27 Replies Latest reply on Apr 11, 2016 11:07 PM by F. McLion

    Exported photo different from lightroom

    wcn_dave Level 1

      Lightroom on left, exported photo on the right, both on same monitor at the same time.

       

      The saturation or colour balance or vibrance is clearly different between the two.

       

      Any known reasons for this?

       

       

      https://flic.kr/p/F71iF6

       

      F71iF6

        • 2. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
          wcn_dave Level 1

          I am sure my screen could be properly calibrated, something I want to find out about later, however the point was that the lightroom version, and the exported version, look different, on the same screen... that shouldn't happen should it?

          • 3. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
            trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            What model monitor and Web Browser are you using? If you have a wide gamut monitor see this for the cause: WIDE GAMUT ADOBE RGB LCD Monitors Screens Troubleshooting Over Saturated sRGB Color Reviews on the Web Tutorial

             

            If you have a standard gamut (~sRGB) monitor the most likely cause is an incompatible monitor profile. This will also cause the Develop module preview to look different than the Library module preview. Follow the instructions at the link

            • 4. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
              wcn_dave Level 1

              I am using a Dell U2711 with display port.  However there's no browser involved.

               

              I will read through the links you sent, and probably bump my calibration learning up my to do list!

              • 5. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                Lightroom is color managed and uses the monitor profile to display colors correctly.

                Most other programs, including any photo viewer built into Windows 10 are not, and can not be expected to show correct colors.

                This is especially true if you have a wide gamut monitor, where colors will always be over saturated in non-color managed programs, your screenshot could indicate that you do.

                So what make and model is your monitor?

                And what color space did you use for the exported image?

                You should always use sRGB, unless you have good reason to use a different profile.

                • 6. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                  Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional
                  I am using a Dell U2711 with display port.  However there's no browser involved.

                  As far as I can tell from the specs, this is a wide gamut monitor, in which case you'll never get correct color in non-color managed apps like the Windows 10 Photo viewer or Photos.

                  The solution is to use only color managed apps to view your exported files, like the free Irfanview, or ACDSee Pro (not free).

                  Most web browsers have some color management, and should display correct colors as long as you export in sRGB.

                  Note that Internet Explorer and the Edge browser are not color managed, and will display all images over-saturated on wide gamut monitors.

                  • 7. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                    F. McLion Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Use Firefox as browser and activate as described here: http://ntown.at/de/2013/12/28/firefox-color-management/

                    • 8. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                      trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      wcn_dave wrote:

                       

                      I am using a Dell U2711 with display port.

                      The Dell U2711 monitor is wide gamut (96% Adobe RGB). Viewing pictures in ANY non-color manged application will make reds and other colors to lesser degree look more saturated.

                       

                      As Flickr and other Websites with proper color.

                       

                      For viewing images outside of LR you'll need to use a color managed viewer as suggested by . If you have the Adobe Photography plan with LR and PS you can also use Adobe Bridge for viewing images. It is fully color managed.

                       

                      wcn_dave wrote:

                       

                      I will read through the links you sent, and probably bump my calibration learning up my to do list!

                      If the LR Develop module preview does NOT look different than the LR Library module preview than the monitor profile is not causing the issue. Switch back and forth between modules to determine if there is a difference. If they look the same your current monitor profile is OK. If different the best solution is to use a monitor calibrator to create a custom monitor profile.

                       

                      BTW- There is no way to properly adjust or judge picture color and brightness using a monitor that isn't "calibrated." In the screenshots you posted on Flickr the photo viewer image actually looks more accurate than the LR screenshot. I'm using FireFox with Color Management setup and a calibrated wide gamut monitor. This is an indication that your monitor profile is incompatible with LR OR simply due to making adjustments with an uncalibrated monitor.

                       

                      Here's what Is see:

                      LR vs Flickr.jpg

                      • 9. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                        Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                        On Windows, all the major browsers - Chrome, Opera and Firefox - now display images in sRGB, Adobe RGB and ProPoto correctly on a wide gamut monitor. Firefox even does it without enabling color management.

                        On Android, only sRGB is correct (the others are desaturated) - as for OSX and iOS, I dont't know.

                        I have set up a test page for color profiles here:

                        Test page for color profiles

                        • 10. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          wcn_dave wrote:

                           

                          I am using a Dell U2711 (...) I will read through the links you sent, and probably bump my calibration learning up my to do list!

                          A bit late to this thread, but I can only repeat what I always say:

                           

                          A wide gamut monitor can only be used in a fully color managed environment. You need to use color managed software, and you need to calibrate and profile the unit properly, using a calibrator.

                           

                          Before uncritically selling these units, vendors really should inform and warn their customers about the implications. A sticker on the screen should do it - god knows there are enough of them already, but this one would actually say something relevant and useful...

                          • 11. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                            wcn_dave Level 1

                            Thanks for so many answers and things to think about!

                             

                            I am not really doing colour adjustment for printing as I rarely do that, and anyway my printer is not calibrated in any way.

                             

                            I do however want to see what they will look like to other people, who view them on web, email etc and could be using anything.

                             

                            Now I understand that every monitor is different, I have 4 screens and with a grey desktop they all look very different.

                             

                            However I figured if I could use my best screen (read largest with highest DPI) for work, then any deviation from that for other people / screens would be "their problem", ie I would be as close to "true" as possible, and they would be off in one direction or another, however at least the source material would be right. (close)

                             

                            I do think I have some issues, as I get various colour profile warning messages with some software, so I will dig into it more for sure.

                             

                            Thanks again. I will be back though, as this is a very murky area for me (see what I did there...)

                             

                            Cheers!

                             

                            Dave    

                            • 12. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                              trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                              wcn_dave wrote:

                              However I figured if I could use my best screen (read largest with highest DPI) for work, then any deviation from that for other people / screens would be "their problem", ie I would be as close to "true" as possible, and they would be off in one direction or another, however at least the source material would be right. (close)

                              You can check and adjust your monitor using the test images at this site:

                               

                              LCD monitor test images

                               

                              You'll need to install and use FireFox Web browser so that the images render correctly on your wide gamut monitor. This should help you get the best possible image rendering without using an actual monitor calibrator. Pay particular attention to the Gamma Calibration, Black Level, and White Saturation tests. You will want to set your monitor's controls for 6500K Color Temperature and 2.2 Gamma before any other adjustments.

                               

                              Keep in mind if the currently installed monitor profile is incompatible with LR the Develop and Library module preview will look different. You'll need to correct that using the link provided in his reply #1. Assign the Adobe RGB color profile and NOT sRGB. More about your display here:

                               

                              http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2711.htm

                              • 13. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                wcn_dave Level 1

                                So reading up on this, and just when I think I get my head around it...

                                 

                                One thing that confuses me, on Per Bernsten link above, all images are identical.  I also keep finding pages by G Ballard, which I think are making me more confused.

                                 

                                For example here: WEB BROWSER COLOR MANAGEMENT Tutorial - Test Page FireFox Safari Chrome Internet Explorer IE 10- FILES have embedded ICC…

                                 

                                The images on the left are always the same on rollover or not, the image on the right always gets more saturated on rollover.

                                 

                                However this happens in ALL browsers, on ALL my monitors.

                                 

                                I thought it was supposed to only happen on my wide Gamut monitor, and not in Firefox...

                                 

                                I am a technical person, worked in software development and web for 20 years now, however this, my first foray into colour management seems enough to make my brain melt.

                                 

                                Can I try to summarise what I know so far, and see if I am on track before moving on?  I read lots of posts that tell people to "read up before you post stupid questions", however having ready more than 50 pages, I think I found each page raised a new set of questions! I also find this helps sort it in my mind, to write it out...

                                 

                                Here I go!

                                 

                                Gamut is the colour range that a monitor is capable of displaying.

                                sRGB is a colour range defined years ago that has become standard for software / OS / Web.

                                Monitors typically have a Gamut that ought to cover most of the sRGB range, meaning all good.

                                If the software says, make this fully green, 0-255-0, then the monitor's full green is the same as what the designer expected.

                                 

                                If it's slightly off, you can create an ICC profile which will modify/map values before they are sent to the screen.

                                Windows and most software can understand and use ICC that modify before it's sent to screen?

                                or is this done by the OS? Graphics card? application?

                                so if your ICC profile says "my screen is greener than normal, map green 255 to green 200", then 200 is sent to monitor.

                                ICC profiles basically allow for the fact that no screen is perfect out of the box.

                                 

                                Adobe RGB is a bigger colour "specification" or space.

                                Some monitors have wider gamut that supports AdobeRGB

                                 

                                Because values such as 0-255-0 are converted by (the monitor?) to a colour, they will be different on sRGB vs A-RGB monitor as the extremities of the colour space are bigger on A-RGB, meaning everything is more saturated.

                                 

                                Images can be tagged to a colour space.

                                If the software understands that tagging, it can do something about it.

                                 

                                But how does e.g. Photoshop know what monitor you have?  Is it just as simple as sRGB pictures, set monitor to RGB mode (using OSD), and A-RGB set to one of the other modes?  I can't see how someone with sRGB monitor can work with A-RGB colour space anyway, if they can't see it...

                                 

                                Is that what the monitor modes do? you have standard, some presets, then A-RGB and sRGB, are they all side Gamut except sRGB which does some emulation within the monitor?

                                 

                                That leads me on to the chain of events that seem to control things here, program reads tagged space, converts as necessary, (if it can), sends to OS, which applies ICC? which sends to graphics card, which applies LUT (all about gamma and totally irrelevant for this topic?) which sends to monitor, which applies it's profile settings...

                                 

                                Phew, that's a lot.  Perhaps it's really simpler.

                                 

                                If using A-RGB in Photoshop, set monitor to A-RGB and load the ICC profile in windows.

                                otherwise set monitor to sRGB and choose it's ICC profile in windows...  bit of chopping and changing...

                                or accept the extra saturation.

                                • 14. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                  You're on the right track here, much of the above is correct. But then you take a wrong turn and suddenly everything gets complicated.

                                   

                                  This isn't complicated. It's really simple.

                                   

                                  Are you familiar with profile conversions in Photoshop? That's what happens here, exactly the same process, only performed by the application, on the fly, without any user intervention.

                                   

                                  This time, the conversion is from document profile to monitor profile. The result of that conversion is sent to the monitor. So you can see the monitor profile is crucial here. If the profile is inaccurate, the conversion is inaccurate, and Lightroom/Photoshop displays incorrectly. Because monitor profiles are so critical, people spend money on calibrators. It's money well spent.

                                   

                                  Applications that are not color managed don't do any of this. They just send the numbers in the file directly through to the monitor - and it displays according to the characteristics of the monitor in question.

                                  • 15. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                    wcn_dave Level 1

                                    Thanks, I hope I am getting there!

                                     

                                    An i1display Pro is on it's way, hopefully that will do the job.  Ironically my tripod is more expensive than my camera, and my monitor calibration will be as much as my monitor!

                                     

                                    However I don't think I am all the way there yet.

                                     

                                    Let's say I have an sRGB image with normal RGB monitor.

                                    One pixel is marked as green 200.  That must be a defined spot in the RGB colourspace.

                                    So, my calibration tool found that when G200 was on screen, it was actually G210, and it wrote an ICC file to correct this.  All good.

                                     

                                    Now I have changed the profile on my screen using OSD to Adobe RGB.

                                    I also switch to the Adobe calibrated RGB profile in windows.

                                    let's say that when calibrating in A-RGB mode that G200 (which is actually brighter than the G200 in RGB space), was 220 on monitor, and wrote that to the ICC file.

                                     

                                    Adobe will read the monitor profile and convert 200 to 220, however that's now taking 200 from RGB image and displaying as effective 200 (actually sending 220) to my screen which is Adobe RGB.

                                     

                                    My question is how does Photoshop know that I am using wide Gamut screen?

                                    Is there something in the profile which tells Photoshop this, so it says "ah, I have G200 from RGB space, I know that's G180 in Adobe RGB space (from a fixed industry standard mapping of the colour spaces), and then read my monitor profile to find what corrected value for 180 it should send?

                                     

                                    Thanks again, and sorry if I'm being really dense, or overcomplicating!

                                    • 16. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                      trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                      wcn_dave wrote:

                                       

                                      One thing that confuses me, on Per Bernsten link above, all images are identical.  I also keep finding pages by G Ballard, which I think are making me more confused.

                                       

                                      For example here: WEB BROWSER COLOR MANAGEMENT Tutorial - Test Page FireFox Safari Chrome Internet Explorer IE 10- FILES have embedded ICC…

                                       

                                      The images on the left are always the same on rollover or not, the image on the right always gets more saturated on rollover.

                                       

                                      However this happens in ALL browsers, on ALL my monitors.

                                      If the images on the left look the same it means your browsers are using the embedded color profile, but not necessarily the monitor profile! The images on the right should change when you rollover. Read the text on that page as to why. If the browser does not use the monitor profile then in your wide gamut monitor Reds and other colors will look over-saturated in the left side image. Open FireFox and Internet Explorer to the above page link and compare the left hand images in each browser side-by-side. What do you see? It should look correct in FF and over-saturated in IE as below, but only if FF is properly setup to use the monitor profile:

                                       

                                      FireFox vs Internet Explorer.jpg

                                      • 17. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                        trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                        wcn_dave wrote:

                                        Thanks again, and sorry if I'm being really dense, or overcomplicating!

                                        Yes you are over-complicating and worrying about the "details" of color management that aren't necessary. This may help:

                                         

                                        Color management: Implementation part 1

                                         

                                        The"exact details" of color management implementation at the system level really isn't necessary, but at the above link there is another flow chart with more detail:

                                         

                                        Color management: Implementation part 2

                                        With a color managed application and properly calibrated monitor all of this stuff happens automatically with no human intervention.

                                        • 18. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                          wcn_dave wrote:

                                           

                                          My question is how does Photoshop know that I am using wide Gamut screen?

                                          Photoshop only knows the monitor profile. But if the profile is correct, it contains the position of the primaries and hence the gamut.

                                           

                                          The monitor profile has to be an accurate description of the monitor's actual response. Changing any setting in the monitor invalidates the profile.

                                          • 19. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                            Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional
                                            Now I have changed the profile on my screen using OSD to Adobe RGB.

                                            When you get your calibrator, set the screen to Factory default (or similar) on the OSD.

                                            Then run the calibration, and don't touch the OSD settings again.

                                             

                                            My question is how does Photoshop know that I am using wide Gamut screen?

                                            Photoshop knows this from the monitor profile.

                                            An profile created by a hardware calibrator is an accurate description of the monitor characteristics, be it wide gamut or not.

                                            • 20. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                              trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                              Per Berntsen wrote:

                                               

                                              Now I have changed the profile on my screen using OSD to Adobe RGB.

                                              When you get your calibrator, set the screen to Factory default (or similar) on the OSD.

                                              Then run the calibration, and don't touch the OSD settings again.

                                              TFT Central suggest using the 'Custom Color Mode Setting.' You can see the settings they used and results obtained from monitor calibration here under 'Calibration Results:' Dell U2711 Review

                                              • 21. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                wcn_dave Level 1

                                                Thanks again for all the feedback, and for being patient with me!

                                                trshaner wrote:

                                                 

                                                Color management: Implementation part 2

                                                With a color managed application and properly calibrated monitor all of this stuff happens automatically with no human intervention.

                                                 

                                                but using a wide gamut monitor with all my applications doesn't work...

                                                D Fosse wrote:

                                                 

                                                wcn_dave wrote:

                                                 

                                                My question is how does Photoshop know that I am using wide Gamut screen?

                                                Photoshop only knows the monitor profile. But if the profile is correct, it contains the position of the primaries and hence the gamut.

                                                 

                                                The monitor profile has to be an accurate description of the monitor's actual response. Changing any setting in the monitor invalidates the profile.

                                                So Photoshop knows from monitor profile to make adjustments when sending out data.

                                                it also knows from the current working colour space how to make those adjustments, so it can take an sRGB image, and send it correctly to screen, as well as taking an Adobe RGB image and sending correctly to screen because it will sort of do an internal conversion first.  Then map (eg RGB 0-255-0 to HG monitor 0-200-0) because that's the data the ICC file contains.  I think that's clear now.

                                                Per Berntsen wrote:

                                                 

                                                Now I have changed the profile on my screen using OSD to Adobe RGB.

                                                When you get your calibrator, set the screen to Factory default (or similar) on the OSD.

                                                Then run the calibration, and don't touch the OSD settings again.

                                                 

                                                However, if i stop using photoshop and start using IE and Powerpoint, I will be getting over-saturation, so my thought was to switch between monitor profiles, and at the same time switch between the ICC profiles that were set for each of those profiles.

                                                trshaner wrote:


                                                TFT Central suggest using the 'Custom Color Mode Setting.' You can see the settings they used and results obtained from monitor calibration here under 'Calibration Results:' Dell U2711 Review

                                                I tried them, and it was't great.  I used the windows calibration and got a better result.  Obviously the calibration device, which should arrive next week, will sort it out.

                                                 

                                                So given that with the monitor set to custom, or adobe rgb, or standard OSD, and then calibrated, and never changed, Photoshop will be ok, however other apps not.

                                                 

                                                so I can do the switching between OSD profiles, and ICC profiles as I switch apps. (bit of a pain)
                                                use sRGB across the board, let's face it, no one will see my images in A-RGB anyway, they are seen on web, email and Tv monitors.

                                                or finally live with oversaturated images in other applications...

                                                 

                                                Kind of a Hobson's choice really.

                                                • 22. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                  wcn_dave wrote:

                                                   

                                                  However, if i stop using photoshop and start using IE and Powerpoint, I will be getting over-saturation, so my thought was to switch between monitor profiles, and at the same time switch between the ICC profiles that were set for each of those profiles.

                                                  Yes, that's the way you have to do it. Whenever you switch a setting in the monitor, you also need to switch to the corresponding monitor profile - the one that describes that behavior. Whenever you do that, you also have to relaunch Photoshop (or any other color managed app). The monitor profile is loaded at application startup, and that's the profile that will be used for the conversion until next launch.

                                                   

                                                  Or just make it a point to use color managed applications, like Firefox for web. If you have to use non-color managed apps, like MS Office, ignore the oversaturation.

                                                   

                                                  So Photoshop knows from monitor profile to make adjustments when sending out data.

                                                  it also knows from the current working colour space how to make those adjustments, so it can take an sRGB image, and send it correctly to screen, as well as taking an Adobe RGB image and sending correctly to screen because it will sort of do an internal conversion first.

                                                  Just think source profile > destination profile. Same mechanism as in all color management operations. For display, it's document profile > monitor profile. Whatever the document profile happens to be.

                                                   

                                                  I've used wide gamut monitors for years and it's no problem as long as you understand what's going on.

                                                  • 23. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                    trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                    D Fosse wrote:

                                                    I've used wide gamut monitors for years and it's no problem as long as you understand what's going on.

                                                    Same here. I did extensive research before making the decision to buy a wide gamut monitor. I also use MS Office apps and other apps that aren't color managed. The option of using the monitor's sRGB preset mode helped me to make the decision. Once I started using the monitor it became clear I could live with the over-saturated colors in non-color managed applications. These applications will never display accurate colors since they don't use the monitor profile. You can set the monitor to sRGB and they will look closer to reality, but never 100% accurate.

                                                     

                                                    If you do "color-critical" work in non-color managed apps the best solution is to use a 2nd monitor that is standard gamut. You can calibrate and profile it separate from the wide gamut display. This will make colors fairly accurate in non-color managed apps. You may already have an old standard gamut monitor you can put back in service.

                                                    • 24. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                      wcn_dave Level 1

                                                      Hi trshaner, I am currently using 4 monitors, and only one is wide gamut.

                                                       

                                                      I guess my thoughts at the moment are that I do two types of work, website work, and photography work.

                                                       

                                                      For website work, it seems clear that just sticking with sRGB across the board is easier, as that's my target audience.  However I don't really want to use PS on a smaller (physically and pixels) screen.

                                                       

                                                      When doing photography work, the photos end up 70% on internet/email, 29% viewed by TV / tablet across local network and maybe 1% printed, or 0.1%

                                                      So again, with all those sRGB viewers out there, I am not sure of the benefit.  I end up taking images / scans / photos, which are normally in sRGB, converting to Adobe RGB so I can see all the pretty colours on my screen.  Then when done, export them back out as sRGB, which means I was not really looking at what I was producing.

                                                       

                                                      I got into this because something in lightroom looked different when exported, on the same monitor.  So LR was working Adobe-RGB (there doesn't seem to be a setting for that like there is in Photoshop), and I was looking at it in a non-colour managed program.

                                                       

                                                      Maybe my most sensible solution is just to switch the monitor to sRGB, and calibrate all my monitors.  Unless anyone can think of a really compelling reason to use Adobe RGB.

                                                       

                                                      Also, when I bought the monitor, I got it because it is 2560x1440, not because it had a wide gamut, didn't even know what that was at the time ;-)

                                                       

                                                      I think I'll try to simplify my life and stick with sRGB - I really do appreciate all the comments that helped me come to a greater understanding of what's going on here, many thanks again to you all!

                                                      • 25. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                        trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                        Also, when I bought the monitor, I got it because it is 2560x1440, not because it had a wide gamut, didn't even know what that was at the time ;-)

                                                        A wide gamut monitor is only beneficial when soft proofing images with a printer profile. The wider gamut helps to insure you are seeing accurate color since most printers have some gamut that falls outside the sRGB color space. This especially true when using wide gamut inkjet printers. It would also be beneficial when images are to be viewed by others on a wide gamut display.

                                                         

                                                        wcn_dave wrote:

                                                         

                                                        When doing photography work, the photos end up 70% on internet/email, 29% viewed by TV / tablet across local network and maybe 1% printed, or 0.1%

                                                        It looks like 99% of your work will be viewed on devices with no better than sRGB gamut displays. You are better off using your u2711 monitor's sRGB preset mode AND calibrating it in that mode. This should make rendering on the wide gamut monitor look more accurate in non-color managed applications.

                                                         

                                                        wcn_dave wrote:

                                                         

                                                        So again, with all those sRGB viewers out there, I am not sure of the benefit.  I end up taking images / scans / photos, which are normally in sRGB, converting to Adobe RGB so I can see all the pretty colours on my screen.  Then when done, export them back out as sRGB, which means I was not really looking at what I was producing.

                                                        Converting original image files that have the smaller sRGB color space to the larger Adobe RGB will NOT increase the gamut. The image files should look identical. It sounds like you are using PS with 'Assign Profile'> Adobe RGB. You should be using 'Convert to Profile'> Adobe RGB, which will do an actual color space conversion. When you use 'Assign Profile' and select a wider color space it stretches the smaller sRGB color space to fit, which will make the image will look more "vibrant." This is an inaccurate rendering that merely distorts the color.

                                                        http://mosaicdesignservices.com/webgraphics/presentations/2007-02/images/adobergbvssrgb.jpg

                                                        • 26. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                          wcn_dave Level 1

                                                          Excellent, exactly what I was thinking.  I had set my camera to Adobe RGB for a moment, however it's more that my point and clicks, and other sources are sRGB and all my outputs will be.  My printer does really nice photos, however it's not special in any way, and rare that I need something amazing.

                                                           

                                                          I have now calibrated all my screens with the i1 display pro, and an image looks the same across all screens, although I do have some issues.  A topic for another thread I feel ;-)

                                                          • 27. Re: Exported photo different from lightroom
                                                            F. McLion Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                            wcn_dave schrieb:

                                                             

                                                            ...  I had set my camera to Adobe RGB for a moment, ...

                                                            Remember that the this setting has no relevance if you're shooting RAW. The color space in camera is only applied to non-RAW formats like jpg.