10 Replies Latest reply on Mar 23, 2016 5:18 AM by rob day

    Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign

    SIcsempertyrannis Level 1

      I was pre-flighting Illustrator and InDesign files in CC14 yesterday. The Illustrator files imported into InDesign contained both spot and rgb colors in them. Yet, when I chose to add all unnamed colors in the InDesign palette the colors did not load. I am not completely up to speed with CC14- -Is CC now eliminating the colors that are not actually being used in the artwork? In other words, those colors were present in the Illustrator palette- -but not being used on the artwork- -and did not show up in the InDesign file upon import. Formerly, whether or not the color was actually used in the artwork it would still show up in the InDesign file if it were present in the Illustrator palette. That doesnt seem to be the case anymore. Is that so?  The separation view in InDesign and Acrobat showed nothing but the CMYK plates. Please advise. Thank you.

        • 1. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

          If you place an AI file with a spot color into InDesign it will add automatically the used spot colors as swatches in the INDD file. If none spot colors are added, none are used.

          • 2. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
            SIcsempertyrannis Level 1

            Thanks, Will. So- -then- -I dont have to worry about unused spot colors and rgb swatches importing into indesign file if they are only in the color palette and not being used in the artwork?

            • 3. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
              Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

              No, if it is not used, it is not imported.

              Even if you have spot colors, you can convert them to process colors or replace them with other colors from within InDesign. In the swatch panel menu or in the PDF export dialog (Output section) open the ink manager and select the spot color (if it is in the document) and replace it with a process color or with another spot color or process ink upon output.

              • 4. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                SIcsempertyrannis Level 1

                True- -but I really hate the idea of releasing links with spot colors- -and worse yet RGB swatches- -in them when sending files to the printer. Old dog- -I guess. Thanks again for the instructions.

                • 5. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                  Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                  That would not be the case if you send PDFs to the printer and work with the ink manager. It is better and more accurate in the aspect of color translation from spot to process that it would be if you replace the graphic from Illustrator with another one.

                  Never send an open file to the printer, send an exported PDF and the printer will not know that the logo had in the original file a spot color. Why should the printer bother the linke file in InDesign? You would neither place image files which were converted to CMYK in Photoshop but are converted upon export in InDesign and are still in RGB. Both are recommended standards with InDesign.

                  • 6. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                    SIcsempertyrannis Level 1

                    Most of our printers require native files w/fonts and links- -as well as the pdf. I didn't follow the point you were making with the following >You would neither place image files which were converted to CMYK in Photoshop but are converted upon export in InDesign and are still in RGB. Both are recommended standards with InDesign.<  Can you explain?

                    • 7. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                      Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                      There is no reason for any printer to ask for a native file, if you send them a PDF according to the standards they ask for. Imagine, if a printer would work with open files, he must have expert knowledge of any program on the market and any version with any operation system. Let us look only on InDesign: If he would open thus files, you want to send them: He has to have the same InDesign version as all his clients. He has to open it on the the same OS as it was made with the same version. You have to embed YOUR user dictionary and the printer has to use it without using his own dictionry. Otherwise it would change the text. He has to have the same font or he had to licence it, you or he would have to pay it. Even if he had the very same font, you wouldn't be sure if it is the same version. Anything has an influence to the file.

                       

                      Or even if you linke file, if you have graphics from Illustrator, you are placing them as AI files. (You should never use EPS!) But if the printer is opening these files he would cause massive damage if used fonts or linked files are not included. But InDesign can work with an AI file as it is a complete file in the view of InDesign.

                       

                      In former days, let say before 2002, it was common use to convert image files in Photoshop from RGB to CMYK and import them as TIFF CMYK files. Today only in exceptions it would be done so. Now you will save any image in Photoshop as RGB with color profile and place as PSD (if you need transparency and/or layers) or as PDF (if you have vector/form layers or text) or as High Quality JPG files, if the images are flat and without transparency. Later, when the PDF is made as PDF/X-1a these images have been converted to the final output color space or if the PDF/X-3 or X-4 is exported, all images remain in their original color space and are converted at the output. The same can be done with spot colors. In most cases they are converted upon PDF Export via the settings of the ink manager as I have described above. (To make this work fine, you should avoid EPS and DISTILLER and PRINTING to PDF as postscript does not support color management.)
                      More input to this topic: http://indesignsecrets.com/import-rgb-images-indesign-convert-cmyk-export.php and http://indesignsecrets.com/tiff-vs-psd-vs-eps-vs-pdf-vs.php

                      Or here in the forum: Re: Re: Converting Images to CMYK for Print Publication

                      • 8. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                        SIcsempertyrannis Level 1

                        Haha- -and does it also rain money in your perfect world?! Wish that's the way it really was here- -would love to just release the Hi-Res pdf- -but we can't. Thank you for the information on the RGB vs CMYK- -I will read up on that topic. Much obliged.

                        • 9. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                          I think a printer who begins to work in your files will cost more at the end than a perfect PDF. What should a printer do with a PDF other than print?

                          And do you have the money to pay the licences for your font that the print can use them legally?

                           

                          Sending open files cost at the end more as sending a perfect PDF. And if you get the jobsettings or its information you can send a perfect PDF to the printer.

                          • 10. Re: Unnamed Colors from Illus to InDesign
                            rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            There is a problem with the way Ink Manager converts spot color tints, so if you are using tints it is better to convert spots to process via the Swatch Options dialog.

                             

                            Re: Ink Manager Bug/Problem?