5 Replies Latest reply on May 21, 2016 9:31 AM by katem83754080

    Standard or extended license?

    katem83754080

      I am making websites for a portfolio as I get started in web design.  I'm inventing fictional businesses/people and making websites as though for those businesses.  (Examples would be things like a cupcake bakery, a veterinarian, a violinist advertising for lessons, a wedding website for a fake couple.  They're all inoffensive, and all made up out of my head.)  I hope to have created ten or more of these before I'm done, and have most or all of them displayed on my personal portfolio site.  Their purpose is to show my web skills so that I can get a job, or freelance work. 

       

      Am I ok using Adobe Stock images I licensed?  Do I need an extended license or is a standard license enough?  Are there more terms I should be aware of than this?: http://wwwimages.adobe.com/content/dam/acom/en/legal/servicetou/Adobe-Stock-Additional-Ter ms_20160119.pdf

       

      Thank you!

        • 1. Re: Standard or extended license?
          Brad Lawryk Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Your standard license should be fine as long as you are not selling the remade sites as templates. If they are being sold as templates then you would need the Extended License. If they are used solely for your own personal portfolio you should be fine with the Standard License.

          • 2. Re: Standard or extended license?
            katem83754080 Level 1

            Thank you, that is very helpful!  I have some follow-up questions about attribution.  I see that Adobe Stock wants us to provide attribution of the images when they are used on social media or in "an editorial article."

             

            1) What is an editorial article?

             

            2) If I create page mockups of a website for my portfolio, complete with images from Adobe Stock, and then post the mockups on my blog in an entry, does that count as an editorial article requiring attribution? 

             

            3) If the answer to #2 is yes, do I need to put attribution on each of the images in the mockups, all together in one place on one of the mockups (like on one page of the mocked-up website), or listed in the text of the blog post?

             

            THANK YOU!

            • 3. Re: Standard or extended license?
              katem83754080 Level 1

              Hello again, I realized I have another question also.  If I include these images in a website that I put on the internet as part of my portfolio, I'm sure I should follow the guidelines for use of Adobe Stock images on websites, which include the directive to "take all reasonable actions to prevent website visitors from downloading or reusing the Work" (http://wwwimages.adobe.com/content/dam/acom/en/legal/servicetou/Adobe-Stock-Additional-Ter ms_20160119.pdf)

               

              Is there any precaution I should take besides disabling right clicks?  (I am new to the web so I feel I may be ignorant.)

              • 4. Re: Standard or extended license?
                Brad Lawryk Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                I would never recommend disabling the right click. It doesn't help anyway as there is a lot of other ways for anyone to get the image if they want it. Really all you need to do for web is to reduce the image to 72dpi from 300dpi so they are not getting the full Hi res image. This is something you should do with all web images anyway as leaving them at 300 only increases the size on a monitor not the image quality.

                 

                300 dpi = Print

                72 dpi = Web

                 

                So just change the images to 72 dpi and you will be fine.

                • 5. Re: Standard or extended license?
                  katem83754080 Level 1

                  Thank you, that is very helpful!  I have some follow-up questions about

                  attribution.  I see that Adobe Stock wants us to provide attribution of the

                  images when they are used on social media or in "an editorial article."

                   

                   

                   

                  1) What is an editorial article?

                   

                   

                   

                  2) If I create page mockups of a website for my portfolio, complete with

                  images from Adobe Stock, and then post the mockups on my blog in an entry,

                  does that count as an editorial article requiring attribution?

                   

                   

                   

                  3) If the answer to #2 is yes, do I need to put attribution on each of the

                  images in the mockups, all together in one place on one of the mockups

                  (like on one page of the mocked-up website), or listed in the text of the

                  blog post?

                   

                   

                   

                  THANK YOU!

                   

                  On Sat, May 21, 2016 at 11:48 AM, Brad Lawryk <forums_noreply@adobe.com>