1 Reply Latest reply on Apr 3, 2016 4:59 AM by Rick Gerard

    Wrong frame-rate after rendering

    Lioo159

      Hello,

      I'm currently experiencing the following problem:

      After the render process's finished, the video output has a wrong frame-rate, but the same amount of frames.

      So the video it self get stretched, but the audio-length remains the same:

      BwFqroc.png

      (red line marks the end of the audio and the expected video-length)

       

      Here the render settings:

      L1QczAk.pnghjUzR8N.pngbQafwwH.png7HuNBn9.png

       

      And here the output:

      3CDktzP.png

       

      So the video gets stretched about 17% (117% of Original) but the audio remains at the original length.

      What am I doing wrong?

       

      Thanks in advance!

        • 1. Re: Wrong frame-rate after rendering
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          First, you should not be using the Render Cue to render h.264 because it will not do multi pass rendering and it doesn't and never did do a good job. You should be using the Adobe Media Encoder and render an h.264 file as an MP4 using one of the standard presets.

           

          Second, your comp size is odd and doesn't fit any of the h.264 standards for frame size and frame rate. H.264/MPEG-4 AVC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

           

          Third point, your output info looks like it is an info panel from playback. This reports the current playback frame rate. If you want to see what the encoder delivered then drag the file into AE and check out the info in the Project Panel when you select the footage or drag your footage into Premiere Pro and check out the footage properties. I would bet that it shows 60 fps. Your system just won't play it back at 60 fps.

           

          Fourth point, Why 60 fps? Most footage that is 60fps is actually 59.94 fps and most of the time that footage is interlaced. It takes some massive hardware to playback greater than HD frame size at much above 29.97 fps. There would only be one reason for picking 60 fps and that is if your original footage was 60 fps. Many times footage from a cell phone or from a screen capture program is not recorded precisely at a standard frame rate so you should fix that before you begin. Unless you specifically know that the majority of your audience can playback your footage at 60fps then you should be working at 29.97.

           

          Unless you absolutely understand compression, formats, video standards and delivery systems you should be using the standard presets in AE for rendering and you should be using the Adobe Media Encoder for all rendering of highly compressed deliverables like mp4 files. You should never use h.264 in a Quicktime container because Apple stopped supporting that a long time ago and it never worked right anyway.

           

          So, to solve your problem pick a legal standard frame size for your project, if you have to use the Render Cue and the output module to render a production master to a lossless or nearly lossless format and then use the Adobe Media Encoder to render your compressed deliverable.