3 Replies Latest reply on Mar 17, 2016 9:56 AM by Peter Spier

    Working with enormous images in a coffee table book

    HarleySoftailer Level 1

      I have written books before, but never done the layout.  I am now working on my fourth publication and will be doing the writing as well as the design and layout.  The book will be a coffee table book (12" wide x 9 tall) and will feature at least 50 photos that will span the entire width and height of two pages with bleed off the page (I have set the bleed to .125").

       

      Principle photography is now complete and I just got the pictures back and they're enormous (one pic alone that will print across two pages has dimensions of 7276 x 4856 - 30.0" x 20.2" and is 10.52 MB in disk size).

       

      I'm learning InDesign by viewing the tutorials at adobe.com, watching everything I can find on YouTube and going through the Classroom In A Book publication on InDesign CC.

       

      What I would like to know is what you folks - the experts - would recommend to someone trying to do what I'm trying to do with the beginner skills that I posses.  I have very strong skills in Muse, Edge, Dreamweaver, Fireworks and such and am comfortable with the keyboard shortcuts and basic concepts of frames and placement that one learns when using those programs.  But desktop layout/publishing is a new frontier for me.

       

      One thing I've already noticed is that when I place an image into a frame on two facing pages, pull the frame out to the bleed edges and adjust the picture to proportionately fill the frame, it looks extremely pixelated.  Is this a function of the massive down-sizing?  Do I need to have additional post-production work done on the images themselves?

       

      Any and all advice is very greatly appreciated.

       

      Thanks.

       

      Andy.

        • 1. Re: Working with enormous images in a coffee table book
          Steve Werner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          To improve you viewing resolution choose View > Display Performance > High Quality Display.

           

          Two more resources to learn InDesign:

           

          (a) Sandee Cohen's excellent and inexpensive "InDesign CC QuickStart Guide" from Peachpit press. It's the best book for beginners.

           

          (b) David Blatner's "InDesign CC Essential Training" video course on Lynda.com. You can get 10 days with a free trial.

          • 2. Re: Working with enormous images in a coffee table book
            rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Is this a function of the massive down-sizing?

            No. When you place an image a JPEG proxy is created for the preview. Check View>Display Performance, which will affect the quality of the proxy view.

             

            InDesign doesn't do any resampling, it resizes or scales the pixels. You do have the option to lower resolution when you export to PDF, but in your case you will need all of the image resolution—7276 pixels at 24" would be 303 pixels per inch, which is what you need for most high end print work.

             

            10.52 MB is actually quite small for that size image. They must be saved as JPEGs?

            • 3. Re: Working with enormous images in a coffee table book
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              HarleySoftailer wrote:

              Principle photography is now complete and I just got the pictures back and they're enormous (one pic alone that will print across two pages has dimensions of 7276 x 4856 - 30.0" x 20.2" and is 10.52 MB in disk size).

               

              The saved "dimensions" of 30.0 x 20.2 are actually irrelevant (and indicate the saved resolution is about 240 ppi). What counts is the "Effective Resolution" -- the resolution at the scaled size you will use for output, and scaling this image down to 24.25 wide (your full spread plus bleed width) gives you a more realistic (for a coffee table book) 300 ppi effective resolution. You wouldn't want an image any smaller than this.