10 Replies Latest reply on May 13, 2016 8:54 AM by AnnieVE

    Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?

    AnnieVE Level 1

      Hello!  Do I need to calibrate my brand new monitor before i do all my editing and eventual printing?  I just got this computer in, so I don't know if it is already calibrated, at least for the first month.  Of  course, I don't know how long it has been sitting at the warehouse, but at least I know it is brand new and has never been used. 

       

      Thank you!

       

      Anne

        • 1. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          Most monitors do not come calibrated, so it's good idea to calibrate before you start editing images.

          Also, profiles supplied by monitor manufacturers are notoriously bad, so a profile produced by a hardware calibrator is guaranteed to be better than any "canned" profile.

          • 2. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
            AnnieVE Level 1

            Ah, ok, thank you!  I wasn't sure what to do this first time that I start to use it with LR. 

             

            Thank you very much!

            Anne

            • 4. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
              AnnieVE Level 1

              Thank you, Digital Dog.  That was a great article. 

              • 5. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                Now you can move onto this!

                 

                Why are my prints too dark?

                A video update to a written piece on subject from 2013

                 

                In this 24 minute video, I'll cover:

                 

                Are your prints really too dark?

                Display calibration and WYSIWYG

                Proper print viewing conditions

                Trouble shooting to get a match

                Avoiding kludges that don't solve the problem

                 

                High resolution: http://digitaldog.net/files/Why_are_my_prints_too_dark.mp4

                Low resolution: https://youtu.be/iS6sjZmxjY4

                • 6. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                  AnnieVE Level 1

                  Hi Digital Dog,

                   

                  The video was great... nicely paced and followed logically well, and well spoken too.

                   

                  I wish I had a printer that was good enough to print and compare with my display calibration.  Right now I print at the photo lab, and a day or two later they have it ready for me to look at.  As you can imagine, it is a terrifically slow process, but certainly not one that can be avoided.  I spoke with the lab's graphic artist and she said their printer was using Adobe RGB 1998, which is what I had my PS color space set to and my monitor as well. 

                   

                  Points well taken on not having consistent illumination between monitor and print viewing.

                   

                  In addition to images appearing "dark", the other problem I am having is the printer banding gradient areas in the image.  This is what I was hoping to address with the LR soft proof software. Of course now I can't seem to find any icc profile for my low-end printer (it was only $200) HP Photosmart 7525, or for my paper, IP Hammermill high end  paper. 

                   

                  When I go to soft proof right now, I select Adobe RGB 1998, but it won't let me check off Simulate Paper & Ink because it can't find the icc profile (for either the printer or the paper).  I guess the Adobe RGB 1998 is too general??  There doesn't appear to be any default profiles for paper either.  I thought that Adobe was going to provide some of the more common ones...  My printer driver is indeed installed because I print on it all the time.

                   

                  Well, my trials go on, but I am further along thanks to your expertise.   Really great video.  Thank you!

                   

                  Anne

                  • 7. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                    thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                    It is pointless to soft proof to Adobe RGB (1998), you need the printer profile. You don't see a simulation of ink and paper because no such table, data exists in Adobe RGB (1998) but would in the printer's output profile.

                    • 8. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                      AnnieVE Level 1

                      Thanks, DigitalDog. 

                       

                      I found this from the Adobe site:

                       

                      Adobe RGB (1998) color image encoding

                      ICC-based color management workflows are becoming the standard for ensuring reliable color reproduction from screen to print. Many professional workflows are built around the Adobe RGB (1998) ICC color profile first introduced in Adobe® Photoshop® 5.0 software and now available across the Adobe product line.

                      Every device for capturing and reproducing graphics and images — be it a scanner, a digital camera, a monitor, or a printer — has different capabilities for reproducing color, resulting in color inconsistencies. In an ICC-based color-management system, color profiles are created for each device, so that the colors in an image can be modified throughout the workflow to compensate for the differences in each supported device. The goal is to maintain the visual appearance of the image to the greatest degree possible.

                      Effective color management requires that a color profile be attached to every image or graphic to indicate the "native" color conditions — also known as the color space — under which the file was created. Adobe applications introduced the idea of a "working" color space, one that is not necessarily tied to a specific device but that represents the ideal conditions for image reproduction. The Adobe RGB (1998) profile has been widely adopted as a working space because it provides a relatively large and balanced color gamut that can be easily repurposed for reproduction on a variety of devices.

                      Adobe's own ICC profile for the Adobe RGB (1998) color space is included with all Adobe color-managed software applications, including Adobe Acrobat 5.0 and later, Illustrator 9.0 and later, InDesign, GoLive 6.0 and later, Photoshop 5.0.2 and later, and Photoshop Elements software. With the appropriate legal agreements, it is also available for distribution by third-party hardware and software vendors. Find out more about the Adobe RGB (1998) color image encoding (PDF: 551k) used for the Adobe RGB (1998) color space.

                      • 9. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                        thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                        Read this:

                        http://www.adobe.com/digitalimag/pdfs/phscs2ip_colspace.pdf

                         

                        Adobe RGB (1998), sRGB, ProPhoto RGB and so forth are class of profiles Adobe calls working spaces. They are not based on any output device (there is no such thing as an sRGB printer). They are based on theoretical emissive displays. They have nothing to do, per se with an output device. 

                        • 10. Re: Need to calibrate brand new monitors before editing/printing in LR?
                          AnnieVE Level 1

                          Gotchya...  ya, kind of what I gathered from the article...  it's like a generic space for lack of any other profile, tho the article does say that it is recommended for printers since it's gamut applies to the vast majority of printers' color spaces.  I was hoping Adobe would have taken it one step further and created corresponding paper profiles to go with it.  I know it's not exact, but for folks like me, it's better than nothing.

                           

                          I did contact HP, and they are going to contact Adobe about it!  I was going to contact Adobe, but the HP guy said he wanted to. 

                           

                          I looked at the profiles that were on the red river website, but my paper doesn't match the weights of theirs.  Mine is just 20lb.  68 lb seems heavy.  I paint on 140 to 300 pound, but 68 lb seems heavy for print purposes.

                           

                          In the end, I may download just anything...  maybe an epson icc...  all I really need is something to let me practice soft-proofing to a real printer/paper profile so that I have at least a little experience before I call my local photo lab.  It just would be nice to have something I could actually print and see how well it worked.

                           

                          Thank you so much again for taking the time to share your incredible expertise.  I wish I had your skill already! 

                           

                          Anne