1 Reply Latest reply on Apr 21, 2016 8:54 AM by Steve Grisetti

    best quality dvd

    eduardor59287135

      Hello, I have the following question.

      I have a video of 3GB for recording on a DVD.
      Despite changing the parameters of quality video recording with a size of only a few megabytes (360MB).

      As I can do to make the video occupies the entire DVD to be viewed in the highest quality ??

      I tried creating the project as bluray and then burn them as DVD, but it is the same.

      Try to increase the bit rate of the video from premiere and if demaciado, the video is not visible in the timeline of encore.

      or please if anyone has any trick or solution, they are greatly appreciate it.

      Thank you.

        • 1. Re: best quality dvd
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          You won't be putting your original video files on your DVD, so it doesn't matter how big the project files are. Once the files are transcoded to DVD files by the program, you will be able to fit about 70-80 minutes of video on a DVD disc.

           

          Assuming you're working with camcorder video and that you've matched your project settings to your video specs, your DVD should look virtually identical to your original footage with one exception -- it will be DVD resolution.

           

          DVD resolution is 720x480 pixels. So, if your original footage is high-def or higher resolution, your DVD isn't going to look nearly as clear and detailed. But otherwise, quality should be excellent.

           

          Aside from resolution, what do you want to improve in your DVD? How are you comparing your DVD to your original footage? On a TV?

           

          If you're judging video quality while watching your DVD on your computer, make sure you're using a good media player like the VLC Media Player, rather than something like Windows Media Player. DVD video is interlaced, which doesn't look as good on a computer as it does on your TV. But VLC Media Player does a great job of blending the interlaced frames so that they look very good on a computer.