4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 18, 2016 7:54 AM by Per Berntsen

    Capture sharpening - RAW's from camera without anti-aliasing filter

    chriso84972911 Level 1

      Hi Guys,

       

      The arrival of several students with Fuji cameras to a digital workflow session i was teaching prompted me ask this question.

       

      Do RAW images that have been captured using a camera(s) that does not have an anti-aliasing filter (mirror-less Fuji's) or has had it's effect canceled (Canon 5DS-R) still require capture sharpening in ACR/LR, or can this step, effectively, be removed from the standard workflow?

       

      I am aware that capture sharpening compensates for the loss of sharpness during the capture process of the digital photo caused by the anti-aliasing filter of the camera's sensor and (ii) the Bayer grid interpolation of the RAW conversion, so was thinking a reduced amount may still be required?

       

      Your thoughts please

      Chris

        • 1. Re: Capture sharpening - RAW's from camera without anti-aliasing filter
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          The general rule is that capture sharpening should produce a reasonably sharp image, but not too sharp -

          when viewed at 1:1 (very important)

          Cameras without anti-aliasing filters are no exception to this rule - like my Nikon D800E.

          I find that even with a very sharp lens, some capture sharpening is required.

          • 2. Re: Capture sharpening - RAW's from camera without anti-aliasing filter
            chriso84972911 Level 1

            Hi per,

             

            Thanks for the response.


            I may be missing something, but i suppose an obvious question arises; If you still need to apply capture sharpening to the RAW from a camera without an AA Filter to get the image where you want it, is it really worth getting that camera? For example, the 5DS and 5DS R are the same camera, with the slight exception that the "R" version "cancels" the effect of the anti-alias filter used in the normal 5DS and most other DSLRs to get slightly higher sharpness at the risk of moiré on very fine repeating patterns. But if you still need to apply 'some capture sharpening', why not just get the 5DS (or any high end digital camera with an AA filter)  and apply the standard amount of capture sharpening? You pay less money and reduce the chance of moire affecting the image.

            • 3. Re: Capture sharpening - RAW's from camera without anti-aliasing filter
              dj_paige Level 9

              Perhaps this absence of an AA filter is just marketing.

               

              Or perhaps it is designed for that small portion of people who want to do as little post-processing as possible (you know, the ones who say "get the shot right in camera")

              • 4. Re: Capture sharpening - RAW's from camera without anti-aliasing filter
                Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional
                If you still need to apply capture sharpening to the RAW from a camera without an AA Filter to get the image where you want it, is it really worth getting that camera?

                It's perfectly to normal to have to apply capture sharpening. It's possible that some medium format backs don't need it, or at least very little, but I have no experience with them.

                 

                why not just get the 5DS (or any high end digital camera with an AA filter)  and apply the standard amount of capture sharpening? You pay less money and reduce the chance of moire affecting the image.

                The less sharpening you need to apply, the better the final image will look, and print. If you take the same picture with let's say a low quality 50mm lens and a high quality 50mm lens, you can sharpen the low quality image more to make it look better, but the high quality image will always look best.

                 

                After buying my Nikon D800E, I read somewhere, possibly on dpreview.com, that the sharpness advantage of not having an AA filter varies with the f/stop used.

                With the lens fully open, the difference in sharpness is clearly visible, and as you stop down, it becomes less and less and visible. At typical working apertures like f/8 to 11, the difference is supposed to be minimal.

                As for the moiré problem, I have seen very little of it. It has happened sometimes with sunlit tiled roofs on houses in aerial shots, and was easily removed in Lightroom.

                Other subjects, like fabrics, may be more difficult.