered the issue adequately. I just wish to make a  point that RAW files simply have no colors this is applied when rendering is done by the raw processing software.