3 Replies Latest reply on May 5, 2006 6:01 PM by Newsgroup_User

    Importing file types?

    Adamleeds
      I am building a CDROM and would like to have varying file types opening within it. Pdf's, powerpoints, word files etc. What is the best way to do this. I know about linking to files that are on the web, but I would like to directly open a file from the CD and launch it in application e.g. adobe reader.

      Any help greatly appreicated
        • 1. Re: Importing file types?
          Level 7
          To open a file, you need to know the path to the application that will
          open that file. Unfortunately, its not as simple as clicking on the file
          and having the user's computer resolve the path to the app.

          To find this path you'll need to use an Xtra. There are two that do this
          well: Buddy API and fileXtra4.

          You should also consider a strategy to use when the user doesn't have
          the application that you need to use.

          --
          Rob
          _______
          Rob Dillon
          Adobe Community Expert
          http://www.ddg-designs.com
          412-243-9119

          http://www.macromedia.com/software/trial/
          • 2. Re: Importing file types?
            Level 7
            Things go smoothly if user's have acrobat reader and powerpoint player
            as the registered apps, but if they have the authoring environments then
            buddyAPI will cause (I think) the file to be opened for editing, the
            user may have to manualy start the powerpoint playing.

            There is a free powerpoint player you can distrubute on the CD.
            • 3. Re: Importing file types?
              Level 7
              On Fri, 05 May 2006 21:20:45 GMT, JB posted in macromedia.director.basics:

              > Things go smoothly if user's have acrobat reader and powerpoint player
              > as the registered apps, but if they have the authoring environments then
              > buddyAPI will cause (I think) the file to be opened for editing, the
              > user may have to manualy start the powerpoint playing.
              >
              > There is a free powerpoint player you can distrubute on the CD.

              You can also open the file in presentation mode using baRunProgram and
              command line switches.

              Or save it from PowerPoint as a .pps file.


              --
              Mark A. Boyd
              Keep-On-Learnin'